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Old 01-07-2015, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,784 posts, read 23,827,553 times
Reputation: 6195

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Yes, very interesting, Loveautumn; thank you for posting that. However, I disagree about "no surprises". First, I had to remind myself that if one in four movers are doing so because of retirement, that means three out of four are doing so for other reasons, which I presume would be mostly job-related. So that explains Washington D.C. as a popular destination; it would not be popular with retirees because of the cost of living but would be popular for careers.

To me, the surprises were Idaho and Vermont, hardly meccas for jobs, but also with the cold winters that retirees presumably avoid. What makes them popular?

I would love to see California among the states people are moving out of because we have way too many people here, but no such luck. I would gladly pay twice the taxes if we could have half the people while retaining the same infrastructure but I realize that's just a fantasy, a dream.
I think California has a bit of movement within the state for retirement. After all it is possible to move to much lower cost areas yet still stay in the state itself. If someone is going to have a lower retirement income generally based on Social Security, they won't have much of an income tax bill here either.

Regarding it being crowded, if you draw a horizontal line through in the state through Yuba City, you'd have an area north of it about the size of Ohio. Yet, it barely has a million folks in that entire region, so there is plenty of room to stretch out here. In addition a lot of cities like Merced, Ukiah, Lodi or Turlock offer a relatively modest cost of living and a relaxed atmosphere associated with town life. So there are a lot of retirement options within California, yet making the big metro areas still pretty close by when or if desired.
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Old 01-07-2015, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,765,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewToCA View Post
I think California has a bit of movement within the state for retirement. After all it is possible to move to much lower cost areas yet still stay in the state itself. If someone is going to have a lower retirement income generally based on Social Security, they won't have much of an income tax bill here either.

Regarding it being crowded, if you draw a horizontal line through in the state through Yuba City, you'd have an area north of it about the size of Ohio. Yet, it barely has a million folks in that entire region, so there is plenty of room to stretch out here. In addition a lot of cities like Merced, Ukiah, Lodi or Turlock offer a relatively modest cost of living and a relaxed atmosphere associated with town life. So there are a lot of retirement options within California, yet making the big metro areas still pretty close by when or if desired.
Yes, that is an excellent point and quite accurate. Even though I have traveled within California a fair amount, I still fall into the mental trap of thinking that California is Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Francisco. That's probably because I live in the greater Los Angeles area myself. Indeed, when people talk about the high cost of living in this state, they are mostly thinking about the three major cities, as that's where most of the population is.

Also good point about the state income tax. I have emphasized in previous posts that the state income tax structure is very progressive. So while the top rate is indeed horrendous (highest in the nation if I recall correctly), that top rate applies to the portion of one's income exceeding one million dollars. At more modest levels of income, the Calif. income tax is similar to the bite of most other states with income taxes.
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Old 01-08-2015, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Connecticut is my adopted home.
2,277 posts, read 3,084,718 times
Reputation: 7018
I moved back to Kansas but I get why people leave. Extreme weather, every insect, rodent, creepy crawlies and pest known on the continent proliferate here, droughts, mostly uninspiring landscapes (unless one admires the subtle oceanic beauty of the gently rolling land covered with waving grasses as I do) friendly but insular people, the stupid politics, the dying farm towns that can't be revived, and I'm sorry but people are going to get ruffled with this, the backwardness of a fair number of people I've met or observed regarding the treatment of animals and persons not of their race.

I chose the one of maybe a few places in Kansas that I could feel relatively at home living in this state. I'm here because family is aging but we may yet be leaving after family affairs are settled.
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Old 01-08-2015, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,651 posts, read 17,632,423 times
Reputation: 27759
For what it's worth, I've never had a positive experience in any Ohio city from the admittedly limited time I've spent there. West Virginia is a challenge all to its own. If I never see either of those states again, I would not be upset.
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Old 01-09-2015, 10:19 AM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,325 posts, read 15,377,978 times
Reputation: 9537
The list is by percentage of people moving in versus moving out, not by raw numbers, so it has nothing to do with "top destinations."

One of the reasons that Oregon has such high unemployment and comparatively low pay is that people move here and don't want to leave, so they accept less, in terms of unemployment and pay.

