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Old 09-09-2014, 10:15 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,802 posts, read 7,109,684 times
Reputation: 14413

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Certainly you've heard of the phrase "semi-retired". The poster to whom you were responding said he works ten hours a week. There is a world of difference between having a full-time job and working ten hours a week. That poster is more retired than not, in terms of finances, work load, amount of free time, etc. Does the term "semi-retired" do the trick for you, or do you wish to continue the semantic hair-splitting?
Technically, I guess one could split those hairs till there is nothing left, but according to the federal government, one needs to be "retired" (and have reached the applicable ages) to collect Social Security and Medicare- even if one works either part or full time after started to receive these. I'm not talking about being on SSI or on Medicare because one has an eligible chronic medical condition.

Semi-retired sounds about right, if you want to put a label on working while collecting an SS check/Medicare. But that's your term, not the federal government's. To illustrate, I got into somewhat of a conundrum when I first got on Medicare, and it had to do with whether or not they considered me "retired". I had retired from my last job when I was almost 64, and applied for Medicare a year later. I applied over the phone with an SS/Medicare employee. The guy asked me if I was working at all, and I explained that I do some contract work as an educational consultant from home, mostly via the internet, and he explained the income restrictions for collecting SS before one hits full retirement age. So the guy apparently entered my information as "working". That might not have mattered, but it affected my Medicare status. We had secondary health insurance from my husband's employer- he took it with him when he retired, but Medicare was supposed to be primary. But since I was listed as "working", Medicare for me was set up as the secondary insurance and the health insurance as primary. But it seems both the insurance and Medicare thought they were or should be secondary, and I had problems with claims for nearly a year until I figured out what had happened.

Took nearly a day or so, calls to both Medicare and the insurance company, and a wait of about two months to straighten this out. But a Medicare employee told me that my listed status as "working" had been the problem, that it needed to be "retired" (even with the part-time work) in order for Medicare to become the primary carrier.

So I am "retired", even with the part-time work I do.
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Old 09-09-2014, 10:27 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,802 posts, read 7,109,684 times
Reputation: 14413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
I should also have included the phrase "some weeks" in my working schedule info. I didn't work at all last week because I visited friends a long ways away. If I have other stuff to do, I don't work. They are glad to have me for whatever time I can spare. When us old people retire we take decades of experience and expertise with us. It's not hard to find a position where work consists of writing training manuals and teaching an organization how to do things efficiently.
That's similar to what I do. I have projects ( continuing education courses for medical personnel) that I work on and submit the finished products via email and snail mail when applicable when I am finished with them. So although it does take a fair amount of time when I'm trying to get through a project, I can put it down anytime I have something else I need to do, or even just want a break. I've worked with the company for 15 years now ( did it at night in my pj's, to a lesser extent when I worked a full time job that kept me hopping for too many hours in the day) and my employers have always been happy with the pace of the work- as well as the work itself.

It's the best of both worlds, IMO.
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Old 09-09-2014, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,883,145 times
Reputation: 6393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
Technically, I guess one could split those hairs till there is nothing left, but according to the federal government, one needs to be "retired" (and have reached the applicable ages) to collect Social Security and Medicare- even if one works either part or full time after started to receive these. I'm not talking about being on SSI or on Medicare because one has an eligible chronic medical condition.

Semi-retired sounds about right, if you want to put a label on working while collecting an SS check/Medicare. But that's your term, not the federal government's. To illustrate, I got into somewhat of a conundrum when I first got on Medicare, and it had to do with whether or not they considered me "retired". I had retired from my last job when I was almost 64, and applied for Medicare a year later. I applied over the phone with an SS/Medicare employee. The guy asked me if I was working at all, and I explained that I do some contract work as an educational consultant from home, mostly via the internet, and he explained the income restrictions for collecting SS before one hits full retirement age. So the guy apparently entered my information as "working". That might not have mattered, but it affected my Medicare status. We had secondary health insurance from my husband's employer- he took it with him when he retired, but Medicare was supposed to be primary. But since I was listed as "working", Medicare for me was set up as the secondary insurance and the health insurance as primary. But it seems both the insurance and Medicare thought they were or should be secondary, and I had problems with claims for nearly a year until I figured out what had happened.

Took nearly a day or so, calls to both Medicare and the insurance company, and a wait of about two months to straighten this out. But a Medicare employee told me that my listed status as "working" had been the problem, that it needed to be "retired" (even with the part-time work) in order for Medicare to become the primary carrier.

So I am "retired", even with the part-time work I do.
Excellent post. Thank you for sharing that story. It will I hope be a lesson to people in similar circumstances.
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