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Old 08-20-2014, 10:45 PM
 
1,437 posts, read 725,248 times
Reputation: 3729

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Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
Working late in life is in my DNA. My Grandfather died working in his garden at the age of about 86, he could not sit still. I have retired twice and gone back to work both times and now work full time at 69. I see no reason to stop, I love what I do.

I have seen so many people wait all their lives to retire and when they do 6 months later they drop dead. Nope, activity keeps me mentally and physically healthy. I may work for a couple more years then take a year off to do my bucket list thing of touring the 48 States. But, God willing, I will go back to work after that.

Besides, I like having the extra money to waste.

Don
No offense, but just as many people or more may have died while they were working....there is no way you or I can come up with verifiable stats on that nor those who have suffered heart attacks, anxiety, stress, etc. caused by the demands of their jobs - who knows how much longer those people might have lived had they retired and avoided the stressors incurred in their jobs.

Also the notion you put forward that 'If you retire you'll die" seems like one of those empty superstitions/sayings created by "the man" to keep people working and under control. It reminds me of someone saying if you masturbate you'll go blind (hey......I can still see the screen!!http://pics3.city-data.com/forum/ima...ons/icon10.gif)

Another thing.....people can be MORE active in retirement than at work. With the exception of those that have a physically active job (such as landscapers, construction, etc.) many in the workforce spend their days in an office or cubicle.....how physically active is that?? I also don't think (after say 20, 30 + years or so) most people find their jobs mentally challenging, just more of the same old, by rote tasks that need to be done (unless one is in a job with ever changing dynamics but that is not most people).

The one part that might affect people is the social aspect and/or lack of contact & camaraderie that they have at work.....but that is individual to the person, i.e.; whether they liked the people they worked with, whether they are introverts/extroverts, if they have a social structure outside of work, etc.

So...in a nutshell, the "stay working or die" mantra is nothing more than a convenient soundbite....there are way to many other variables (health, family medical/avg. age of death history, how an individual person adjusts to retirement, etc.) that will dictate someone's physical/mental capacity in retirement.
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Old 08-20-2014, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Exeter, NH
5,303 posts, read 4,405,592 times
Reputation: 5698
Lots of them say that, but they don't understand that health problems will FORCE THEM to retire. Lack of money doesn't matter when you physically can't work.
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Old 08-20-2014, 11:01 PM
 
Location: In The Pacific
986 posts, read 1,179,524 times
Reputation: 1233
There's nothing wrong or unusual with people who love what they do to earn a living and isn't considered work to them! It's their happy long life daily routine til they die at work or at home in their sleep! Vacations from their work is just a bonus, so why retire when life is good?
Me personally, I retired 6 yrs early and have been enjoying our retirement lifestyle overseas ever since!
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Old 08-20-2014, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,522 posts, read 8,773,196 times
Reputation: 12218
I'm 71 and still working. I plan to retire at the end of 2015. After that, who knows. I like hard physical labor, even though i am a professional, so I guess i will use part of my retirement time to fix my old summer cottage. It should be fun.
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Old 08-21-2014, 12:01 AM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,334,622 times
Reputation: 20438
No one in my family has ever "Retired"... we just keep working until we die.

Also, no one has ever had a pension so this could be part of the reason.

One side of the family farms and there is always something to do on small family farms even it takes you longer to do it...

The Farmers tend to live into late 80's or early 90's and never retire.

The other side is self employed or small business owners... my Step Grandfather founded a Tool and Die business and was the first one to open the shop each day and the last to lock up at night... even when he could no longer drive in his late 80's he would still do this...

I would say yes... there are those that don't plan to retire and don't...


On the flip side a friend just retired at 53 and had no plans on retiring... the city was changing the pension system and by retiring now she was under the old system which was very generous with lifetime medical and 3% per year...
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Old 08-21-2014, 12:51 AM
 
Location: USA
6,226 posts, read 5,366,624 times
Reputation: 10643
I make 16,000 a year doing manual labor so "retirement" will be when I can't perform anymore, get fired, or die. I live in a small town with a large homeless population. Due to having poor social skills and a learning disability I never managed to gain any real skills or qualifications. There would have been no way I could of survived in a high COL major city.
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Old 08-21-2014, 01:16 AM
 
1,734 posts, read 1,950,957 times
Reputation: 3901
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
No one knows the future, but I think there is a good argument to be made that life is far more transient and temporary than it used to be.

