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Thread summary:

Ideas for making transition to retirement; projects include making database of all items, researching volunteer activities, researching family history, downsizing home

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Old 01-03-2008, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,836,225 times
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Some people worry about making the transition into retirement. It's hard to learn how to relax, how to make new friends. Let's list some ideas.

Here's one: Take your digital camera, and take a photo of every single item you own. Start a database that includes useful info such as how much the item cost, what the replacement value might be, and how you came to acquire it. Maybe even who you would like to see own it someday.

This project will keep you very busy during those first few weeks when you don't know what to do with yourself. You will probably start going to the lirbary to research the history on some items, which will get you out fo the hous. Looking at the photos will bring back fond memories, and also remind you of some things that you've always wanted to do (when you had the time--which you now have!)
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Old 01-03-2008, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,836,225 times
Reputation: 18992
And this is from a thread below--it's what inspired the idea for this thread. It's an idea that worked for my friend:

The first thing she did when she retired was start to write a book about "how to retire." She wanted to record all the useful tips she had collected.

The first week or so, she worked at a gung-ho pace. In fact, she probably wrote half the book during that first week.

Then she realized she needed to go to the library to look up some statistics. And when she got to the library she realized she now had time to read some magazines she had never looked at before. On her way home, she stopped at the park and got some information about taking classes.

In the second week, she still worked on the book but she also began to find new ways to spend her time. When her friends asked her what she was doing with hre retirement, she told them about the book. This led into several interesting conversations with all sorts of people, and she began making new friends. The friends, in turn, invited her to lunch or to take walks, etc.

One time she needed to do some research at a local history museum. She saw a sign that they needed volunteer docents--and soon she was busy at the museum. The other volunteers were also retirees and she began doing activities with them, too.

After a few more weeks, she only worked on the book from time to time. It was the perfect project to get her through the transition. It got her out into the community (which is important--don't just stay inside watching the tv). Best of all it was an interesting project, and she was glad to give the information to other family members who could use it.
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Old 01-04-2008, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Lovelock, NV - Anchorage, AK
1,195 posts, read 4,995,597 times
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Default Preparing for retirement

Well we have 148 days left before we give notice of retirement. We will be relocating to a warmer climate for the winter months. I've started the down sizing with donating cloths, when I go shopping I think about moving it and in most cases will not purchase the item.

I've been fixing up the house making some minor repairs to prepare to market it. Not sure if I'm jumping the gun, I've packed up our artwork, china, and our gadgets. My husband reminds me that we still have 148 days and we still have to live in the house for that time.

Has anybody else been so excited about retiring and they too started the down sizing and if so was it too soon.
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Old 01-05-2008, 03:47 AM
 
Location: Ocean Shores, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tressa View Post
Has anybody else been so excited about retiring and they too started the down sizing and if so was it too soon.
My wife retires in six months, but the walls are already bare and the rooms are getting empty. We have already sold or given away three trucks full of stuff.

In a couple of weeks I'm making a trip to our new house with a load of stuff that my wife has been packing for the last few months.

I plan to make a couple of more trips so when the time finally comes, all we will have left to move is a few pieces of furniture, the kitchen stuff, the TV, our clothes, and our cats.

