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Old 01-12-2015, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,950 posts, read 5,305,279 times
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I fit the eat early stereotype. I always ate early. It isn't because I'm getting old.



I notice 2 main types of seniors. The ones that talk about what they have done and still refer to themselves by their former occupation. Then there are the ones that talk about what they are doing now and are still wanting to learn new things. I try to avoid the first group and thankfully all of my friends are in the second.
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Old 01-12-2015, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Paradise CA, that place on fire
750 posts, read 438,364 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 68551 View Post
One thing I did notice as a Realtor before I retired is that many old peoples homes smelled the same....Not sure why that is but we sure hope to avoid it in our house.
I agree with you completely, we have exactly the same problem. As we get older and our eyesight is failing it becomes much harder to locate the spot: "Honey, do you have an idea where did the dogs pee today? Last week it was the fireplace...."
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Old 01-12-2015, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,554,924 times
Reputation: 29033
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
I know several older people -- about half of whom are persnickety busybodies, bitter and always on the lookout for something ANYTHING to complain about, and everything is just awful all the time, while they are keeping busy (although in my opinion not busy enough). The rest keep busy and keep active.

So the "get off my lawn" contingent in the geezer world is alive and well, but it certainly isn't all of them.

But it bothers me, as I am toe dipping range of geezerhood at 55, that the women I see who are bitter and unpleasant are childless and alone. While I'm not alone, we are childless by choice and I'm wondering if not raising children and having to give of myself is what makes them just awful.... I don't want to be a miserable cuss in my old age -- life is too sweet for that, and sometimes I am little worried about that....
I am childless by choice and I have never had any reason to second guess that decision. I've lived the life I wanted to live having far more choices than many other people have. I'm not living alone for the first time in decades because I now have my disabled elderly mother living with me. Not my idea of how I would spend the first decade of semi-retirement from employment, but she needed help and I stepped up.

Perhaps I seem unpleasant to some, but I prefer to talk about books, travel, art, politics, sports, music, etc., than other people's personal business. I barely know my neighbors, so I'm sure not butting into their affairs. I have a couple of serious health issues, but even some of my family members don't know about them. My best friends are a writer, a university professor, a Realtor, and an art dealer (two of whom also have sole responsibility for a sick parent). All of us certainly do complain, but there is plenty in this world to be legitimately angry about. There are also plenty of great things to do and we try to do them when we are not meeting our responsibilities.

Now that I am too old to have children, I see myself surrounded by peers who are subsumed by the problems of their adult children and don't really understand the lives of their grandchildren. How many grandmas are raising their grandchildren whether or not that was their idea of how to spend their retirement? How many seniors are still dishing out the cash to help their kids when they might be dedicating it to their own needs as elders? If those actions are their choice, that's fine and in any case, it's not my place to criticize how people raise their children or interact with them once they leave the nest. But I suspect some are doing it out of fear that they will be abandoned by their offspring if they aren't a constant source of assistance. You and I aren't going to have to worry about that. We are used to taking care of ourselves.

Often elderly people complain because they do, indeed, have unpleasant lives. Many have lost their life partners and most of their friends. They are in physical pain, they often have limited finances, the world has no respect for their opinions, they don't understand a lot of what is going on around them because of diminishing cognitive skills and/or information overload. They are scared they will lose the Social Security that's keeping them alive, because, to be fair, that IS always being threatened by conservative politicians who see Social Security and Medicare as "entitlements" these people don't deserve. Their doctors are often the only other humans who ever physically touch them. When you are observing that half of the senior population that you see as "bitter and always on the lookout for something ANYTHING to complain about" you might want to think about the fact that they don't have far to look.
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Old 01-12-2015, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,785 posts, read 4,838,667 times
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Since the term "retiree" encompasses people from age 50 to 100+, I don't think that any stereotype is true for most retirees, but that most stereotypes ARE TRUE for SOME retirees. OP your post starts discussing stereotypes about seniors and then changes to a question about retirees. I don't mean to be a stickler, but those terms are not synonymous. Not all retirees are seniors, and not all seniors are retirees. So I think maybe some terms need to be specified. To most (arguably) a senior is over 65, but a retiree can be as young as 45 or 50.
Living in a community of mostly retirees, the difference is obvious, but not necessarily clear-cut. As boomers (again a term that encompasses a large and varied group) retire en masse, retirement communities will see changes. I, personally, don't mind the differences, but they definitely put the lie to many stereotypes. As far as the poor driving, I see more Corvettes here than in any other place I've lived. Apparently retired people like to indulge their automotive fantasies. I do see many seniors here that do fall into the slow, bad driving stereotype, and they certainly frustrate the retirees and others that live around here. I also think that the stereotype of seniors doing things at early hours is true, at least here. The streets are virtually empty after 9:30 pm.
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Old 01-12-2015, 02:37 PM
 
179 posts, read 188,334 times
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We recently joined a club where people "over 50" could go out to eat together. Since they chose all places with the early afternoon senior specials it was great and affordable.

After three times we had to bail because all the people wanted to talk about was medical treatments. One woman leaned over and asked me what medical tests I had had recently. That made our decision to move on from the clulb.

We do have other groups that are interesting and fun and we are learning new things.
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Old 01-12-2015, 04:12 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old_cold View Post
Stereotypes?

That all old people go out for dinner at 4 in the afternoon.
Only those who obsess over and post incessantly about pensions, Soc. Scty. and other financial matters.

Gotta get them early-bird speshuls don't ya know!
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Old 01-12-2015, 04:12 PM
 
6,321 posts, read 5,058,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
I know several older people -- about half of whom are persnickety busybodies, bitter and always on the lookout for something ANYTHING to complain about, and everything is just awful all the time, while they are keeping busy (although in my opinion not busy enough). The rest keep busy and keep active.

