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Old 08-28-2014, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,019 posts, read 895,028 times
Reputation: 736

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The World’s 9 Most Affordable Places to Retire

Quote:
Dumaguete, Philippines

Monthly budget: $1,000

In addition to its welcoming, friendly, English-speaking people, Dumaguete boasts a warm, tropical climate and lots of opportunity for outdoor adventures, including world-class diving and snorkeling and whale and dolphin watching.

Dumaguete sits right along the ocean, with attractive beaches to the north and south of town. This is also a university city, meaning an abundance of inexpensive restaurants that cater to “starving” college students. Foreigners have the opportunity to make friends with educated professors and aspiring students, take classes and enjoy cultural opportunities not typically found elsewhere in the Philippines, including theater, ballet, art shows and libraries.

Medical and dental care is good, with a new hospital under construction and international-standard health care available in nearby Cebu.
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Old 08-28-2014, 08:33 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,463,318 times
Reputation: 29071
These lists seem to proliferate but everywhere they highlight the same problem exists. They're not my country. Add to that such issues as political instability, communist government, restrictive policies, etc., and I'm happy to be home. Visit, yes. Live there, not hardly.
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Old 08-28-2014, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,842,106 times
Reputation: 6377
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
These lists seem to proliferate but everywhere they highlight the same problem exists. They're not my country. Add to that such issues as political instability, communist government, restrictive policies, etc., and I'm happy to be home. Visit, yes. Live there, not hardly.

Yesserie God Bless the USofA. Visit the other countries but live here.

All of the lists be it global or national for best places to retire in are nice for a start. Read them with a grain of salt. Pick a few to visit. Check off items that are on your lists of needs wants and desires. Visit more to add to the overall list. Get together with your significant other and come to an agreement to test or actually move there. Some can take the plunge with no more thought then to just go where others need to test and try on areas. Which ever anyone is I feel that you should not wring your hands in desperation but use it as a fun time learning and enjoying the time in new and exotic places.
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Old 08-28-2014, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,849 posts, read 7,793,965 times
Reputation: 9469
I mentioned earlier that we semi-seriously scoped out San Miguel de Allende, a charming small city in the mountains of central Mexico, as a place to retire. While we found it beautiful, we discovered a dynamic we hadn't considered. The city is a popular retirement spot for Americans and Canadians. So much so that there is an English language tabloid-style paper that is produced regularly there. We picked up a copy and noticed lots of events and activities underway in the town for ex pats. It was also "name-heavy." So-and-so was running for library board and this list of residents was endorsing him/her. So-and-so was sponsoring this fund-drive and these folks were contributing. Another so-and-so was opening a musical and these folks were involved. On the surface, it sounded good that there was a place to quickly connect with a community. That is, until we realized, "Hey, this could easily become high school." While the city population is around 150,000, the ex pat community is a small fraction of that. I'm sure among this community there are the "popular kids," the "cutest couple," the "hostess with the mostest" along with those who have committed some sort of social faux pas never to be forgiven (or forgotten). Life in a fishbowl has never been for us and retirement didn't seem like a good time to take it up.

I wrote earlier in this thread that we retired to Philly, so obviously an ex pat life was not for us. That said, the only way I would consider it would be to be fluid in the language. That not only opens up the possibilities for a wider social circle, it permits a person to better immerse themselves in the local culture as opposed to viewing it from the outside.
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:08 AM
 
Location: St. George, Utah
756 posts, read 882,835 times
Reputation: 1971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
I mentioned earlier that we semi-seriously scoped out San Miguel de Allende, a charming small city in the mountains of central Mexico, as a place to retire. While we found it beautiful, we discovered a dynamic we hadn't considered. The city is a popular retirement spot for Americans and Canadians. So much so that there is an English language tabloid-style paper that is produced regularly there. We picked up a copy and noticed lots of events and activities underway in the town for ex pats. It was also "name-heavy." So-and-so was running for library board and this list of residents was endorsing him/her. So-and-so was sponsoring this fund-drive and these folks were contributing. Another so-and-so was opening a musical and these folks were involved. On the surface, it sounded good that there was a place to quickly connect with a community. That is, until we realized, "Hey, this could easily become high school." While the city population is around 150,000, the ex pat community is a small fraction of that. I'm sure among this community there are the "popular kids," the "cutest couple," the "hostess with the mostest" along with those who have committed some sort of social faux pas never to be forgiven (or forgotten). Life in a fishbowl has never been for us and retirement didn't seem like a good time to take it up.

I wrote earlier in this thread that we retired to Philly, so obviously an ex pat life was not for us. That said, the only way I would consider it would be to be fluid in the language. That not only opens up the possibilities for a wider social circle, it permits a person to better immerse themselves in the local culture as opposed to viewing it from the outside.
We heard very similar accounts, and common sense would tell me that's true. In fact it happens to a greater or lesser degree at many age-restricted communities here in the states from what we have learned as well. It was one of the factors that helped us decide on a "regular" neighborhood for our future retirement home.

My Spanish is in there somewhere, but I'm never going to be "fluent" to the degree that I could connect as well as I'd like in a Spanish-speaking community. And if I'm not going to immerse myself in the culture, what is the point of retiring to a foreign country? (The above-described ex-pat social pecking order doesn't sound like our kind of thing.) For us, cost of living and climate were the two big draws, but we found that by the time we factor in travel costs for family visits, the cost of the move itself, and the fact that the COL for ex-pats turns out not to be exactly what the COL for locals might be....we didn't feel like the savings justified the distance.

