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Old 08-23-2014, 03:37 AM
 
Location: Purgatory
6,322 posts, read 4,762,782 times
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I'm in my 30 s now. If i was well off/retired, i would go back to school for an MBA in studio art- probably sculpture. This is why I play the lottery (ie, pay the poor tax!)
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Old 08-24-2014, 08:33 AM
 
1,770 posts, read 2,443,971 times
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I have a friend who when we were in college together said he would retire when he was 35. He worked summers for IBM (our home town area Endicott, NY). He graduated, computer/math degree, worked for IBM, bought stock, lived at home and indeed, when he was 35 he quit working. He moved to New Mexico, bought some land, a general store and a house in a remote area of NM. He worked parttime as the postmaster delivering a rural route 3 days a week. Like me, he is a recluse. He is highly educated, very intelligent and has a variety of hobbies. He eventually married and had a son and he and his wife still live in the remote area. People are definitely different and he is content with that isolated life style and his way of life. He doesn't have a great income stream from his IBM stock and investments but they do fine and they are happy.
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Old 08-24-2014, 05:41 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,183 posts, read 2,857,897 times
Reputation: 4878
I don't have a college degree but my work experience has taught me a lot. And provided a roof over my head - and food on the table. And support for my spouse and I when he has been under and un-employed.

I am training my replacement starting next week. I hope I can impart to her knowledge and experience well beyond just the daily tasks. I hope she learns how to think outside the box.

And while I am grateful for the support and all I have learned - retirement will be a joy - to live unencumbered by the daily grind of work.

I think it's pretty hard to find interests that keep you busy - for over 50 years.

I could have had another track had I gotten a degree - but I have no regrets.
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Old 08-24-2014, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Miraflores
786 posts, read 894,992 times
Reputation: 1531
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Call me curious. What do you do with your time? What are you excited about doing when you get up in the morning?
My interests change over time. The only constant is managing my portfolio. I still look forward to my morning cup of coffee, business news and the opening bell on Wall Street.
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Old 08-25-2014, 02:02 AM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,225,700 times
Reputation: 3330
Submariner and Alpineprince,

May I ask what you all did for jobs where you were FORCED to retire at 38, or able to retire at 33? … because whatever those jobs are I’d like to give them a try.

I know there are jobs where a person can retire after 20 years. I’m curious about one where you’re FORCED to retire at 38?

And on a separate note, can we please define what we mean by ‘retired’ – buying a general store and working part-time delivering mail three days a week – is NOT retired. It’s WORKING part time.

For the sake of clarity: retired should mean not working for pay AT ALL

Semi-retired means working part time. It doesn’t matter whether you’re working for travel money, play money, or just to get health insurance covered – you’re STILL WORKING.

Quote:
....when he was 35 he quit working. He moved to New Mexico, bought some land, a general store and a house in a remote area of NM. He worked part-time as the postmaster delivering a rural route 3 days a week. Like me, he is a recluse. He is highly educated, very intelligent and has a variety of hobbies.
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Old 08-25-2014, 02:14 AM
 
2,566 posts, read 2,928,457 times
Reputation: 2785
Retire completely in my 30s? -No, but part-time work would be ideal. I would only work 1 or 2 days a week.
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Old 08-25-2014, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,687 posts, read 49,462,974 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdflk View Post
Submariner and Alpineprince,

May I ask what you all did for jobs where you were FORCED to retire at 38, or able to retire at 33? because whatever those jobs are Id like to give them a try.

I know there are jobs where a person can retire after 20 years. Im curious about one where youre FORCED to retire at 38? ...
I am a submariner. I have served as a crewmember on:
USS George C. Marshall SSBN 654
USS Simon Lake AS-33
USS Casimir Pulaski SSBN 633
USS Alaska SSBN 732

As a crewmember on various submarines. I averaged roughly 7 months of each year living under-water / ice. My tasks were to maintain various systems in support of launching nuclear missiles from mobile hidden launch platforms [Fleet Ballistic Missile submarines].

My employer has a High-Year-Tenure [HYT] policy. As you climb up the ladder of pay-grades, each pay-grades has a limit to how many years you can stay employed. I got to E6, the HYT for E6 is 20 years. Once an E6 reaches 20 years, you are discharged. I began my career on a 6 year contract, then consisted of a series of 4 year contracts. For every 4 year contract I was paid a cash re-enlistment bonus. My last contract it would have taken me to 22 years. But my HYT is set at 20, so I was discharged in mid-contract.

