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Old 01-14-2015, 11:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old_cold View Post
1862...yeah, that's when I thought they were around after seeing them mentioned in books.

LOL. What a terrible typo.

And, yes, I still drive -- but I guess I should give up typing.
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Old 01-14-2015, 12:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scratchie View Post
Part of the change is that we no longer have specific dances anymore. I love looking at these things at the link someone posted, where it lists out which dance they're going to play in which order, i.e. "Two-step", "Foxtrot", etc. Some record albums are like this, too (especially Latin music) where it tells you the dance (i.e. the rhythm) for each song on the record jacket (or CD booklet). The whole idea of having specific dances that go with specific songs has been lost for basically my entire life.
I'm far from retired, but as someone in his mid-30s who enjoys dancing (especially with my wife and daughters), I thought I would chime in on this.

First and foremost, there are very few formal dances anymore. Where in the past, there would be formal dances (Fall Ball, Homecoming, Junior and Senior Proms, etc.), they have been replaced with generic "dance" parties, even at weddings. The music is all modern rave/techno, and there is no formal dancing with a partner. The idea of lead and follower has seemed to have faded alongside the concept of courtship.

Even when there are attempts at formal dancing, rarely is this well-planned (much less published) by the musicians/DJ ahead of time. Many DJs and musicians try to read the crowd and adjust the music to the response of the crowd, with varying success. Dance cards are useless if you can't predict if the next song is a fox trot, cha-cha, or polka! scratchie is spot on about the lack of information even when formal dancing is attempted.

I would love to hear other experiences or stories about dance cards. They can be so sweet.
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Old 01-14-2015, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Kountze, Texas
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Have heard of them, but too young (50) to have ever used them.
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Old 01-14-2015, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TFW46 View Post
LOL. What a terrible typo.

And, yes, I still drive -- but I guess I should give up typing.
I was going to ask what brand of wrinkle cream you used or if the cocktail hour involved formaldehyde.
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Old 01-14-2015, 02:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike From NIU View Post
...I would love to hear other experiences or stories about dance cards. They can be so sweet.

I went to an all-girls' school. In 1962 and 1963 our school sponsored dances with the local all-boys' school. That's when the dance cards were used. As mentioned earlier, the dance cards were little booklets with pretty ribbons to tie around the girls' wrists.

A boy would sign his name in the booklet for whatever dances he wanted with that girl. Refusing to let a boy sign your dance card or refusing to honor the dance card signatures was not allowed. So, for the boys, I think it reduced the tension of asking a girl to dance and having her say no. For the girls, it was very nerve-racking, wondering if many boys would sign the dance cards.

Then, the next school day, many girls would bring their dance cards and compare them. I never did that because the dance cards were so special, and in a way, very private to me. I think the dance cards were wonderful, especially for shy guys or ones who didnt have a lot of self-confidence. And, for the girls who saved their dance cards, they must evoke wonderful memories of a simpler, more personal time.
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Old 01-14-2015, 02:26 PM
 
734 posts, read 1,735,296 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TFW46 View Post
I went to an all-girls' school. In 1962 and 1963 our school sponsored dances with the local all-boys' school. That's when the dance cards were used. As mentioned earlier, the dance cards were little booklets with pretty ribbons to tie around the girls' wrists.

A boy would sign his name in the booklet for whatever dances he wanted with that girl. Refusing to let a boy sign your dance card or refusing to honor the dance card signatures was not allowed. So, for the boys, I think it reduced the tension of asking a girl to dance and having her say no. For the girls, it was very nerve-racking, wondering if many boys would sign the dance cards.

Then, the next school day, many girls would bring their dance cards and compare them. I never did that because the dance cards were so special, and in a way, very private to me. I think the dance cards were wonderful, especially for shy guys or ones who didnt have a lot of self-confidence. And, for the girls who saved their dance cards, they must evoke wonderful memories of a simpler, more personal time.
I was really shy in high school (and much of college), so I was one of those guys hesitant to ask someone to dance in case she said no. Dance cards would have been a relief, though I still would have had the nerve to go sign it!

Of course, I can see the angst for the girls who didn't get many signatures on her card. Of course, without dance cards, you might be a wallflower and wonder with each song if a boy might ask you to dance this one.

I'll have to ask my parents (graduated in 1963) if they had dance cards growing up.
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Old 01-14-2015, 02:57 PM
 
15,149 posts, read 19,783,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike From NIU View Post
I was really shy in high school (and much of college), so I was one of those guys hesitant to ask someone to dance in case she said no. Dance cards would have been a relief, though I still would have had the nerve to go sign it!

Of course, I can see the angst for the girls who didn't get many signatures on her card. Of course, without dance cards, you might be a wallflower and wonder with each song if a boy might ask you to dance this one.

I'll have to ask my parents (graduated in 1963) if they had dance cards growing up.

Believe me, I think the girls were more nervous than the boys about those dance cards. The boys could come up and sign your dance card without even introducing themselves first. They might have been shy but they were guaranteed as many dances as they signed up for. (Please excuse my ending that sentence with a preposition.) And, while I'm sure there were snotty girls in those days, the majority, even those of us who were very attractive, were raised to be polite and not show displeasure with the guys who signed our dance cards.
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Old 01-14-2015, 03:07 PM
 
5,820 posts, read 5,192,889 times
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The very first antique I bought as a kid was a dance card pencil in a silver pencil holder with engraved initials on it. So pretty.

(Hmmm - where did that go, I wonder??)
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Old 01-14-2015, 03:12 PM
 
15,149 posts, read 19,783,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
The very first antique I bought as a kid was a dance card pencil in a silver pencil holder with engraved initials on it. So pretty. ..

I wanted to address the pencils that also had ribbons to attach to our wrists but I couldnt recall exactly what they looked like. I think I recall some dance card having pencils attached directly to them.

And it breaks my heart to hear them addressed as antiques.
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Old 01-14-2015, 03:19 PM
 
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I looked up "dance cards" on eBay. Here's a sample of what the dance cards I used looked like (although this one is from 1912 and I'm not). Notice that the songs were identified so the guys would know what dances they were signing up for. A guy who didnt know how to slow-dance could sign up only for fast dances and vice versa.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/University-o...item2edc407879


And here are more samples, mostly from a much earlier time:

http://www.ebay.com/sch/Collectibles...nkw=dance+card
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