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Old 12-27-2014, 04:12 PM
 
Location: NC
6,572 posts, read 8,005,004 times
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This article recently appeared http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/27/yo...nded.html?_r=0 presenting the idea of boutique style retirement communities based on certain characteristics or histories of their clients. What do you think? Are they sustainable? Financially reliable?

One question I have is what happens to the huge up front fees that are paid. Where do they go and who babysits them? They do sound rather enticing if you could find one with your sort of like-minded elders. Big money, though.
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Old 12-27-2014, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,756,785 times
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The concept reminds me of a poster in this Retirement Forum whom I haven't noticed here in a while. He was interested in organizing and starting his own retirement community for former rock and roll musicians and singers. The idea was they could get together and jam since they would all be living in close proximity. His user name might have been "Rock till you drop" or something like that. (Can't remember exactly).

I have lots of interests, some of which are actually former interests, so I'm not sure which affinity group I would gravitate to if I were interested in living in an age-graded community. However, the whole idea of being with like-minded elders is rather fascinating and it got me thinking. (How unusual!)

I think I would choose to be among people who have a love for classical music. It's not so much that the music we love would be similar, but that classical music lovers tend to be educated, well-traveled, and cosmopolitan. (Yes, that comes across as snobbish, but please notice the "tend to be".) Therefore, my hope (under those circumstances) would be to avoid people whose only topics of conversation are the weather, their ailments, and a simplistic brand of politics.
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Old 12-27-2014, 07:37 PM
 
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I am just not into one single thing to even consider that. I'd like place if I ever go that has more than one theme or I'd get bored like being on a cruise ship for more than three days.I am not a person to want to drown in anything the rest of my life.
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Old 12-27-2014, 07:43 PM
 
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I love classical music, Escort Rider, but I'm not sure that would be me the niche I would go for since I also love jazz and rock....and I learned the hard way with my father-in-law (also a classical music lover) that just this mutual interest doesn't make for a good relationship. He was not a nice person in many ways.

One of my most important interests/lifestyle preferences is eating a whole foods plant-based diet. There are very few retirement communities that could cater to this diet. Seventh Day Adventist communities/facilities would be an option....but I'm definitely not a SDA! There are a few Indian facilities that offer vegetarian diets, but I'm not Indian.

For a niche retirement community, I would probably do best in one that caters to Buddhist liberal vegans who like to do yoga and tai chi, as well as other forms of exercise and who enjoy foreign and independent films, jazz/classical/rock music, and reading. Somehow I don't think one is going to materialize anytime soon---so I think it's best for me to try to stay in place as long as possible. Contrary to the song "Somewhere" in West Side Story, I am not sure that "somewhere there is a place for us"...or more specifically, me.

And then there is the issue of how well I would even do in a community. I am a gregarious introvert, so while I long to connect with others in a meaningful way, I also quickly get my energy depleted by too much social interaction.
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Old 12-27-2014, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,756,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzcat22 View Post
I love classical music, Escort Rider, but I'm not sure that would be me the niche I would go for since I also love jazz and rock....and I learned the hard way with my father-in-law (also a classical music lover) that just this mutual interest doesn't make for a good relationship. He was not a nice person in many ways.

One of my most important interests/lifestyle preferences is eating a whole foods plant-based diet. There are very few retirement communities that could cater to this diet. Seventh Day Adventist communities/facilities would be an option....but I'm definitely not a SDA! There are a few Indian facilities that offer vegetarian diets, but I'm not Indian.

For a niche retirement community, I would probably do best in one that caters to Buddhist liberal vegans who like to do yoga and tai chi, as well as other forms of exercise and who enjoy foreign and independent films, jazz/classical/rock music, and reading. Somehow I don't think one is going to materialize anytime soon---so I think it's best for me to try to stay in place as long as possible. Contrary to the song "Somewhere" in West Side Story, I am not sure that "somewhere there is a place for us"...or more specifically, me.

And then there is the issue of how well I would even do in a community. I am a gregarious introvert, so while I long to connect with others in a meaningful way, I also quickly get my energy depleted by too much social interaction.
I agree that mutual interest in classical music does not guarantee being compatible with any given individual. I was simply casting around for a niche community that I would possibly choose if it existed and if I wanted to live in a community. And yes, Buddhist liberal vegans may not exactly be out there in large numbers of communities either!

