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Old 08-19-2014, 03:50 PM
 
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Work till your legs give out and the muscles stop and the boss says it time to go as you are a safety hazard to yourself and other if you continue to work here , But must never say your are to old as that is discrimination
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Old 08-19-2014, 06:51 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,188 posts, read 2,858,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kharing View Post
Many in healthcare....I can attest to that. I know of a few clinicians in their 70's that need to retire but can't afford to due to poor planning and ridiculous mortgages. My mother is 67, still working as a nurse and doesn't plan on retiring. She doesn't "look" her age and sees retiring as putting one foot in the grave.

The ones that I work with need the rest of the staff to carry them....they have trouble keeping up and make frequent medical errors.
My mother's physician was her same age - in his 80's - when my mother had knee surgery. We all thought he was a quack - but she loved him. He forgot to re-adjust her coumadin post surgery - and she had a stroke.

Sadly, we were right.

The oldest person I know working was a gentleman in his mid-70's who became a clerk/typist/receptionist in our legal department. Poor planning and a child - or adult child, I should say - who cost him money as the child was always in trouble. The "child" was probably in his 40's.

The gentleman was not in good health - and had a cardiac episode at work. Paramedics were called and he was taken to the hospital where he died shortly thereafter.

Incredibly sad.
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:02 PM
 
Location: West Virginia
515 posts, read 653,356 times
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Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
The goalposts can be moved.
Yep, When I was in my 30's, I made a plan to retire at 55. Well, at 55 I probably could have but I moved it to 58. When I reached 58, I moved it to 60 but actually retired 3 months before I reached 60. It was the best decision I ever made and I'll probably live longer because I'm more active and stress free. Being retired doesn't mean I don't work though. I work every day at things I want to do. The pay sucks but the benefits are awesome....
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Old 08-19-2014, 11:34 PM
 
2,556 posts, read 2,305,031 times
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I also think about 50% of people aged 65 have a serious disability that will prevent them from being able to work as usual. At least if I remember the numbers correctly. So one in two people claiming they will not retire delude themselves as they lack the ability to work (at least not in their current job).
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Old 08-20-2014, 03:36 AM
 
71,683 posts, read 71,801,099 times
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the most popular retirement plan is work until you can't.
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Old 08-20-2014, 03:40 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,515,215 times
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I don't think too many of us want to transition directly from full-time employment to complete retirement; it can take a toll on both physical and emotional health.

I've run a small business sideline -- bookkeeping and taxes -- since my early thirties; eventually, I got tired of the winter seasonal rush, but turned it over to a friend who also got her mother involved. I'm slowing down enough physically that I know I won't be able to hold my warehouse job much longer (I turn 65 next month) but the partners and I are looking forward to see if we can kick the bookkeeping business into a higher gear.

My Dad was a dairy farmer -- could not stand idle -- kept the herd until he turned 65, but grew a cash crop for the remaining eight years he was around, including the two in which he was diagnosed as terminally ill.
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Old 08-20-2014, 03:50 AM
 
71,683 posts, read 71,801,099 times
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i went part time and am phasing myself out over the next year.
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Old 08-20-2014, 03:50 AM
 
16,437 posts, read 19,145,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
the most popular retirement plan is work until you can't.
I'm not sure how popular it is, but it certainly is a widespread plan.
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Old 08-20-2014, 03:52 AM
 
71,683 posts, read 71,801,099 times
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well if these articles are to be believed it certainly seems to be the trend.

of course with 1/2 the country earning very little those folks have no money at every stage of their life so it isn't just about retirement when it comes to the stats.
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Old 08-20-2014, 04:28 AM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,560,066 times
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My father disliked his job and was thrilled when the opportunity arose for him to take early retirement at age 58. My mother, on the other hand, loved her job. As small-town county employment goes, her job in the court house was prestigious and she was well-respected. She worked until she was 68 and regretted retiring. After my father died, she was bereft and emotionally not handling living alone for literally the first time in her life.

It was a happy day when one of her friends from the court house called and said there was a temp assignment coming open there that she would be perfect for and did I think it would be OK if they offered it to her. OK???, I said. Puh-leez, get her out of the house! She took the job and stretched it out for several years to its completion. When it was finished, she moved straight into another part-time job as secretary to the director of a small museum. She only quit that one when her health at close to 80 made it impossible for her to continue.

Some people just like to work. Now, mind you, my mother isn't the kind of person just to "make work" doing just anything. She's not the least bit interested in household chores, cooking, or anything the least bit domestic. Her house could be a wreck but she would sit around saying she had "nothing to do." But she responded positively to the structure and companionship of an office job and was a valued employee, well worth every penny she ever earned. She doesn't seem to be able to create that in her life without an employer. Go figure.
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