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Old 09-11-2014, 06:26 PM
 
5,729 posts, read 8,802,256 times
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Quote:
assuming beach property values do not rise more quickly
Ha! it may be the ocean that rises more quickly. Especially after one of those Antarctic ice shelves drops off into the ocean. So buying a bit inland could be your best investment long term.
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Old 09-14-2014, 12:05 AM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,618 posts, read 14,406,093 times
Reputation: 23707
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Don't even think about what being a 60something might mean until you are one.Well, at least not beyond saving and investing well so you'll have more choices.
Not my style at all.
By the time I retire I want to have a circle of friends and neighbors that I know, not strangers all around me. I want to be familiar with the healthcare system and my providers if my health starts failing as I get older. I want to know the roads like the back of my hand and not be fearful of going out to explore things to do with my new found free time, and hopefully have a good friend to do it with. I want to know where all the seniors go for their morning coffee and gossip, lol. I don't like the thought of suddenly having a lot of time and not knowing anyone or really truly 'knowing' anything about where I'm suddenly living, it just seems like a recipe for frustration or depression.
With that in mind I moved about 5 yrs ago, with another 10-12 yrs to go before retirement. So far I'm extremely happy with my decision. Barring a major climate change I think this is it for me, maybe one more small move, to possibly find a slightly more 'fitting' neighborhood now that I've found my city.

As far as 'Bloom where you're planted'- obviously not said by a gardener.
It's great to make the best of wherever you are and not focus on the negatives but let's be honest, if you absolutely love to ski and you wind up in Indiana, and don't have the money to travel, you are not going to 'bloom'. A beach bunny in Kansas is not likely to bloom either, nor is a city lover likely to bloom in rural podunk Mississippi. Just as certain plants do better in the right environment I believe people do too.

OP maybe it would be easier to focus first on what you don't want whittle it down that way. That's what I did, eventually narrowing down to a small region and then doing in depth research on maybe a half dozen cities and towns in that region.
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Old 09-14-2014, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Buckeye
601 posts, read 718,831 times
Reputation: 1389
Very interesting discussion here folks. I also have gone back and forth and then back again considering several locations. We've considered AZ, FL, AR, OR, WA and CA. Everyone has their criteria which to filter results. We're about 2 to 4 years out and in my opinion the OP is doing this right. Why not try to design the life we want for the future? True, of course, that life is what happens while your making plans but planning the future is a big part of the enjoyment. There are people posting here that I admire: Jukegrrl, Montanama, DoubleT to name a few. When I see thoughtful, positive approaches to this issue it enriches my own planning process. I can say that today I don't think I'm any closer to a final decision than when I began months ago. We've even thought of a motor home or fifth wheel and going full time, traveling until some place just jumps out at us as home (I did full-time for 3 years over a decade ago).
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Old 09-14-2014, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,034,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Not my style at all.
By the time I retire I want to have a circle of friends and neighbors that I know, not strangers all around me. I want to be familiar with the healthcare system and my providers if my health starts failing as I get older. I want to know the roads like the back of my hand and not be fearful of going out to explore things to do with my new found free time, and hopefully have a good friend to do it with. I want to know where all the seniors go for their morning coffee and gossip, lol. I don't like the thought of suddenly having a lot of time and not knowing anyone or really truly 'knowing' anything about where I'm suddenly living, it just seems like a recipe for frustration or depression.
With that in mind I moved about 5 yrs ago, with another 10-12 yrs to go before retirement. So far I'm extremely happy with my decision. Barring a major climate change I think this is it for me, maybe one more small move, to possibly find a slightly more 'fitting' neighborhood now that I've found my city.

As far as 'Bloom where you're planted'- obviously not said by a gardener.
It's great to make the best of wherever you are and not focus on the negatives but let's be honest, if you absolutely love to ski and you wind up in Indiana, and don't have the money to travel, you are not going to 'bloom'. A beach bunny in Kansas is not likely to bloom either, nor is a city lover likely to bloom in rural podunk Mississippi. Just as certain plants do better in the right environment I believe people do too.

OP maybe it would be easier to focus first on what you don't want whittle it down that way. That's what I did, eventually narrowing down to a small region and then doing in depth research on maybe a half dozen cities and towns in that region.
Good perspective.

There are so many complicating factors, family being up there near the top (if you cherish family). That they are fixed forever in the spot you're now in, or that they may move, etc influences many as to their retirement move.

