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Old 01-06-2008, 10:16 AM
 
528 posts, read 2,231,063 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
That's just a temporary problem. A lo-o-ng lasting one that will probably go for another 6 months or so. But all they need are a few good rain storms and the remnants of a big hurricane, and those happen all the time.
no, what they need is a better plan for managing long term growth against the available natural resources. It's surprising they didn't see as a potential problem sooner, and planned accordingly...
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Old 01-06-2008, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
369 posts, read 1,497,326 times
Reputation: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammie View Post
How well has the Gulf Coast recovered? Is everything cleaned up and rebuilt?
Hattiesburg was largely unaffected by the storm except for some downed trees and power outages. It's too far inland and is too far above sea level to be drastically affected by most hurricanes. In fact, most areas north of I-10 in Mississippi were spared from the amount of devestation seen further towards the coast.
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Old 01-06-2008, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,823,369 times
Reputation: 18992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toria View Post
no, what they need is a better plan for managing long term growth against the available natural resources. It's surprising they didn't see as a potential problem sooner, and planned accordingly...

LOL, you are absolutely right--better planning is definitely needed, too! In a way, I'm glad the drought hit now, when there is still time to build more reservoirs, and teach people better management. I hope people develop better habits. There are so many simple habits that can make a big diffrence (such as learning better ways to landscape your property).

But... I went through drought and water rationing in LA during the '90s. People changed their habits... for awhile...and then went back to old ways. Guess the same will happen in Atlanta. Once the rains start up again, people will forget. Sigh.
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Old 01-06-2008, 02:28 PM
 
528 posts, read 2,231,063 times
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you're quite right....we should all be trying to do our part instead of depending on the government to fix it so we can continue our wasteful ways. Makes sense no matter where one lives, but old habits die hard!
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Old 01-06-2008, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
5,661 posts, read 24,673,566 times
Reputation: 3808
Quote:
Originally Posted by janb View Post
Are there any areas east of CO, NM, WY, MT that have nice (60F) cool summer evenings to avail good sleep?

TN and NC are nice to visit in fall and spring, but not sure I could live there in the summer. (I don't have any $35.00 'grease' cars with AC..., but guess I could 'upgrade'...but prefer bicycling if possible) I just don't do heat and humidity well.
The mountain regions of North Carolina and Tennessee are quite comfortable in the dead of summer, unlike the rest of the two states. Most of NC & TN are too hot for me in the summer too.

Check the average highs & lows for July in those two regions such as Boone and Asheville, on the NC side.

Southeast Regional Climate Center - Historical Climate Data for the Southeast
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Old 01-09-2008, 09:36 PM
 
Location: IN
20,848 posts, read 35,948,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mm34b View Post
The mountain regions of North Carolina and Tennessee are quite comfortable in the dead of summer, unlike the rest of the two states. Most of NC & TN are too hot for me in the summer too.

Check the average highs & lows for July in those two regions such as Boone and Asheville, on the NC side.

Southeast Regional Climate Center - Historical Climate Data for the Southeast
Boone and Asheville NC have EXCELLENT summer weather. I visited that area one summer and really enjoyed many days with comfortable temperatures/humdity levels.
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Old 01-10-2008, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
55 posts, read 192,956 times
Reputation: 53
The MetLife Mature Market Study recently came out and said that only about 25% of baby boomers age 62 plan on moving in retirement. The vast majority want to stay in their current homes. An even smaller number (my guess 5%) intend to move out of state. So if you plan on moving to a new location - consider yourself an adventurer!

My observation is generally the same as what came out in a recent study of baby boomers in the NY Times , http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/06/we.../06duhigg.html ("Six Decades at the Center of Attention, and Still Counting") baby boomers represent a majority of 1 - everybody is different. So expect a lot of different answers. The consultants in the Times's study put boomers into different socio-economic groups. The people at the top of the pile have so much money they can go anywhere, and then there are the "Live for Today's" - they want to have fun but didnt save enough. They are going to have to be very creative about where they live to maintain their lifestyles - maybe Costa Rica or Mexico.

I just saw a little bit of the choices that are out there on a research drive for my website, www.topretirements.com. We went through southern Georgia, cutting across from Tallahassee to just south of Savannah. Thomasville (GA), which is pretty close to Tallahassee, has already been gentrified. Not much risk in moving there. But if you move back east you see towns that show signs of being nice and positive growth, like Valdosta, Quitman, and Boston. Then you go to Waycross - great infrastructure in the downtown, some development going on. But an old southern town that has clearly had some downs and not too many ups in the last 100 years. So there is some risk there, particularly if you are not already used to living in the south. Will the towns take off, or will you be a lonely pioneer? Depending on your fondness for risk, you could be the earlybird and discover a retirement town, or you might want to wait until somebody calls it a 10 best town and then make your move.
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Old 01-22-2008, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,170 posts, read 8,693,102 times
Reputation: 6167
Smile Where are the areas...?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TootsieWootsie View Post
I just read that by 2030 the most popular States for the over 65 crowd will be: 1. California (whew, with those high taxes?); 2. Texas and 3. Florida. Anyone else read this???
Send me what areas in California. In Florida, check out The Villages in central FL. Heard great things, plan to visit soon but told I was probably too young right now! (in 50's).

But it is nice to be called "too young"!!!
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Old 02-02-2008, 07:38 PM
 
75 posts, read 193,298 times
Reputation: 47
We bought a used RV to tour the country. Right now we are in Grove, Ok. at Cedar Oaks RV park. Beautiful place with the nicest people. There are about a dozen people here in the RV park on a permanent basis. From what I understand, many retirees sell out, buy an RV, stay where they want as long as they want. The rent in a RV park is really cheap compared to owning a home with all the upkeep that entails. A Friend moved to SW corner of OK a few years ago and loves it.
We plan on going to Brownsville, Texas to soak up some sun and beach. Best part is the adventure we've begun. Our home is in mid Illinois, now covered with 12 inches of snow. Don't know if we will permanently move anywhere, but as retirees sure have the freedom to pack up and go whenever the weather or people doesn't suit us.
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Old 02-04-2008, 02:37 PM
 
6,992 posts, read 6,987,396 times
Reputation: 5806
From Dahlonega you can go about 30 minutes south into Alpharetta, where at the Northpoint Mall area there are numerous stores and restaurants. Also, Roswell has a lot going on and is about the same distance from Dahlonega. Those mountains are gorgeous in the spring & fall. Be sure to travel the scenic highway near Helen, Ga, a little town that has been turned into an alpine village, complete with beautiful Anna Ruby Falls just north of it. The fall colors are magnificent.
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