Our stove, refrigerator, washer and dryer, and spa will be among the last to be given away. The bed and mattress, sofa and a bunch of other stuff will end up in the dumpster that we plan to rent.
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Old 01-05-2008, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
1,479 posts, read 7,041,098 times
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I planned to retire early and wanted to make sure I had something meaningful to do as a replacement for the job I was leaving. I didn't want a full-time gig, but I knew I would need something to lend some weight and importance to my days. During the years before I retired I researched local volunteer opportunities. I finally identified a volunteer group that needed the kind of help I could provide. I began volunteering on a limited basis during the last year I worked to make sure the group and I were a good fit. When I retired I already had a "job" a few hours a week and a whole group of new friends. It worked out wonderfully, and I've never been so happy. My husband is still working and will retire next year, so he's now starting his research on what he wants to do when he retires.
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Old 01-05-2008, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Lovelock, NV - Anchorage, AK
1,195 posts, read 4,995,597 times
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My husband and I will be improving our 5 acres by building a house and landscaping, we already have a shop up with our toys in it and some other stuff but no home yet so I figure we will be busy for the first year or so.
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Old 01-05-2008, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
857 posts, read 4,475,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Freddy View Post
Our stove, refrigerator, washer and dryer, and spa will be among the last to be given away. The bed and mattress, sofa and a bunch of other stuff will end up in the dumpster that we plan to rent.
Here's a suggestion for when it's time to move... if you have any military bases near you many of them will take your donations.
I had to empty my son's apt. off-base several months ago and his Lt. told me about the "Airman's Attic". They took all of his furniture, kitchen stuff, appliances, etc. and they will give it to some Airman who is moving off base and doesn't have any furniture. I'm betting that all branches of the service have something similar and, Lord knows, these guys don't make a lot of money so they can use the help.
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Old 01-05-2008, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Ocean Shores, WA
5,081 posts, read 12,981,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthmeetsSouth View Post
Here's a suggestion for when it's time to move... if you have any military bases near you many of them will take your donations.
We used to have two Air Force bases and an Army base here, but they all have been de-activated. Many years ago I was stationed at one of them as a married low grade Airman and we would have really appreciated those programs you mentioned.

I don't like to give it to those "Thrift Store" organizations who re-sell it. I'm sure some of them do good things with the money, but that doesn't help the people who really need the stuff.

I just post the stuff I have on the Freecycle list, or the free section of Craig's List. I always get lots of response and the folks who come to get the items seem really appreciative. I don't even mind if they take it and resell it. I'm sure they need the money more than I do.
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Old 01-06-2008, 08:32 AM
 
Location: DC Area, for now
3,517 posts, read 12,057,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tressa View Post
Has anybody else been so excited about retiring and they too started the down sizing and if so was it too soon.
I've got two years to go and I'm already starting to change the way I look at my stuff. I look around and see decades of accumulated stuff, a good deal of which I haven't used in more than 20 years. I'm starting periodically to do clean outs and stopping buying more stuff, unless it's a tool I need. It is really such a big job, that realistically, I know it will take a long time to rid myself of all that stuff I no longer need or want. I'm trying to apply the rule of not used or not loved, then out it goes.

I'm spending most of my free time on the house projects to get it refreshed for an eventual sale. After looking into what it will take to move, I'm also making lists of what I really can't part with (my antique bed) and all that stuff that I should give away right before I move because it isn't worth the high cost of moving it.

It's a huge job to clean out and remake yourself.
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Old 01-06-2008, 08:56 AM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,312 posts, read 15,368,793 times
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We built a house, or did the finishing anyway (not the framing or the roofing or putting up drywall). We put in the floors, tile, cabinets, counters, decking, did the painting.

I'm not sure I recommend it as a theory of how to keep yourself busy as a retiree, as it was a bit stressful and probably way too much physical work. Plus two people, living in 800 sf of mostly finished house (and another 1,200 sf of unfinished), with one car, 25 miles from town, was a little TOO much togetherness.

But retirement took us by surprise - I work as a freelance editor and writer, so I haven't had a "real" job for a few years, but the spouse was an engineer at a Fortune 50 company who offered early retirement. We crunched numbers and had financial discussions with several organizations/individuals and finally jumped. From the offer to the actual retirement was something like 4 months.

Maybe NOT having the time to stress out about it was good. So now we're a 54 yr old and a 48 yr old retired couple - can I just say how lovely it is to wake up naturally instead of waking up to an alarm clock? We get up around 7 or 7:30 anyway, but the spouse worked the standard high-tech 10 hour day, 5 days a week and I think he's catching up on about 25 years of missed sleep.
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