We'd have to be really drawn to a place to live abroad long term, as we came to the conclusion that it's a huge compromise. As I said, I could give up a lot for Scotland or the Caymans....I just don't think I could choose a foreign retirement location for financial or climate reasons alone. My heart would really have to be in it.

OTOH, we did choose a very typical retirement location in Phoenix, and there's an upside to that built-in community as well. Even in our mixed-age development, we are surrounded by folks very similar to ourselves--recently relocated, nearing retirement or in retirement, chose Phoenix for many of the same reasons we did, etc. There's a lot to talk about from the get-go. There are activities for the planned community if we choose to participate--groups, clubs, sports, and community-wide gatherings. Since we are not super outgoing people (I'd say we're reasonably social, we just don't find it easy to "put ourselves out there") this makes settling in a lot easier on us. I know if we were to reconsider Philadelphia and make that move, it would require a lot more effort on our parts to be social than it does in a community of retirees or second-home owners like Phoenix, Florida coast, etc. Just depends on your personality whether that's a plus or a minus.

Last edited by Montanama; 08-28-2014 at 11:49 AM..
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
352 posts, read 248,679 times
Reputation: 815
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
I'm beginning to wonder if these scatter brained ideas come with age. I seem to be dead set on retiring in Tucson next year, and then along comes a National Geographic magazine, a Travel magazine, with a particular feature, and I'm off to the races veering 90/180/360 degrees away from Tucson.

I just read a feature on the SW coast of Portugal in a Travel magazine, and there I go, dreaming, scheming, investigating, could it be possible? Stop it!!! Stop it!!!

And then there's the schemes and dreams of retiring somewhere in Mexico, or as far away as Greece. Sheesh!

As they say: choice is agony, choicelessness is freedom! I so agree with that!

At any rate, it triggers some exciting fantasies at times!

How about you? Ever go through this agony? Or are you one of these lucky types with tunnel vision?
Well, my plans will depend on the family situation I am in at that point.

I have been planning my retirement since High School, hence why I went into retirement planning as a profession, and now that I'm in my 30s I am a bit more settled in to my location.

That said, I see the cost of living in California (I currently live in San Diego, might relocate to Silicon Valley or San Francisco eventually) being quite high and being a detractor from my retirement lifestyle. So my eyes start to look at places like Mexico, Costa Rica, Belize, etc. as options because I speak Spanish. Then I start to think about living the European lifestyle in a place like Antwerpen or Napoli.

Of course, if I end up with $100,000,000+ in the bank, then I'll just buy myself an Island (that's not constantly in danger of natural disasters) and make my own little country to live in.
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:26 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,463,318 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
Yesserie God Bless the USofA. Visit the other countries but live here.

All of the lists be it global or national for best places to retire in are nice for a start. Read them with a grain of salt. Pick a few to visit. Check off items that are on your lists of needs wants and desires. Visit more to add to the overall list. Get together with your significant other and come to an agreement to test or actually move there. Some can take the plunge with no more thought then to just go where others need to test and try on areas. Which ever anyone is I feel that you should not wring your hands in desperation but use it as a fun time learning and enjoying the time in new and exotic places.
Precisely. Given that we have, between us, seven children in two states and soon-to-be 14 grandchildren in three states and we belong here. I've lived in nine states and three other countries, mostly thanks to Uncle Sam and for the same reason my wife has lived in five states and one other country. Our move to where we are now was our last one and we're content. The other countries were mostly fun but not for the long-haul.
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:28 AM
 
Location: SW US
2,216 posts, read 2,032,891 times
Reputation: 3809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nausikaa View Post
What these travel magazines fail to tell you is that you just can't up and move to Portugal, France, Greece, UK, etc, without a visa. Getting a visa is very difficult. Unless you have an EU passport (i.e. dual citizenship), you won't be moving to Europe. If you live there under the radar (without a visa), then you will have no health insurance, etc.
Having researched this extensively, mainly for France and Spain, I will say that it is possible for retired Americans to get long stay visas for those countries. It takes some effort and lots of paperwork, but it can be done. And you won't get health insurance as a retiree unless you buy it. Medicare only pays in the US and there is no reciprocity.
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:30 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,527 posts, read 39,903,732 times
Reputation: 23629
Quote:
Originally Posted by HedgeYourInvestments View Post
Well, my plans will depend on the family situation I am in at that point....

Of course, if I end up with $100,000,000+ in the bank, then I'll just buy myself an Island...
no need to be a high achiever (a California plague).

$10k will buy you a decent island,

I retired for the second time while in my 30's

Retire early, retire often!

Caution... the International naysayers are back...(as usual) (Why can't they stay in their USA planted garden and let a discussion evolve, and not be centered around their social need of PROJECTION (protection of self-importance)) So many better places to contribute their 'wisdom'.
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Old 08-28-2014, 11:45 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,463,318 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
no need to be a high achiever (a California plague).

Caution... the International naysayers are back...(as usual) (Why can't they stay in their USA planted garden and let a discussion evolve, and not be centered around their social need of PROJECTION (protection of self-importance)) So many better places to contribute their 'wisdom'.
We're not all the same, nor all judgmental. We all have different likes and dislikes, different experiences, different points of view and different perspectives to offer., Why can't some accept that and realize that some people might benefit from other's take on the subject less superiority posts? Why can't they live where and how they want and let others do the same minus the put-downs?
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