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Old 09-10-2014, 01:54 PM
 
Location: St. George, Utah
756 posts, read 885,255 times
Reputation: 1971

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Yes, I understand that. But there are cities that are better than others depending upon the individual's likes. I don't understand why people think those that move around are miserable. I learned a lot about the country. More than most.
I get that you get that. I was responding to those on the thread who think it's silly, or some kind of a weakness of character, to place importance on WHERE you live, not just how you live. And I understand what they're saying and that they feel differently about "place" than I do. I also understand that there are many people who are always looking for a new spot to fix everything that's gone wrong in their lives to that point.

The physical place of "home" is a factor in my happiness. (This is scenery, culture, geographical features, access to opportunities and amenities, demographics, for me) For some people it just isn't a factor, or it's less important. For me it's a big deal....and I just don't think there's anything wrong with that as long as we're not looking for a change of scenery to fix everything. That's not what I'm after, and it doesn't seem to be what you're after either, OP.

I do appreciate the meaning of "Bloom where you're planted," as I've said. And I have, to the extent I am able. But the next person who says it to me today, at 42 degrees, spitting rain, and windy...
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Old 09-10-2014, 02:09 PM
 
Location: The Carolinas
2,008 posts, read 2,022,107 times
Reputation: 6104
My wife and myself are from "up north" a ways. We got tired of the cold and snow, but we still like having 4 seasons. We decided to move down to the Carolinas while we were still both working and had money coming in and could afford the move and were still young enough to make the move. We're all settled now, and as we make the final push toward retirement, we're stashing as much cash as we can, then we'll "pull the plug".

So, my advice is to "make hay while the sun shines", travel the country a bit to see what's out there and where you might want to retire, keep the pencil sharp and stash cash, try to move while you might have some $$$$ coming in, get settled, THEN pull the plug.
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Old 09-10-2014, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Wyandotte Mi
13 posts, read 11,875 times
Reputation: 29
Default Good Climate Low Crime and Good Health Care

I think that the 3 most important things are the climate, crime rates, and access to quality healthcare. Not to mention how close the home improvement centers and Krogers are.
One thing about moving to the suburbs, or just a typical city or town is that people have different reasons for being there. Could be work, schools, on and on
But when you move to a area, whether it be a Golfing community or a area near the Ocean most people are there for the very same reason. To enjoy and make the most of their golden years. And it is Bliss
If you think grandchildren will be in your future you may want to retire somewhere that has fun things for kids to do when they visit.
Another thing to consider, depending on where your retirement income is coming from, is what states tax pensions and Social Security Income. All states are different and it will make a difference unless money is not a factor and if thats the case just head on over to the breezy side of Hawaii and Live it Up!!
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Old 09-10-2014, 05:06 PM
 
10,819 posts, read 8,077,208 times
Reputation: 17034
Quote:
Originally Posted by crashcarts View Post
I think that the 3 most important things are the climate, crime rates, and access to quality healthcare. Not to mention how close the home improvement centers and Krogers are.
That's not helpful for the OP, since it's impossible to predict these factors 2-3 decades out.
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Old 09-10-2014, 05:12 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,093 posts, read 13,245,924 times
Reputation: 14870
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
I can't decide on a location. I have done a ton of research and have experience living across the country. I am still reasonably young and would like to find a forever home. A place to finally settle down. Do you have the same problem? Can't lock down a particular city?

I have moved a lot in my life and would like to only do another major move one last time. I want to be established by retirement age. But stuck on making a decision.
Don't stress over finding a particular city now.
Find your area first.

I've posted this before ... get a map and put it on your wall. Get a black marker. "X" out any city or state or area you are not interested in for whatever reason. Then start researching the areas that are left. Keep X-ing out as time goes by. Keep researching.
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Old 09-10-2014, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,569,320 times
Reputation: 29034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montanama View Post
... Next spring and summer we'll visit Florida (probably panhandle Gulf Coast) and North Carolina to check out some beach locations....I think Florida may be too humid, and NC may be too isolated ...
How do you figure NC is "too isolated"? I used to live in Washington, DC, and I went to a concert in North Carolina once and drove back afterward in plenty of time for work the next day. Granted, I can think of lots of reasons not to live in either of the Carolinas, but isolation isn't one of them. You're on the East Coast, you have the Atlantic ocean, the Great Smokey Mountains, major cities (including one of the nation's banking centers), rolling countryside, several national forests, good airports, pro sports, and well-respected universities within a day's drive of any part of the state.
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Old 09-10-2014, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Wyandotte Mi
13 posts, read 11,875 times
Reputation: 29
Default Just my 2 cents

Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
That's not helpful for the OP, since it's impossible to predict these factors 2-3 decades out.
Which was exactly my point...Dig
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Old 09-10-2014, 05:31 PM
 
Location: St. George, Utah
756 posts, read 885,255 times
Reputation: 1971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
Don't stress over finding a particular city now.
Find your area first.

