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Old 08-30-2014, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,393 posts, read 4,170,610 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
the most popular retirement plan is work until you can't.
Yes, and these are the people who are identified by the people who claim that retiring can cause you to die early. An example might be Andy Rooney as mentioned earlier. He probably retired when he realized he wasn't going to be around much longer. Give me data on people who retire early(55-65) so that they can do something else, even if it is just to sit around or travel, and track how long they live on.
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Old 08-30-2014, 03:51 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,463,318 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
Yes, and these are the people who are identified by the people who claim that retiring can cause you to die early. An example might be Andy Rooney as mentioned earlier. He probably retired when he realized he wasn't going to be around much longer. Give me data on people who retire early(55-65) so that they can do something else, even if it is just to sit around or travel, and track how long they live on.
I think the most popular is to work until you no longer have to and no longer want to. At least that was my plan and so far it's working. Working until you no longer can bespeaks of obsession and no life outside of work. Pitiable in my opinion!
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Old 08-30-2014, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,128 posts, read 12,373,396 times
Reputation: 13936
Quote:
Originally Posted by things to say View Post
Lots of my baby boomer relatives in their 50s tell me they have not saved up enough money to retire so they plan on working FULL TIME until the day they die.

Interesting statement but is this even possible? I wonder how many people who die after 70 years old actually had been working full time until a few weeks before they died. If they live to their 80s or 90s and lose their job is an employer going to hire them in a full time professional job if they are older than 70?

Do you know many older people who continue to work full time until they die?
I'm 66 now and still working but just five years ago I was thinking I would never quit. It wasn't long ago that I pictured myself working to age 70 or 75 but just in the past year my tune has changed.

Thankfully I positioned myself to retire by relocating and cutting expenses by downsizing so I could retire if I "had to" but I couldn't picture myself has wanting to.

I love my job, have always liked what I do but I have about had it. Physically it isn't hard but I just don't want to deal with the stress anymore. I handle stress less well with every passing day and the heck with it, I just don't want to deal with it anymore.

Maybe part time a few hours a week but that would be about it... basically a place where I could "go to work", have coffee and leave for the week. Get out of the house once in a while.

But it feels good, I was telling my wife just last week I feel where we have finally arrived at the place where I could retire and not suffer financially and that alone is a great feeling to have. If I lost my job on Monday I would almost look at it as if they were doing me a favor. That's a good place to be.

Working to 80? No way, it would kill me.

Being 66 I tire more easily and in my heyday I routinely functioned on four to six hours sleep a night but now I honestly need 8 hours and another thing I noticed for the first time in my married life I am actually going to bed before midnight. In 1990 I NEVER went to bed before 1:00 AM and was ALWAYS at work at 6:3o or 7:00 the next morning six days a week. Age, I simply can not do that anymore.

For the snotty youth that sometimes lurk in this forum I have a message for you. Your youth and exuberance is no match for my experience in the ways of treachery and I don't care what school you went to. Got it?

I am simply waiting for my wife to hit 66 (less than one year now) and I will be joining you all.
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Old 08-30-2014, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,723,738 times
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^^^^^ Well said, Nicet4. Your story is a good illustration of the fact that one can like one's job but still be glad to retire. The two are not always mutually exclusive. (Some other poster made that observation but I can't remember who it was in order to give proper credit.)

People like you have the best of both worlds. It always makes me sad to read the posts by people who hate their jobs with such passion and just can't wait to get out, saying that they can finally start living life. I always thought I was living life while I was working full time; there were many enjoyments, both at work and outside of work.
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Old 08-30-2014, 08:02 PM
 
4,477 posts, read 4,737,152 times
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We have a secretary at work, she is 74. Her responsibilities have decreased greatly with more direct computer access for the doctors and nurses. The secretary does actually very little of what she used to do. On top of that she is partially deaf and we all have to raise our voices, her memory is not good anymore, she has more and more ailments and she has sat at her desk many times appearing to be asleep. Her desk is at the front of the nursing station. Patients have said they just wait for other staff as they don't feel like they can bother her. So much has to be repeated to her. I have directly asked her, I've known her for 35yrs, if she has thought about retiring. Never got a straight answer but I guess that is an answer. It is very touchy for our boss as the secretaries are unionized. So, we have to wait until it occurs to her that she needs to go. Unless, our boss can build enough of a case that she is not able to do the job.

As I wrote at the beginning of this thread about the nurse, she was 78, had to leave after a fall on the unit but she would have come back. I really wish people like this could see the reality of their continuing to work and make the decision for themselves instead of others having to point it out to them.
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Old 08-30-2014, 09:57 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,179 posts, read 2,851,972 times
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If you're self-employed I would imagine it would be easier to say no to retirement if you wanted - you're the boss.... but I can see a lot of employers making it clear that if you are not up to the job - you need to go.

I cannot imagine being allowed to work for an employer well into your 80's. At least in my line of work.
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Old 08-30-2014, 11:55 PM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,221,383 times
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We had a guy who eventually just had to be forced out.
They'd already lightened his work load and stopped giving him assignments to do...and he still kept coming to work. Either didn't get the hint, or didn't want to.

But he fell/fainted a couple of times at work, and almost fell a couple of others, sometimes he'd forget why he walked over to someone's desk. I think he just became too much of a physical injury liability.

I don't know what they eventually said to him, or how they did it.
And I think he has plenty of money. And now he has neither his job, nor his health to enjoy retirement.

Some people may indeed want to work until they drop....I'm not one of them.
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Old 08-31-2014, 12:40 AM
 
10,812 posts, read 8,054,817 times
Reputation: 17010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Interesting. There is nothing like the bitterness of a woman with a grievance, whether perceived or real. It's amazing how some manage to hold on to the resentment for years and years, indeed for a lifetime. It's best never to criticize a woman, has been my experience in 70 years of living.
Bitterness, resentment, and grievance are gender-neutral, sorry your experience has been otherwise.
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Old 08-31-2014, 01:11 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,213,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
I worked with a nurse, she was 78 when she left work. She ONLY left because she tripped and did damage to her hip and lower back. But unless the manager of the unit didn't drive it home with HR that she was not fit for duty, on an inpatient psych unit, she intended to come back and continue working. Personally, I am glad she is gone, she was an incredibly miserable woman. And this woman had plenty of money she didn't need to work.

I think she would not have retired unless something physical happened to her. Some people don't retire until something happens and they just have to face it. Or they die before.
This has become a major issue for physicians and some hospitals have initiated mandatory competency evaluations at a specified age. Aging Doctors Face Greater Scrutiny - Kaiser Health News

Perhaps it is time for those who license nurses to adopt a similar strategy.
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Old 08-31-2014, 02:14 AM
 
71,463 posts, read 71,629,249 times
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i gave notice friday that aug 1st will be my last day officially at work. i am only working part time now but will pull the plug in august when marilyn goes on medicare.

but when not traveling i intend to still give one or two days a week to doing technical training for the firm.

i like what i do and the fact i can come and go as i please is nice. i just will not be tied down to the job anymore.

i was going to get licensed and do some work in the financial industry but that is to much like work and will require more time spent on the job then i care to do.

i much rather reap the rewards of making it this far and do all the things we want before it's to late.
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