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Old 08-27-2014, 12:47 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,236,672 times
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I bounced between the mountain areas of AZ and NM for the longest time, and finally decided on AZ. Then my sister passed away.

Now I'm bouncing between MT, ID, and WY.
But I have a free place to use in AZ on the River for when I get cabin fever
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Old 08-27-2014, 01:51 PM
 
3,347 posts, read 3,051,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
I guess that depends upon your definition of very difficult. I looked into getting a Resident Visa for Retirees from Spain a while back and it didn't seem too difficult. Granted there is a lot of paperwork to submit, and you do have to show up in person at a consulate, but as long as you meet their minimum income threshold and have your own health insurance, it didn't seem to be a big problem. In fact, I thought that was the main issue with most European countries: they just want to ensure that you have independent income and health insurance. I thought if you met that criteria, you're in, but I didn't actually investigate the requirements of other EU countries.


http://www.exteriores.gob.es/Consula...rementVisa.pdf

France isn't that difficult either.

Long stay visa for non professional purpose "visitor visa" - Consulat Général de France à Washington

New Zealand is difficult if you don't have $750K minimum to invest there.
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Old 08-27-2014, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Toronto, Ottawa Valley & Dunedin FL
1,409 posts, read 2,355,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by volosong View Post
... another way might be, if one is able to become a citizen of any EU country, then they can freely move to any other EU country. So, establish residency/citizenship in an EU country with lax requirements . . . then move to England. Once a citizen of any Commonwealth country, you can go to any other Commonwealth country, including Australia, New Zealand, or even Canada. Really don't think I'll do that, it would take a long time, and regulations are always changing. But might be possible for someone who really wants to go.
That is not true. It may be easier for someone from the U.K. to immigrate to Canada, but it's not a breeze, and is still a lengthy process.

Someone mentioned medical insurance--none of these European countries are going to give you free medical care in their countries. Anywhere in Europe, you are going to have to provide your own medical care or insurance, and lots of our policies here in N.A. are not transferable--our Canadian plan definitely is not, and my travel plan still favours repatriation to Canada in many circumstances so that wouldn't work. Not sure about Medicare, but I'm guessing it's no good outside the U.S. either.

So not sure how you would go about buying policies for these countries, if you were a permanent resident.

In other parts of the world it will be different. In some places like Thailand you can just pay up front for medical care and get good care at reasonable cost, I believe. In some South/Central American countries where you can actually immigrate as a pensioner, with the appropriate income, I believe you can sign on to their government health plans (not sure.)
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Old 08-27-2014, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Idaho
4,628 posts, read 4,470,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wwanderer View Post
That is not true. It may be easier for someone from the U.K. to immigrate to Canada, but it's not a breeze, and is still a lengthy process.

Someone mentioned medical insurance...
Thanks for the clarification. All this stuff is an ongoing learning process.

You are correct in that Medicare will not cover anyone outside the country. I'm already set for medical coverage, so that's one less thing to worry about.
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Old 08-27-2014, 04:29 PM
 
673 posts, read 2,029,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by volosong View Post
My impressions also. It is almost trivial to get a visa to stay for six months. Longer than that and you have to start jumping through hoops. So, conceivably it is possible to live somewhere in the EU, even purchase a home, and live like a local for six months at which time you need to leave the country, (and get a passport stamp from somewhere else to "prove" you left the country). Then, you can come back for another six months. What I'm not sure of is how long one have to stay out of the country before returning for another six-month stay.

And, maybe there is a loophole in getting to Oz or New Zealand. You can get certainly move to those countries as a retiree . . . if you have a boatload of money. Pretty much anyone will take you if you have money to burn, a lot of money. Since most people don't have that type of funds, another way might be, if one is able to become a citizen of any EU country, then they can freely move to any other EU country. So, establish residency/citizenship in an EU country with lax requirements . . . then move to England. Once a citizen of any Commonwealth country, you can go to any other Commonwealth country, including Australia, New Zealand, or even Canada. Really don't think I'll do that, it would take a long time, and regulations are always changing. But might be possible for someone who really wants to go.
I'm sorry to say that all of this info is not true. sorry!
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Old 08-27-2014, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Maui, Hawaii
679 posts, read 617,917 times
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We have lived all over the place inside and outside of the US and found what we enjoyed and did not enjoy. We settled on a place that had Most of the things we liked but no place or lifestyle is perfect.

