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Old 01-21-2015, 09:22 AM
 
Location: No. Virginia, USA
328 posts, read 476,733 times
Reputation: 317

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Most of them , but they don't annoy me. I'd have to care. I like being a geezer.
+1 for you. This has been the biggest surprise for me. When I was younger I thought 40 was over the hill, and basically it was all downhill from there. I actually now find (in 60ís) more contentment, pleasure in the simpler things. Really, if your health holds out, these should be the best years of your lives.
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Old 01-22-2015, 05:43 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,838 posts, read 18,855,957 times
Reputation: 33746
Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
The man talking about not having a life outside of his dr. appts may be trying to make light of his situation and inject some humor into a grim time of life and keep things in perspective. My Dad had cancer 20 years ago and was disgusted that his life was not his own during the time of his treatment. Surgery, chemo, scans, bloodwork and dr. appts was his routine for well over two years. I call it being caught in the loop and its hard to get out sometimes. Complications or adverse reactions to treatments and discovery of different illnesses, related or not to the original condition, may pop up and it can become endless. It's easy to say someone must have a sad life if it only consists of their medical appts., but it's something they have to think about everyday and fit their life around. Hopefully it's a short term condition and not a life long obsession.

I dont like listening to health problems of others either, but I do understand their need to unburden themselves. Their need to verbalize what they are experiencing and my dislike of hearing it, are both based on fear, underneath it all.
You're right--great post.

I came in here just now to verbalize something I heard from our senior center. I never go there, they offer bingo and that's about it and they close at 3pm. Now they are going to have a men's discussion group. That's good except the suggested topics are: the past, how it used to be in town, what do you remember, how things were better back then. Huh? Is that what they really think people want to talk about? How about sports, current events, travel, suggested improvements for the town. It's the stereotype about putting old people out to pasture, not thinking that they can still be interested and involved.
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Old 01-22-2015, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,618 posts, read 9,682,513 times
Reputation: 10960
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcopolo View Post
The stereotype about retirees driving Mercurys or Buicks is definitely out of date. I see a lot more Camrys than anything else in the retirement communities.
I drive a Buick. Not because it was what I wanted though. I really wanted another Honda Accord! But I had certain critera for a car and ended up with exactly what I wanted...except for the make and model. Sigh. I WILL be getting another Honda next time around though.

I live in an area that has a LOT of retirees. I see cars of every make and model being driven here but I do believe there are more Hondas and Toyotas than anything else.
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Old 01-22-2015, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,618 posts, read 9,682,513 times
Reputation: 10960
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
And they shouldn't drive. But let's get real. What kind of support would be available in your community if it were suddenly proposed to spend billions of tax dollars on effective public transit?

I have had to wrest car keys from an elder for the safety of the community. And my reward is never-ending. I now get to chauffeur her every single place she needs to go. I'm not blaming her, though. Our nation offers very few choices to seniors who do not drive.
I did the same thing. Mom didn't want to drive so I became her driver. I didn't mind, except when I'd JUST get home from a long day at work and she just HAD to go somewhere. We do have public transport here but I wouldn't make my mom walk three long blocks to catch a bus. There are agencies here that will pick up and deliver folks and they don't charge much of anything. We were just planning on how to work that for her when she passed away.
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Old 01-22-2015, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,618 posts, read 9,682,513 times
Reputation: 10960
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
I appreciate my vehicle for the freedom it give me; plain and simple.never changed since I was a teen really.
You and me both! I am LOST if I don't have my car handy. It can sit in the driveway for days at a time but if I want to go somewhere it's there.
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:11 AM
 
1 posts, read 235 times
Reputation: 17
My mom lived to just a month shy of 97, and I watched how she kept engaged throughout her active years (until age 94 when health issues limited her): continued practice of her lifelong piano playing and, on occasion the organ at her church, working part-time as a transcription expert (until her late 80s), volunteering for Books for the Blind as a reader and then (when reading became difficult) as a text coder for other readers, many Elderhostel stays, research into a particular historical topic (the French medieval royal, Jeanne de France) that resulted in her self-published novel (at age 85) Nobody Rests in Peace. This is a retirement I can only hope to attain, on my optimistic days!
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Old 01-09-2019, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,664,674 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
You're right--great post.

I came in here just now to verbalize something I heard from our senior center. I never go there, they offer bingo and that's about it and they close at 3pm. Now they are going to have a men's discussion group. That's good except the suggested topics are: the past, how it used to be in town, what do you remember, how things were better back then. Huh? Is that what they really think people want to talk about? How about sports, current events, travel, suggested improvements for the town. It's the stereotype about putting old people out to pasture, not thinking that they can still be interested and involved.
There seems to be a lot of threads of this type of thing going around here in this forum these days. A little bit too heavy on the discussions of the old days, whether good or bad, for me. Maybe the stereotype isn't all that far from the truth.

My senior center has the obligatory bingo but we sort of make our own discussion groups after others meet like the writers or exercise group. Even people just hanging out in the common areas have some pretty good debates.

Tell you something though, if they did ever create a formal discussion group and called it a "men's group" there would be hell to pay from the women.
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Old 01-09-2019, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,579 posts, read 17,567,761 times
Reputation: 27661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
There seems to be a lot of threads of this type of thing going around here in this forum these days. A little bit too heavy on the discussions of the old days, whether good or bad, for me. Maybe the stereotype isn't all that far from the truth.

My senior center has the obligatory bingo but we sort of make our own discussion groups after others meet like the writers or exercise group. Even people just hanging out in the common areas have some pretty good debates.

Tell you something though, if they did ever create a formal discussion group and called it a "men's group" there would be hell to pay from the women.
I think a lot of that comes from the uncertainty in the world today.

It feels like no one is in charge and we're kind of just drifting along, possibly hitting an iceberg at any moment. Look at the news. Climate change. Frequent mass shootings. Complete political dysfunction. Employment stressors. Companies that were institutions like Sears are just going by the wayside. There's a lot of anxiety out there about technology. News and information comes at you at all times. We're overwhelmed.

I can see why people want to back to the simpler "old days."
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Old 01-09-2019, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Southeast Michigan
1,170 posts, read 972,380 times
Reputation: 1323
Life in the old days wasn't really all that great. Some things were worse, some better. Perhaps some people idealize the past because they were carefree as children and young adults, or maybe it's a matter of selective memory. For me, life is so much better now!
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Old 01-09-2019, 05:21 PM
 
6,995 posts, read 6,988,918 times
Reputation: 5806
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJintheD View Post
My mom lived to just a month shy of 97, and I watched how she kept engaged throughout her active years (until age 94 when health issues limited her): continued practice of her lifelong piano playing and, on occasion the organ at her church, working part-time as a transcription expert (until her late 80s), volunteering for Books for the Blind as a reader and then (when reading became difficult) as a text coder for other readers, many Elderhostel stays, research into a particular historical topic (the French medieval royal, Jeanne de France) that resulted in her self-published novel (at age 85) Nobody Rests in Peace. This is a retirement I can only hope to attain, on my optimistic days!
Your mom sounds like she was fantastic. Good for her! You have some good genes
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