Where I am now is lovely but it doesn't suit me as it once did. It is not my "ideal spot." To achieve that I would be giving up proximity to family, and that's what's holding up the works. Waiting for the grandkids to get into school isn't practical when you're 66 and counting.

I still like the spreadsheet approach. Take the top ten must-haves and those are the columns across. Then list the ten places down the first column that could work for you. Put a dot in the cells associated with each place and amenity. Those that show the most dots are the winners, at least rationally. (Do we really want to act rationally, or from the heart, lol).
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Old 09-14-2014, 08:49 AM
 
Location: St. George, Utah
756 posts, read 887,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Good perspective.

There are so many complicating factors, family being up there near the top (if you cherish family). That they are fixed forever in the spot you're now in, or that they may move, etc influences many as to their retirement move.

Where I am now is lovely but it doesn't suit me as it once did. It is not my "ideal spot." To achieve that I would be giving up proximity to family, and that's what's holding up the works. Waiting for the grandkids to get into school isn't practical when you're 66 and counting.

I still like the spreadsheet approach. Take the top ten must-haves and those are the columns across. Then list the ten places down the first column that could work for you. Put a dot in the cells associated with each place and amenity. Those that show the most dots are the winners, at least rationally. (Do we really want to act rationally, or from the heart, lol).

Well, that's the rub, isn't it? My practical side and my "dreamer" side are often in conflict on this subject. And yes, family is THE complicating factor in this process, though I wouldn't generally describe them that way. I want them to be happy and "home" too. I want to be near them. But I really can't stay in the place I've raised them, lol. Poor planning on my part if you ask me, and it would be infinitely easier in the long run and smarter to do things the way OP is deciding to do them!

Quote:

Not my style at all.


By the time I retire I want to have a circle of friends and neighbors that I
know, not strangers all around me. I want to be familiar with the healthcare
system and my providers if my health starts failing as I get older. I want to
know the roads like the back of my hand and not be fearful of going out to
explore things to do with my new found free time, and hopefully have a good
friend to do it with. I want to know where all the seniors go for their morning
coffee and gossip, lol. I don't like the thought of suddenly having a lot of
time and not knowing anyone or really truly 'knowing' anything about where I'm
suddenly living, it just seems like a recipe for frustration or depression.


With that in mind I moved about 5 yrs ago, with another 10-12 yrs to go
before retirement. So far I'm extremely happy with my decision. Barring a major
climate change I think this is it for me, maybe one more small move, to possibly
find a slightly more 'fitting' neighborhood now that I've found my city.


As far as 'Bloom where you're planted'- obviously not said by a gardener.


It's great to make the best of wherever you are and not focus on the
negatives but let's be honest, if you absolutely love to ski and you wind up in
Indiana, and don't have the money to travel, you are not going to 'bloom'. A
beach bunny in Kansas is not likely to bloom either, nor is a city lover likely
to bloom in rural podunk Mississippi. Just as certain plants do better in the
right environment I believe people do too.

OP maybe it would be easier to focus first on what you don't want whittle it
down that way. That's what I did, eventually narrowing down to a small region
and then doing in depth research on maybe a half dozen cities and towns in that
region
.

DubbleT, you say it so much more clearly and concisely than I'm able. I hope this helps the OP as much as it has helped me clarify my thoughts today! I think for some, arriving in a new place with all new people and activities sounds like great fun! As you say, not my style.

OP, what are some of the regions you're considering, vs. those you've ruled out?

Last edited by Montanama; 09-14-2014 at 08:58 AM..
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Old 09-14-2014, 11:41 AM
 
29,908 posts, read 34,970,994 times
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Current article from CNBC today.
Retirees' big move (or not): Here's what to consider

Quote:
Should I stay or should I go? Many people nearing retirement grapple with this decision. Choosing whether to retire "in place" or move to a new location could make or break your nest egg. There are many factors to consider, from expenses associated with the relocation to your cost of living in a new place.
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Old 09-14-2014, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,596,445 times
Reputation: 29034
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montanama View Post
It's great to have available daytrips, but we are looking at daily life, "home" life, and one of our criteria is being within an hour of a major city (to include a major airport, and activities, for the occasions we need those things) and within 30 minutes of medical facilities and general shopping (for daily convenience). What's within a day's drive is pretty far down the list of our considerations (and mountains would be at the bottom, beautiful as I find the Smokies, lol. I'm not really much of a mountain girl when it comes right down to it.) It's what I will be doing and enjoying every day that is my current focus.

