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Old 06-27-2008, 08:50 AM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,060,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newhampshiregirl View Post
A few years ago my husband and I were dreaming of living in South Carolina. We were on a nice long vacation down there and checking things out. One thing I kept hearing from northern transplants is how the summer heat/humidity is so unbearable that you run from one air conditioned environment to another and can't really enjoy the outdoors. At least here in NH, even if the winter is cold and snowy, you can still go outside and enjoy yourself skiing, snowshoeing, walking, etc.
This is my preference. When it's cold, I just put on more clothes and go on my way. But the heat wipes me out and I spend more time inside. But I know more people who prefer mild winters and hot summers to cold.

Bugs? There are tons of bugs in the south, middle Atlantic, and up to New England. Just a fact of life.
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Old 06-27-2008, 01:22 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
531 posts, read 1,806,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TootsieWootsie View Post
Yes, property tax is so high as in Houston (which is like $19 per $1,000), but they don't tax income except for 5% on earnings from stocks, bonds and so forth.
Umm, NH is very coy about their tax situation. The 5% tax to which you refer is also on INTEREST. Yup, like on bank CDs or money market funds . I believe if you have your money in a NH or VT bank, it is exempt. But if it's interest from a bank headquartered in another state, you get to fork over 5%. And there's only a tiny personal and "geezer" exemption. It's as close to a flat tax as you'll find. Thus, for anyone with savings and investments--and that tends to be your retirees--NH can be a real shocker tax-wise.

Although I long to go back to my home (central NH), the tax situation, the fuel costs (and you'll not be chopping/hauling wood when you're old and arthritic), and the currently high cost of housing all put me off.

Now if the cost of installing solar panels and geothermal heating becomes more reasonable....
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Old 06-27-2008, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,718 posts, read 49,511,045 times
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A lot of our neighbors own 'camps' that they visit during the summer; they live in either Portland Me, NH, or Mass.

It seems that with one foot here and one foot in each of those locations; the tax scene is a big deal to them.

My vehicles cost me $5 to $15 per year to register. Our property taxes are under $50 per year.

Apparently things are more expensive down there.
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Old 06-28-2008, 05:35 AM
 
Location: Mountains of NH!
311 posts, read 876,649 times
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But, aren't fuel costs and property taxes somewhat relative when you're weighing them against other quality of living issues? And they're not (yet anyway) forcing New Hampshirites to abject poverty. My husband and I are ordinary middle-middle-class folks. We own our own 2,000+ sq. ft. Cape-style home in the burbs of a resort community. All four of us have cars (kind of a necessity when you live in a rural community), one kid in college and another going to a private high school. Life isn't easy-street, but we're not surfing the net trying to find a cheaper state to live in. It's the quality of life in NH that makes it worthwhile for us to live here!

Why do national publications and organizations continue to rate New Hampshire so highly in so many categories compared to other states?

CQ Press rates New Hampshire as the safest state to live in, (up from fourth), the second healthiest state (up from fifth), and the most livable state (for the fifth straight year) in 2008!
The Commonwealth Fund's new State Scorecard ranks New Hampshire 3rd for health care quality! (2007)
New Hampshire rated 7th best in the Tax Foundation's 2007 State Business Tax Climate Index.
The Cato Institute notes that New Hampshire has the 4th lowest-size state/local bureaucracy (pdf, 2006)
The Beacon Hill Institute found New Hampshire third in economic competitiveness in 2006 (read the Full report (pdf).
Third-healthiest state (broken link) in the United Health Foundation's 2006 America's Health Rankings.
Best State for Well-Being of Children
#2 in 2005 Work Environment Index
According to Morgan Quinto, in 2005 New Hampshire was the 2nd Healthiest State, the Most Improved State, the 4th Safest State, and the overall Most Livable State!
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Old 06-30-2008, 02:51 PM
 
1,492 posts, read 6,965,370 times
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New Hampshire? Hmmm..... oil heat for a 2 bedroom house was $400 monthly. That was when fuel was $165 a gallon.

Hate to even think what it is now.

You will heat from October thru May....maybe June.

I don't recommend NH at all for retirees just for the heating costs alone.
Plus the miles in between cities and to Dartmouth for healthcare...the gas costs will kill anyone.
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Old 06-30-2008, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,718 posts, read 49,511,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VegasGrace View Post
New Hampshire? Hmmm..... oil heat for a 2 bedroom house was $400 monthly. That was when fuel was $165 a gallon.

Hate to even think what it is now.

You will heat from October thru May....maybe June.
I agree, I don't think that I would ever retire anywhere with such high winter heating bills.

If our monthly heating bill goes over $100, we would seriously be thinking of packing up and leaving here, that is for sure.
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Old 06-30-2008, 03:51 PM
 
1,492 posts, read 6,965,370 times
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New Hamshire is beautiful, lived there a few years. The heating oil bill was the factor that forced me to move.

There are some places that have brand new energy efficient homes. Those may not cost that much to heat. But I lived in a typical old house with a stone foundation basement, oil heat, clapboards...you've seen 'em.

Was a beauty! But killed my wallet!
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