I'm glad you paired "gregarious" with "introvert" because so many people misunderstand what it means to be an introvert, thinking introverts are loners who do not like other people and who do not have friends. Not true (as you know - I am really writing this for others who may come along and read it). Introverts prefer socializing with one or two or three people at a time rather than large crowds and they value their time alone. And they are not necessarily shy either.
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Old 12-28-2014, 02:15 AM
 
Location: Bay Area, California
118 posts, read 128,175 times
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I think I would choose to be among people who have a love for classical music. It's not so much that the music we love would be similar, but that classical music lovers tend to be educated, well-traveled, and cosmopolitan. (Yes, that comes across as snobbish, but please notice the "tend to be".) Therefore, my hope (under those circumstances) would be to avoid people whose only topics of conversation are the weather, their ailments, and a simplistic brand of politics.[/quote]


I'm thinking along the same lines as Escort Rider here and again emphasizing the "tend to be" part of the statement. I really would love to travel, go to symphonies, take university classes and maybe learn a new language with my friends and neighbors. Going to fashion shows and discussing the woes of our children (and my own) is not how I want to spend these precious years left.

I'd love a "boutique community" but after the up front cost, who could afford the symphony ticket?
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Old 12-28-2014, 03:37 AM
 
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After watching my motherinlaw at her senior complex, the most important part is having enough people around to find a few that can become friends.

Also a community that "cares" about the residents happiness and not just health or money.
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Old 12-28-2014, 04:07 AM
 
10,392 posts, read 9,397,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
This article recently appeared http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/27/yo...nded.html?_r=0 presenting the idea of boutique style retirement communities based on certain characteristics or histories of their clients. What do you think? Are they sustainable? Financially reliable?

One question I have is what happens to the huge up front fees that are paid. Where do they go and who babysits them? They do sound rather enticing if you could find one with your sort of like-minded elders. Big money, though.
Interesting question about the 6 figures paid upfront required to move in, and then the high monthly rent on top of that. Yesterday I talked with a lady who managers a senior complex and we discussed communities that require the buy-in fee. She informed me to be very, very careful about those communities because the majority are the same as a time-share and the only way you'd ever get your money returned (without interest of course), or for your survivors to get a refund, is when a new resident purchases your 'share'.

Plus, she said there was a buy-in complex in her town but it went bankrupt and everyone lost their buy-in money.
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Old 12-28-2014, 06:03 AM
 
2,694 posts, read 2,209,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzcat22 View Post
I love classical music, Escort Rider, but I'm not sure that would be me the niche I would go for since I also love jazz and rock....and I learned the hard way with my father-in-law (also a classical music lover) that just this mutual interest doesn't make for a good relationship. He was not a nice person in many ways.

One of my most important interests/lifestyle preferences is eating a whole foods plant-based diet. There are very few retirement communities that could cater to this diet. Seventh Day Adventist communities/facilities would be an option....but I'm definitely not a SDA! There are a few Indian facilities that offer vegetarian diets, but I'm not Indian.

For a niche retirement community, I would probably do best in one that caters to Buddhist liberal vegans who like to do yoga and tai chi, as well as other forms of exercise and who enjoy foreign and independent films, jazz/classical/rock music, and reading. Somehow I don't think one is going to materialize anytime soon---so I think it's best for me to try to stay in place as long as possible. Contrary to the song "Somewhere" in West Side Story, I am not sure that "somewhere there is a place for us"...or more specifically, me.

And then there is the issue of how well I would even do in a community. I am a gregarious introvert, so while I long to connect with others in a meaningful way, I also quickly get my energy depleted by too much social interaction.
When and where do we start? I thought there were some people in Oregon trying to do this. Can't remember where I saw the info.

It would be so nice to eat without having to answer 20 questions, or have to leave a room or store because the smell of roasting chickens or bbq pork make me want to puke.

The small town I fell in love with has a bbq place on every corner. Yikes!

And being a gregarious introvert can be rough.
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Old 12-28-2014, 07:41 AM
 
2,742 posts, read 729,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ByeByeLW View Post
When and where do we start? I thought there were some people in Oregon trying to do this. Can't remember where I saw the info.

It would be so nice to eat without having to answer 20 questions, or have to leave a room or store because the smell of roasting chickens or bbq pork make me want to puke.

The small town I fell in love with has a bbq place on every corner. Yikes!

And being a gregarious introvert can be rough.
Wouldn't it be fantastic to start something like this? But the problem is the niche element. There are so few of us. And then when you get into the different factions of vegans: no oil, fruitarians, raw, etc., it would be impossible to please/cater to all. Or maybe not. If a community wasn't run for profit, perhaps it could be done.

Supposedly retirement communities nowadays are different than they were years ago. I guess that's true. But for those who are genuinely quirky (at 60, I am determined to embrace this aspect of myself!) and have interests/preferences/needs that are not mainstream, I do feel most retirement places would feel to me like I was living back in the 50's! And I'd starve to death!
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