The NC coast is a very large area (so is the FL panhandle for that matter) and the towns we are interested in (largely because we can afford them) are not close to major cities (that's part of why they are affordable). Some aren't close to much of anything! (Outer Banks) They have the beach. We have been warned it might not be enough to keep us there long term, but obviously we are interested enough to keep it on the short list.

That's all "isolated" means in terms of our search. Long drives for daily activities is not how I want to live.

Even some of the towns we're most interested in in Florida would be considered "isolated" by that definition.

It's like someone was discussing on another thread--one needs a spreadsheet to weight each factor in making these decisions! This is how the process goes--defining priorities, weighting those priorities, and deciding what one can live with, and what one can live without.
Forget Oregon. If you want the sun, the beach, and all the amenities of urban life, why have you rejected California?
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Old 09-14-2014, 01:46 PM
 
4,579 posts, read 7,083,709 times
Reputation: 4239
I've posted a lot here over the years about moving after retiring and at one point, about 5-6 years from retirement, I thought I would be able to just get up and move right away after the big date. But now having a few more years under my belt and adjusting to my new lifestyle, which I love big time, I knew that there was no way I could tackle a big move right away. So I've renewed my lease for a year which will give me time to think about things from a different perspective now that I am actually retired, I'll know better how my budget will work after living with it for a year, understand better how my health insurance works, and enjoy my friends and current place for awhile since I have more time and energy than when I was working! My ideas about what I could handle in a new location have changed, and I realistically don't know if I could take the long, dreary winters like I thought I could, or did when I was a lot younger. I guess my point is that, at least for me personally, as I've aged a bit, I've also changed and not in a rush since it is a huge decision. So I've given myself some time and space before making the move and I'm very much at peace with it.
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Old 09-14-2014, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,795,112 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Not my style at all.
By the time I retire I want to have a circle of friends and neighbors that I know, not strangers all around me. I want to be familiar with the healthcare system and my providers if my health starts failing as I get older. I want to know the roads like the back of my hand and not be fearful of going out to explore things to do with my new found free time, and hopefully have a good friend to do it with. I want to know where all the seniors go for their morning coffee and gossip, lol. I don't like the thought of suddenly having a lot of time and not knowing anyone or really truly 'knowing' anything about where I'm suddenly living, it just seems like a recipe for frustration or depression.
With that in mind I moved about 5 yrs ago, with another 10-12 yrs to go before retirement. So far I'm extremely happy with my decision. Barring a major climate change I think this is it for me, maybe one more small move, to possibly find a slightly more 'fitting' neighborhood now that I've found my city.

As far as 'Bloom where you're planted'- obviously not said by a gardener.
It's great to make the best of wherever you are and not focus on the negatives but let's be honest, if you absolutely love to ski and you wind up in Indiana, and don't have the money to travel, you are not going to 'bloom'. A beach bunny in Kansas is not likely to bloom either, nor is a city lover likely to bloom in rural podunk Mississippi. Just as certain plants do better in the right environment I believe people do too.

OP maybe it would be easier to focus first on what you don't want whittle it down that way. That's what I did, eventually narrowing down to a small region and then doing in depth research on maybe a half dozen cities and towns in that region.
I agree with just about everything you wrote. Some very outgoing people can make a success of starting over at retirement age in a location where they know no one. But I don't think that represents the majority of us. I am not excessively shy, but I would find it daunting to move to a new location at age 60, or 65.

I have lived in several locations within the greater Los Angeles area continuously since 1966, and I feel fortunate that I always knew I wanted to stay here. So three and a half years BEFORE retirement I bought a town house in the L.A. area with the thought in mind that I would die here. Moving is a lot of work, and I wanted that to be my last move. Now, 13 years after buying the townhouse and nine years after retiring from full time work, I am still content with my decision.
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Old 09-14-2014, 02:57 PM
 
8,974 posts, read 5,180,448 times
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When I was married, I envisioned a retirement in which we would move to a locale and rent a place, staying for 6 months or so before moving on. I thought mostly we would do English speaking locales, or locales with a lot of American ex-pats. (I regret not having made more of an effort to learn conversational Spanish when I was younger). I thought we might spend our 50s that way, and then see. What fun!

The international version of that plan is off the table now. A new version involving national/state parks and a travel trailer has been born. Also, a home base. I don't mind shedding possessions, but want an actual piece of real estate waiting for me between jaunts.
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