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Old 08-19-2014, 12:18 AM
 
49 posts, read 150,309 times
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Thinking exercise.

Often times, younger folks pose the question of wanting to make a career change, but don't because they don't have the money.

Let's change it up a little and let's say you've got enough saved up to not have to work for many years. You're not rich, you just don't *have* to work.

Would you do "nothing"? Would you continue working? Would you start your own business? Would you go back to school?
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Old 08-19-2014, 12:53 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,600 posts, read 39,974,527 times
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I homeschooled my kids for about 10 yrs about that age.

It was time well spent (beats working (career bound)), I took a grunt PT night-shift job to keep food on the table.

age 30 is not too early, age 20 is better yet! (but not as EZ.) If you hitch-up with double income in early 20's aged 30 retirement would be pretty ez as a frugal retiree.

I started working full time at age 15. It was not so bad and I learned some interesting trades.
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Old 08-19-2014, 01:29 AM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,501 posts, read 14,330,903 times
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Do I have enough to travel? That would be first choice, second would be to become a master gardener and learn lots of other things too.
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Old 08-19-2014, 04:44 AM
 
Location: in the miseries
3,302 posts, read 3,580,382 times
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No thanks. I would have gone nuts.
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Old 08-19-2014, 07:45 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,955,483 times
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Well at 30 I had no desire to retire. It seems to me it only came into wanting category in my 50's altho I had planned retired at 52 .I think most go thru life natural changes in a lot of things really.
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:00 AM
 
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Depends on what kind of work you have.

For many highly skilled, highly educated people, a good job is way better than early retirement; on the other hand, early retirement is way better than a bad job.

For example, a good doctor or scientist or mathematician will often want to work as long as he can, whereas a bagboy or call-center mule often wants to retire as early as possible.
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:11 AM
 
Location: delaware
688 posts, read 864,694 times
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working part-time- 2-3 days a week- would have always been my choice, as far back as my twenties. actually, my husband and i both would have liked that schedule, if finances had permitted it. neither of us was super ambitious and work, although we both worked full time for 30+ years, was never the center of our lives.
i would have probably done social work consulting, probably in a medical setting, as i did full-time for several years. he would have probably taught part time perhaps in a private school. he had many interests- gardening, antiques, house remodeling, history- which would have kept him busy enough. for me, having some time to write, read more, and perhaps return to vocal music training would have been enough to fill the time.

catsy girl

Last edited by catsy girl; 08-19-2014 at 08:12 AM.. Reason: spelling error
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Old 08-19-2014, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,587 posts, read 17,574,904 times
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I'll be thirty in two years. I have no desire to completely quit at this point. If it was a "money is no object" scenario, I'd probably travel for a couple of months then go through a PhD program and become a professor. Tenured faculty may not get paid exceptionally well, but can have a lot more meaningful impact than your average corporate mule.
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Old 08-19-2014, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,764 posts, read 10,845,692 times
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My view of 'financially secure' in my 30's, is far different than now... as are the things I enjoy or choose to do, our lifestyle and what we consider important in life. Likewise, I would no longer be interested in my 30-year old life ... even if I could have somehow 'put my life on hold' while I 'went off to join the circus' (?Peter Pan syndrome?),

One can only surf or backpack around the US or Europe for so long, before the emptiness of a life without purpose catches-up. By the same token, I've known many 'street people' who were still 50-year old adolescents ... with little more ambition or interest than their next meal or cot. (So, I guess people are different).

One thing a young drop-out who walks-away from a job, career, family and other traditional trappings of American life,needs to think about --- is that after a few years, they will likely be unable to get back-into the 'system.' I've known many young men whose decisions and lifestyles took them 'out of the mainstream' in their early 20's; ... and who later, found themselves trapped in meaningless lives by their lack of current skills, experience, education and roots.

At 20-30, these things may not seem like a big deal or even desirable, but, at 40-50 and beyond, ... well, one is no longer 20-30!

Last edited by jghorton; 08-19-2014 at 03:43 PM..
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Old 08-19-2014, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish Forbes View Post
Depends on what kind of work you have.

For many highly skilled, highly educated people, a good job is way better than early retirement; on the other hand, early retirement is way better than a bad job.

For example, a good doctor or scientist or mathematician will often want to work as long as he can, whereas a bagboy or call-center mule often wants to retire as early as possible.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
My view of 'financially secure' in my 30's, is far different than now... as are the things I enjoy or choose to do, our lifestyle and what we consider important in life. Likewise, I would no longer be interested in my 30-year old life ... even if I could have somehow 'put my life on hold' while I 'went off to join the circus' (?Peter Pan syndrome?),

One can only surf or backpack around the US or Europe for so long, before the emptiness of a life without purpose catches-up. By the same token, I've known many 'street people' who were still 50-year old adolescents ... with little more ambition or interest than their next meal or cot. (So, I guess people are different).

One thing a young drop-out who walks-away from a job, career, family and other traditional trappings of American life,needs to think about --- is that after a few years, they will likely be unable to get back-into the 'system.' I've known many young men whose decisions and lifestyles took them 'out of the mainstream' in their early 20's; ... and who later, found themselves trapped in meaningless lives by their lack of current skills, experience, education and roots.

At 20-30, these things may not seem like a big deal or even desirable, but, at 50 and beyond, ... well, one is no longer 20-30!
Both posts above are very astute and insightful. They skillfully get at the heart of the matter, so there is nothing more for me to add!
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