So the "get off my lawn" contingent in the geezer world is alive and well, but it certainly isn't all of them.

But it bothers me, as I am toe dipping range of geezerhood at 55, that the women I see who are bitter and unpleasant are childless and alone. While I'm not alone, we are childless by choice and I'm wondering if not raising children and having to give of myself is what makes them just awful.... I don't want to be a miserable cuss in my old age -- life is too sweet for that, and sometimes I am little worried about that....
Maybe they are childless and alone because they were bitter and unpleasant in their prime partner finding years?

I don't have kids and not bitter and unpleasant - lol.
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Old 01-12-2015, 05:42 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,759 posts, read 7,038,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
I know several older people -- about half of whom are persnickety busybodies, bitter and always on the lookout for something ANYTHING to complain about, and everything is just awful all the time, while they are keeping busy (although in my opinion not busy enough). The rest keep busy and keep active.

So the "get off my lawn" contingent in the geezer world is alive and well, but it certainly isn't all of them.

But it bothers me, as I am toe dipping range of geezerhood at 55, that the women I see who are bitter and unpleasant are childless and alone. While I'm not alone, we are childless by choice and I'm wondering if not raising children and having to give of myself is what makes them just awful.... I don't want to be a miserable cuss in my old age -- life is too sweet for that, and sometimes I am little worried about that....


With that outlook I can't imagine that you'll be a miserable old cuss. From what I've seen, it seems as though most "old folks" perspectives and the way they deal with life around them is pretty much an extension of how they looked at and dealt with life when they were younger. Unless, of course, there's a change in personality due to Alzheimer's disease or other dementia, but that could happen to anyone.
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Old 01-12-2015, 06:01 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,759 posts, read 7,038,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
When I read stories that say that many baby boomers are in a lot of debt and are financially irresponsible, I think that is true. This is just based on personal experience and a few people I know. Some boomers have paid off their houses and may not be in a lot of debt, but a disturbing number of the ones I know haven't.

As opposed to the previous generation of retirees, the boomers I know seem to really want nice homes for retirement, even if they can't really afford it. Is this just a boomer thing? The previous generation seemed satisfied with staying in their lifetime houses during retirement. There are some old neighbors I have in their 80s-90s and they just stayed put in their houses it seems.

Some of the boomers also got late mortgages at like 50+...to get bigger or better houses. And are now having to work or are having serious financial difficulty. Now that I think of it, getting a 30 year mortgage at 50 seems like a bad idea. Many boomers are smart and youthful, but most employers think they are old or overpaid, so in some cases my friends or colleagues got burned bad by job discrimination.

I know 6 couples like this. They are of various colors, but mostly white, and have varying degrees of education from trade school to post graduate. I'm not sure why they want to work forever just to pay for housing. I'm also not sure why having a luxurious lifestyle that they did not have while working seems so important to so many people during retirement.
Boy, talk about stereotyping! While I know stories abound about "Baby Boomers" being so self-centered, short-sighted, requiring the latest and greatest fad/gadget and wanting it NOW, and being seriously in debt as a result, I can assure you it's not true for all boomers.

My husband and I are boomers- at the leading edge as he was born in 1946 and I in 1947- and we worked for everything we had, lived within our means, went without when we needed to, and saved money from the time we started working. We didn't buy fancy cars, the latest gadgets, or Mcmansions, and didn't take long expensive vacations, and it's amazing how much money one can save when one has no need to keep up with the Joneses or with the latest fads.

Yes, we wanted a nice retirement home and planned a good retirement, and our plans now are to be as debt free as possible, and we're pretty much there. We live in a house we built for retirement and financed it with an equity line of credit on the house we formerly lived in, after we had paid off the mortgage on that house. So now we have a new house with no mortgage, our cars are paid for ( although they aren't new) pay off the balance on our credit cards each month. (when we use them).

Our life isn't what I would call luxurious, but we have what we need, are content with what we have, and with our lot in life.
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Old 01-12-2015, 06:21 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,917 posts, read 2,016,119 times
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Two observations of stereotypes that in my opinion have some truth:

1.) Older people do tend to take their time more in conversations, take longer to tell a story, "ramble" on, etc.
This can be good and bad. It's not always as fun for the person who, unfortunately, does have time pressures whether they want to or not, as it is for the person who "has all the time in the world because I'm retired" (often stated as a direct quote by the retiree ).

But the flip side of this is that older people tend to let someone else talk to, and not rush them through conversations and be as abrupt, so from that standpoint, conversations are much more pleasant and relaxed, especially when the non-retiree/older person has a more leisurely time frame themselves.

2.) I've noticed that as people get older, generally (not always) they become milder natured. Some people may disagree with this, but I've especially noticed this in stereotypical Type A people, who may have gotten bent out shape about something with proverbial steam coming out their ears in their 20's, 30's and 40's, but start to calm down in their 50's and really become more mellow in their 60's and beyond. It's as if they are finally taking a breath and realizing life's too finite to get bent out of shape over the little things. Of course, in a minority of older folks, the mellowness goes in the opposite direction, and they get bent out of shape over smaller things (getting irate that leaves from the neighbors' trees are falling onto their yard, etc.). Oddly enough, this seems to be people who were more mellow when they were younger and they move in the opposite direction.

Disclaimer: I'm not a senior citizen or retired, but humbly acknowledge that I will be one day (hopefully) and submit this opinion respectfully.

Last edited by Jowel; 01-12-2015 at 07:22 PM..
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