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Old 01-04-2015, 04:28 PM
 
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Here's a list from Movers (Allied/United Van Lines) showing the top places people are moving to and from. One in four people moving out of an area indicate retirement as the reason.

Top places folks are moving to:

Oregon
South Carolina
North Carolina
Vermont
Florida
Nevada
Texas
Washington DC
Oklahoma
Idaho

Top places folks are moving out of:

New Jersey
New York
Illinois
West Virginia
Ohio
Kansas
New Mexico
Pennsylvania
Connecticut

Balanced states (balanced number of people moving in and out)

Rhode Island
New Hampshire
Wyoming
Tennessee

No real big surprises here but I thought it was interesting to get information from companies that actually move people.
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Old 01-04-2015, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,668 posts, read 17,640,506 times
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Many of the states people are moving out of are high-tax, liberal states. Still, I don't attribute this as much to their liberalism as I do toward an aging population moving somewhere warmer. For careers, do you go to NY/NJ/CT or SC? I love SC, but it's economy is lousy compared to the big states.
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Old 01-04-2015, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,765,919 times
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Yes, very interesting, Loveautumn; thank you for posting that. However, I disagree about "no surprises". First, I had to remind myself that if one in four movers are doing so because of retirement, that means three out of four are doing so for other reasons, which I presume would be mostly job-related. So that explains Washington D.C. as a popular destination; it would not be popular with retirees because of the cost of living but would be popular for careers.

To me, the surprises were Idaho and Vermont, hardly meccas for jobs, but also with the cold winters that retirees presumably avoid. What makes them popular?

I would love to see California among the states people are moving out of because we have way too many people here, but no such luck. I would gladly pay twice the taxes if we could have half the people while retaining the same infrastructure but I realize that's just a fantasy, a dream.
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Old 01-04-2015, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,004,474 times
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I don't yet get the upshot of this information for retirees....
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Old 01-04-2015, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
21,539 posts, read 14,425,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Yes, very interesting, Loveautumn; thank you for posting that. However, I disagree about "no surprises". First, I had to remind myself that if one in four movers are doing so because of retirement, that means three out of four are doing so for other reasons, which I presume would be mostly job-related. So that explains Washington D.C. as a popular destination; it would not be popular with retirees because of the cost of living but would be popular for careers.

To me, the surprises were Idaho and Vermont, hardly meccas for jobs, but also with the cold winters that retirees presumably avoid. What makes them popular?

I would love to see California among the states people are moving out of because we have way too many people here, but no such luck. I would gladly pay twice the taxes if we could have half the people while retaining the same infrastructure but I realize that's just a fantasy, a dream.
You answered your own question, Escort.
Folks are moving to Idaho to escape so much humanity. We are getting a lot of Californians who think it's now too crowded there.
Other reasons are low crime communities and low housing and cost of living expenses.

You are not exactly correct about lack of jobs in Idaho. There are jobs, but most don't pay well. The south end of the state is doing better economically, but the folks moving here are mostly moving to the panhandle, where the scenery is beautiful. Boise is getting a lot because it's the only large city in Idaho, and where there are more better paying jobs. Not all who move here want to live in the boonies, and Boise is in the warmest area of the state as well.

Some retirees who move here say they want a 4 season state, and some say summers are too hot and too long in other states and they would rather put up with winter than summer.

Others move here because it's a very conservative state.
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Old 01-04-2015, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,598,790 times
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Lots of families moved to Texas over the past few years because of the COL.
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Old 01-05-2015, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,668 posts, read 17,640,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Yes, very interesting, Loveautumn; thank you for posting that. However, I disagree about "no surprises". First, I had to remind myself that if one in four movers are doing so because of retirement, that means three out of four are doing so for other reasons, which I presume would be mostly job-related. So that explains Washington D.C. as a popular destination; it would not be popular with retirees because of the cost of living but would be popular for careers.

To me, the surprises were Idaho and Vermont, hardly meccas for jobs, but also with the cold winters that retirees presumably avoid. What makes them popular?

I would love to see California among the states people are moving out of because we have way too many people here, but no such luck. I would gladly pay twice the taxes if we could have half the people while retaining the same infrastructure but I realize that's just a fantasy, a dream.
I know a few people (mostly in their 20s-30s now) from back home in TN who moved to the Mountain West largely because they are avid outdoorsmen. They may be leaving some career progression or money on the table, but for them the outdoors is worth it. I'm sure a lot of active retirees who are into the outdoors love those states.
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Old 01-05-2015, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,709 posts, read 33,734,897 times
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What surprises me is no Maryland or Virginia. The Washington DC area has always been very transient. I'm pretty sure back in the 1970s the average person stayed in the DC area for 3 years. Federal workers tended to move there toward the end of their careers for the higher paying jobs and then left as soon as they retired. I'm thinking maybe the rest of those states are now balancing out that trend or the profile of the typical Headquarters federal employee has changed.
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Old 01-05-2015, 12:15 PM
 
29,824 posts, read 34,912,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
What surprises me is no Maryland or Virginia. The Washington DC area has always been very transient. I'm pretty sure back in the 1970s the average person stayed in the DC area for 3 years. Federal workers tended to move there toward the end of their careers for the higher paying jobs and then left as soon as they retired. I'm thinking maybe the rest of those states are now balancing out that trend or the profile of the typical Headquarters federal employee has changed.
What is happening in Maryland is that more affluent and older residents are moving out and less affluent first and second generation immigrants are moving in creating revenue/expenditure inbalances. It is a topic of discussion. Yes taxation has been a factor.
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Old 01-05-2015, 12:22 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,195 posts, read 2,866,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post

To me, the surprises were Idaho and Vermont, hardly meccas for jobs, but also with the cold winters that retirees presumably avoid. What makes them popular?
Boise - yes, there are jobs and California companies are relocating. HP is there as are others...

And the outdoors.

But it is getting crowded there....
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