My grandfather was only HS educated and my grandmother didn't finish HS. He worked as a butcher for fifteen years or so then got on at the chemical factory, worked there twenty years or so, with a full pension. Grandmother worked as a cook at the school system, also retiring with a government pension. They never had to contend with traipsing about the country to find work. Hell, they never even dealt with a job change. He was retired well over fifteen years at the time of his death and she's been retired for almost twenty.

The other grandfather is a multiple felon and alcoholic, but he was always handy with fixing things and kept himself afloat by repairing appliances. Grandmother did all sorts of odd jobs. He'd never get a job today with his criminal record, but years ago, it wasn't such an issue. The house has been paid off for years and they have around a quarter million banked. It doesn't seem like a lot, but for a guy with a felony theft conviction and a dozen DUIs, it isn't bad.

I went to college, have around 150 credit hours, have lived in five states since 2012, and am just now finally getting onto what I'd consider relatively solid ground with some upward mobility. I'll probably have to move again at some point. It's taken me until 28 to achieve what they did at probably 20, with a lot more education and time out of the labor market, and I still don't have a pension or any confidence that things will remain as stable as they are now for long.
Emigrations, you are enormously brave. My hat is off to you.
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Old 08-21-2014, 02:22 AM
 
Location: Dillon, Montana
586 posts, read 1,719,789 times
Reputation: 592
I'm 54 and still plugging along for that elusive BA. I chose an English degree because if I am ever unable to do physical work, I can always write! As the world becomes more computerized, Copywriting, especially excellent copywriting, will continue to be in strong demand.

Besides, as agism rears it's ugly head and I am passed over for jobs because of my age, I can hide behind my computer and no one has to know that I'm an old coot! LOL

No, there is no retirement for me I'm afraid. I haven't paid enough into SS over the years to even begin to support me. If I retire at 75 I might have a chance, but as cost of living rises, I'm not holding my breath!
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Old 08-21-2014, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,417 posts, read 21,259,305 times
Reputation: 24241
I'm going to retire next year and I'm going to read and re-read and re-read until it all soaks in, my OSHO Tantra Buddhism/Philosophy books. That should be fun! Acquiring states of utter thoughtlessness, mindlessness, emptiness until the word work disappears from my vocabulary!

And if that doesn't work, a medical marijuana card!
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Old 08-21-2014, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,157 posts, read 54,630,432 times
Reputation: 66572
Quote:
Originally Posted by luckyram View Post
No offense, but just as many people or more may have died while they were working....there is no way you or I can come up with verifiable stats on that nor those who have suffered heart attacks, anxiety, stress, etc. caused by the demands of their jobs - who knows how much longer those people might have lived had they retired and avoided the stressors incurred in their jobs.

Also the notion you put forward that 'If you retire you'll die" seems like one of those empty superstitions/sayings created by "the man" to keep people working and under control. It reminds me of someone saying if you masturbate you'll go blind (hey......I can still see the screen!!http://pics3.city-data.com/forum/ima...ons/icon10.gif)

Another thing.....people can be MORE active in retirement than at work. With the exception of those that have a physically active job (such as landscapers, construction, etc.) many in the workforce spend their days in an office or cubicle.....how physically active is that?? I also don't think (after say 20, 30 + years or so) most people find their jobs mentally challenging, just more of the same old, by rote tasks that need to be done (unless one is in a job with ever changing dynamics but that is not most people).

The one part that might affect people is the social aspect and/or lack of contact & camaraderie thmiat they have at work.....but that is individual to the person, i.e.; whether they liked the people they worked with, whether they are introverts/extroverts, if they have a social structure outside of work, etc.

So...in a nutshell, the "stay working or die" mantra is nothing more than a convenient soundbite....there are way to many other variables (health, family medical/avg. age of death history, how an individual person adjusts to retirement, etc.) that will dictate someone's physical/mental capacity in retirement.
Exactly. There are tons of things I'd like to do and not enough time to do them in. But a woman I worked with retired after 40 years and is miserable. She's bored. I guess she doesn't read, or explore places, or have any hobbies. I don't get it.

Meanwhile, another guy we worked with wanted to retire, boss talked him into staying with a promotion, and we came to work one day to learn he'd dropped dead of a heart attack the night before.
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