By discharged, I was actually ordered to be transferred to 'Fleet Reserve'. My pension can be looked at as a retainer check. I am obligated to respond, if my employer should ever send me orders to return to service.

ET1 SS - USN Retired

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Old 08-25-2014, 10:06 AM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,225,700 times
Reputation: 3330
Submariner....start at 18, retired at 38...not bad. ( you took the break so I get that for you it was 42.) STILL not a bad way to go.
Being away MONTHS at a time I take it you were able to save LOTS on living expenses.
So if you've got what you need to live on more power to you.

So have worked at all since your "retirement?"...either for money or for 'something to do?
I see you said your a farmer do you sell your crops, or do it 'for fun.'

At 54, I think WHY didn't I get a practical career I could start right after college -- a nice government job, put in my time and retire after 20 or even 30 years. But I didn't know any one who worked for the gov't so it was really an option I thought about. I didn't get a decent paying job (I'm in a creative field) until I was almost 36.

If I'd started with the gov't even right out of grad school at 23 -- I'd be able to retire now.
But that's not the way it happened so I live vicariously through folks like you who can tell me about the joys of retirement -- REAL retirement. A friend just retired at 60 and is having a frigging ball.

(Here in the DC area I can't tell you how many retired military people are TRIPLE dipping! First retirement at 38, second at 58, and work for another department or state agency or company or contractor until 65....geez. I know if you work until 65 that's not EARLY retirement per se. But even if you stop at two 20 year careers, you're still only 58. Not you're 30s or 40s, but that is still considered early retirement.)

Last edited by rdflk; 08-25-2014 at 10:18 AM..
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Old 08-25-2014, 11:31 AM
 
Location: brooklyn, new york, USA
895 posts, read 928,982 times
Reputation: 1300
i personally work only to live and get by putting in as little hours as possible and taking as much money out of it as possible. i know i will be dead one day and i definitely do not want to live my life working it away. i have zero interest in accolades or others telling me how great i am in doing something. i am selfish and want all my time for my own pleasure which includes food sleep sex and free activities. you can die any day. no one is promised tomorrow which is why early retirement is awesome. you get to live life for yourself before it's taken away from you.

that being said, i will never be able to retire at all and i am fine with it. i am now 38 and wish i could have been retired but i did not plan my life around that. i enjoyed each year of my youth as it came with no regrets. lots of (safe) fun. every decade that goes on, my life will get worse mostly because of medical issues. smelling like old people (2-nonenal) and having all sorts of organ or joint problems and popping viagra means that even if i could retire later, it would be meaningless as my best years are behind me.
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Old 08-25-2014, 11:35 AM
 
Location: brooklyn, new york, USA
895 posts, read 928,982 times
Reputation: 1300
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I am a submariner. I have served as a crewmember on:
USS George C. Marshall SSBN 654
USS Simon Lake AS-33
USS Casimir Pulaski SSBN 633
USS Alaska SSBN 732

As a crewmember on various submarines. I averaged roughly 7 months of each year living under-water / ice. My tasks were to maintain various systems in support of launching nuclear missiles from mobile hidden launch platforms [Fleet Ballistic Missile submarines].

My employer has a High-Year-Tenure [HYT] policy. As you climb up the ladder of pay-grades, each pay-grades has a limit to how many years you can stay employed. I got to E6, the HYT for E6 is 20 years. Once an E6 reaches 20 years, you are discharged. I began my career on a 6 year contract, then consisted of a series of 4 year contracts. For every 4 year contract I was paid a cash re-enlistment bonus. My last contract it would have taken me to 22 years. But my HYT is set at 20, so I was discharged in mid-contract.

By discharged, I was actually ordered to be transferred to 'Fleet Reserve'. My pension can be looked at as a retainer check. I am obligated to respond, if my employer should ever send me orders to return to service.

ET1 SS - USN Retired

even if you are injured or no longer capable of performing said tasks? what if you got alzheimers disease like michael j. fox? or something else like bone cancer where you are crippled or so? i think they can only call you back if you are of sound body and mind.
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