As for taxes - yes, we have a high income tax that is not particularly progressive, no sales tax, a property tax that is pretty much "mid-pack." Social security is not taxed (more or less) but pensions and other retirement distributions are. Taxes, while important, were not the #1 priority on my retirement list - staying the west was, so I stayed in Oregon after looking at New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Nevada, California.
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Old 01-09-2015, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,663 posts, read 1,530,975 times
Reputation: 3650
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
The list is by percentage of people moving in versus moving out, not by raw numbers, so it has nothing to do with "top destinations."

One of the reasons that Oregon has such high unemployment and comparatively low pay is that people move here and don't want to leave, so they accept less, in terms of unemployment and pay.

As for taxes - yes, we have a high income tax that is not particularly progressive, no sales tax, a property tax that is pretty much "mid-pack." Social security is not taxed (more or less) but pensions and other retirement distributions are. Taxes, while important, were not the #1 priority on my retirement list - staying the west was, so I stayed in Oregon after looking at New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Nevada, California.
Oregon also allows deductions of up to approximately $6K of federal income tax paid and deduction of
federal pension income for work years prior to October 1, 1991. By the time I deduct all of this and social security from my taxable income, the taxes will not be that much different from what I would pay in my current state. So I am doing my research prior to relocating and I don't feel that I will be "raped" by the State of Oregon. If I were still working and not retired, it might be a different story. My biggest concern is the increasing home prices in Oregon although those increases seem to be tapering off some.
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Old 01-09-2015, 02:21 PM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,325 posts, read 15,377,978 times
Reputation: 9537
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ2015 View Post
Oregon also allows deductions of up to approximately $6K of federal income tax paid and deduction of
federal pension income for work years prior to October 1, 1991. By the time I deduct all of this and social security from my taxable income, the taxes will not be that much different from what I would pay in my current state. So I am doing my research prior to relocating and I don't feel that I will be "raped" by the State of Oregon. If I were still working and not retired, it might be a different story. My biggest concern is the increasing home prices in Oregon although those increases seem to be tapering off some.
I would expect prices to keep rising because of the very low vacancy rates. This tends to translate to higher prices at the lower end of the market. When I first started looking in the Medford area in 2013, you could find reasonable fixer-uppers (ie: not taking the house all the way to the studs and rebuilding) in some of the better neighborhoods for $125-$150k. Now the same houses are above $200k because the low end of the market is in high demand as both starter houses and income property (a LOT of cash sales in the last year plus). Houses in, say, the $600,000 range are selling slightly faster than they were a couple of years ago, but not by much as the high end just doesn't move.

On the other hand, I saw an article in the paper today talking about how the real estate market here is "back to normal" - ie the houses are priced back at peak bubble amounts and there are several new developments (both houses and apartments) going in, something that virtually stopped in about 2007. So we are back to bubble conditions again, I guess - how this is a GOOD thing escapes me. And this is in an area with about a 7% unemployment rate (down from 14% at peak recession, 4.7% at the peak bubble).
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Old 01-10-2015, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,004,474 times
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CNN Money reports this week ("Everyone is Moving to Oregon") that more people are moving to Oregon than any other state.
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Old 01-10-2015, 08:21 AM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,196 posts, read 2,866,336 times
Reputation: 4902
We looked at Oregon. Drove from Salt Lake to Bend, OR as my spouse was interested in seeing that community. Could not believe how desolate eastern Oregon looked.

The recession was in high gear in Bend. Unemployment was something like 16%. Lots of businesses were shuttered. It was a really creepy feeling. Then you go to the ski resorts there and the rich pander about like nothing is wrong.

I nixed Bend for the simple reason that it's out in the middle of NOWHERE. Yes, it is beautiful..... but I need connections to real civilization that I can get to in short order.

We then drove to the coast - Newport and down to Florence. Beautiful.... but the plethora of FOR SALE signs on coastal properties was unnerving. Probably the result of the recession? I don't know.

I just do not want to live in a fog belt. Or feel like my feet are becoming webbed with all the rain.

Nice place to visit - but nope on moving there. We didn't even go to Portland - because we know it is so very over-hyped.
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Old 01-10-2015, 09:10 AM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,325 posts, read 15,377,978 times
Reputation: 9537
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
CNN Money reports this week ("Everyone is Moving to Oregon") that more people are moving to Oregon than any other state.
It is amazing how a PR story from United Moving gets picked up as "fact" by lazy new organizations. It flat-out isn't true that "more people" are moving to Oregon than any other state - it is ONLY that Oregon has the highest ratio of people moving in versus moving out. I am sure that California and Texas have far more people moving in.

It wasn't just CNN, either, I've seen this in other major news outlets.
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