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Old 12-29-2007, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Utopia
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Yes, property tax is so high as in Houston (which is like $19 per $1,000), but they don't tax income except for 5% on earnings from stocks, bonds and so forth. The only other negative I can find is some ridiculous car registration which costs $500-600 a year, I understand.
Does anyone know of any other hidden costs in NH that I am missing?
Also, why are more retirees not moving there? Is it the cold? Is it the tax situation?
Anyone who can shed any negative light on NH will help. I don't want any ugly surprises if I move there, and need to be forewarned.
As for me, the area sounds wonderful except for the lack of big cities...but then you have Boston an hour away from the Seacoast area of NH.
Any ideas on a senior with limited spending power moving to the Seacoast area (Exeter, Dover, Portsmouth) of New Hampshire?
Any why aren't more on this board interested in New Hampshire??????:conf used:
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Old 12-29-2007, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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The weather. Winters in many parts of NH can be brutal if you aren't interested in winter sports.
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Old 12-29-2007, 09:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maf763 View Post
The weather. Winters in many parts of NH can be brutal if you aren't interested in winter sports.
Amen! I'm heading to warmer climates, had enough of the frigid winters!!
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Old 12-29-2007, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Utopia
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Yeah, that's what I suspected. Even tho they have a good no tax situation there, people with arthritis and other joint problems will avoid NH like the plague I suspect.
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Old 12-29-2007, 04:22 PM
 
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The seacoast area is pretty expensive. And virtually everywhere in NH is car-dependent (looking down the road towards older age).
The property tax issue is major in NH. I live in Mass., and find the property taxes I hear about in NH to be shocking.
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Old 12-29-2007, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Utopia
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Property tax is about the same cost as in any major metro of Texas, by the way. Guess why I am not so shocked as others as I spent 22 long years in Houston with $19 per $1K as the property tax rate. Others, who come from lower areas insofar as property tax rates, are probably in total disbelief at such a high rate, tho.
The seacoast area is pretty expensive? I assume you are talking about the cost of housing only? Yes, you can get cheaper housing in Texas, for instance, but in Chicagoland you cannot. So, NH is pretty equal to the Chicagoland area.
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Old 12-30-2007, 03:18 PM
 
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Yes, cost of housing. It's a very popular area, especially if people feel they can commute to decent jobs, usually in Boston area.
The property taxes are very uneven from town to town. There was some sort of major overhaul of "giving" towns and "receiving" towns, based on income, skewed by part-time residents or something. So some towns are higher than one might expect, and some are lower.
If winter is OK with the OP, I think coastal NH would be a fine place to retire. If it's snowing, you just stay home for a day or so unti roads are cleared. Winter isn't one of my big issues, but if it were, I wouldn't stay in New England. (But ah, when humidity is your issue...)
Prices for many things are overall higher in New England, I'm told (by people from elsewhere). And the further north you go, the further you are from supply routes, and the fuel costs for delivering goods is pretty high. I lived in southern Maine for a year, and saw that living in a low-wage area didn't mean that goods were cheaper, although services might be (if available).
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Old 12-31-2007, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Utopia
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The biggest surprise to me is that property tax, services, costs, etc. vary from town to town and not by county as in other States. New Hampshire is a State that you better get involved in city government if you want to keep tax rates down. That State system is really unique.
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Old 12-31-2007, 07:23 AM
 
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"Unique" is one word for it.
There are sort of separate New Hampshires, too. A lot of southern NH feels like, has become like a Mass. suburb. The western area, Peterborough/Hillsborough County, is considered at least as liberal as Boston. There's some sort of division of north and south (probably where it becomes too far to commute to high-paying Mass. jobs) and it becomes small-town, rural, and some down-and-out areas. I think the coastal area would be a mix of Boston refugees and some higher-end workers. Witness the gentrification of Portsmouth. I remember in 1981, I drove to Portsmouth to get a tattoo, as they weren't legal in Mass. I went to a joint called "Skin Art," run by a biker artist guy, next to the bus station, right downtown. If they're all still there, they're next to the 2007 version of lofts and condos and fern bars.
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Old 12-31-2007, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Southeastern North Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TootsieWootsie View Post
The biggest surprise to me is that property tax, services, costs, etc. vary from town to town and not by county as in other States. New Hampshire is a State that you better get involved in city government if you want to keep tax rates down. That State system is really unique.
If you're from Texas, you'd be mighty surprised by the climate if you were to move to NH. It's not unusual to have snow still on the ground in mid-April. If you think of winter as being December, January, and February, you'd have to adjust your thinking and start considering it to be November through April. You may think that you like cold weather, but if you live way down south where you get very little of it, you'd better think again. New England winters (and springs) are painfully cold.

New England is beautiful, but the climate is difficult if you don't like the cold.
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