I will say though that as we have grown older, less is more....smaller home, wardrobe, piles of 'stuff' to clean and maintain, smaller group of friends, etc. For us it just makes life easier overall to have 'downsized' in nearly every aspect of our lives.
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Old 08-27-2014, 06:18 PM
 
Location: St. George, Utah
756 posts, read 884,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdr22 View Post
We have lived all over the place inside and outside of the US and found what we enjoyed and did not enjoy. We settled on a place that had Most of the things we liked but no place or lifestyle is perfect.

I will say though that as we have grown older, less is more....smaller home, wardrobe, piles of 'stuff' to clean and maintain, smaller group of friends, etc. For us it just makes life easier overall to have 'downsized' in nearly every aspect of our lives.
That is one thing this somewhat painful process of choosing a "perfect" location has done for us--we are being forced to distill our priorities and it has affected my thinking across the board. I am much more open to downsizing (though it's not my first inclination in the literal sense--I love a big house--just less stuff). I am much more willing to let "things" go. (Just had a huge garage sale last month). I have a short list of furniture items I'd like to keep (like, 3 items), and other than those and photos, I could walk away from all of it. Home really isn't this house, or the stuff in it, I've decided in the process of this search. You can't really know what a departure in thinking that is for me.

I love visiting our place in Phoenix. It's relatively sparsely furnished, it's tiny but comfortable, and just the necessities as far as "stuff". And of course, being in a warmer climate without a job means fewer clothes, and a huge downsize in the shoe department (flip flops only!).

In that way, "bouncing around", whether mentally or in actual physical moves, could be really cleansing for some, I think.
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Old 08-27-2014, 06:53 PM
 
11,269 posts, read 8,436,427 times
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Dream on. No harm. I'm still bouncing.
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Old 08-27-2014, 09:34 PM
 
255 posts, read 233,821 times
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Everywhere we go in the US I start researching home prices and cost-of-living calculators wondering what it would be like to live there. I've done this for all of the 43 years I've been married.

Right now I am happy living near Seattle and one of my sons for the majority of the year and traveling to our small condo near Phoenix during the winter months.
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Old 08-27-2014, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,407 posts, read 21,249,654 times
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One of the issues that has helped restrict my choices is living in the desert for 21 years, as I couldn't tolerate, now, heat & humidity both, flies, mosquito's, gnats, woodticks and other insects, which I term terrorists, ruling out any locale in SE Asia! Another issue, I'm super-sensitive to noise!

I did 5 "eye-balling" trips to Central America, a half-dozen to South America the last 10 years "shopping", so to speak, even got to talk to some ex-pats along the way. Sound advice from an ex-pat in Ecuador: If you're the restless type, come with a plan, as you can't even get a dishwasher job here, but they'll allow you to open a business, which she did and her ex-pat friend as well. And the unwarranted Latin American noise, another deterrent. I woke up enough mornings at 4-5am by roosters! One small city in El Salvador, evangelical churches blaring their music/sermons all over town 'til midnight!

When I went shopping for a house in Tijuana/Rosarito, a salesman said: I love being in Mexico! Someone has a loud party some night, no one calls the police!

It's the climate that caught my attention for Portugal, or any other local with a Mediterranean climate where I wouldn't be colliding head-on with enervating humidity. My body has grown too accustomed to 5-10% humidity! Raise the humidity level to 50% or above, and I go crashing to the sidewalk!

Square One, Tucson, only 60 miles to Mexico, where I can hop a bus in Nogales, and 4 hours later I'm in Guaymas/San Carlos, on the ocean. Grit my teeth, a longer bus ride to Mazatlan! I've also done my fair share of medical/dental tourism in Mexico/Tijuana, over the years, so there's one more plus for Tucson and the pharmacies. The new eco-friendly Ventolin's in this country, $45 on a co-pay, 3 for $14 I recently paid in Mexico!

I still flirt heavily with the idea of Rosarito Beach/Tijuana, best reason: you can live in a foreign country, and you're a short hop away from the medical facilities in San Diego, should the need arise.

But I'm sure there'll be more dreaming before I pack that U-Haul for Tucson!
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