I've posted this before ... get a map and put it on your wall. Get a black marker. "X" out any city or state or area you are not interested in for whatever reason. Then start researching the areas that are left. Keep X-ing out as time goes by. Keep researching.
I think this is great advice. Having a system of visual organization really helps keep you moving forward toward a goal--motivated--and also keeps your options clearly in front of you. I research a lot too, and if I don't keep it organized somehow I do end up repeating the work I've done. Not only in looking back at places I've already ruled out (forgetting sometimes WHY I ruled them out, if there was maybe a specific but not obvious reason). It's not a big deal--of course there's an element of fun in doing the research. But it's also nice to see your options in black and white. Traveling to the areas is time-consuming and expensive--I don't want my research to go to waste!

Surely you have some idea of what areas are absolute no-go's, right? Gandalara's idea is awesome, and I think I'm going to try it myself. Of course, my map will have to be heavily annotated, lol.

I say we're all over the map, but I do have it narrowed to my "fantasy" region (beach areas I probably can't afford and other spots I've always loved but probably aren't great for retirement), my "target" regions in FL and NC, and our "backup" regions which include keeping a home base in MT and keeping our place in Phoenix for-evah....I can live with any of these for sure, but I'm still hopeful that there will be a beach in my future before I'm too decrepit to enjoy it!

Quote:
That's not helpful for the OP, since it's impossible to predict these factors
2-3 decades out.
Since the OP is hoping to find the right spot now and stay there well into the future, these factors need to be considered as they are in the present. No, there's no way to predict how things will go in 20 years for sure, but there are some pretty solid indicators in most places for economic outlook which would often be tied to crime rates as well.
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Old 09-10-2014, 06:30 PM
 
Location: St. George, Utah
756 posts, read 885,255 times
Reputation: 1971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
How do you figure NC is "too isolated"? I used to live in Washington, DC, and I went to a concert in North Carolina once and drove back afterward in plenty of time for work the next day. Granted, I can think of lots of reasons not to live in either of the Carolinas, but isolation isn't one of them. You're on the East Coast, you have the Atlantic ocean, the Great Smokey Mountains, major cities (including one of the nation's banking centers), rolling countryside, several national forests, good airports, pro sports, and well-respected universities within a day's drive of any part of the state.
It's great to have available daytrips, but we are looking at daily life, "home" life, and one of our criteria is being within an hour of a major city (to include a major airport, and activities, for the occasions we need those things) and within 30 minutes of medical facilities and general shopping (for daily convenience). What's within a day's drive is pretty far down the list of our considerations (and mountains would be at the bottom, beautiful as I find the Smokies, lol. I'm not really much of a mountain girl when it comes right down to it.) It's what I will be doing and enjoying every day that is my current focus.

The NC coast is a very large area (so is the FL panhandle for that matter) and the towns we are interested in (largely because we can afford them) are not close to major cities (that's part of why they are affordable). Some aren't close to much of anything! (Outer Banks) They have the beach. We have been warned it might not be enough to keep us there long term, but obviously we are interested enough to keep it on the short list.

That's all "isolated" means in terms of our search. Long drives for daily activities is not how I want to live.

Even some of the towns we're most interested in in Florida would be considered "isolated" by that definition.

It's like someone was discussing on another thread--one needs a spreadsheet to weight each factor in making these decisions! This is how the process goes--defining priorities, weighting those priorities, and deciding what one can live with, and what one can live without.
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Old 09-10-2014, 06:33 PM
 
5,710 posts, read 8,775,783 times
Reputation: 4928
Montanama, I see you on the Oregon coast. A leetle over an hour to Portland and perhaps close enough for the kids to drive for a long weekend. You want seasons? go to Montana and visit them.

No NC is not isolated but it will be isolated for you while the kids live in MT.

On edit: yes the outer banks are isolated. True dat.
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