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Old 01-13-2015, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,451 posts, read 21,283,365 times
Reputation: 24296

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I don't think most people can truly visualize life without structure, with too much freedom on one's hands. I'll be 65 in April, I've been working 4 days a week for the past 12 years, and with vacation time, I've been taking every other Monday off the past year, as a winding down process. Come April, on Medicare I'll cut down to 3 days a week, then to 2 by year end, to slowly adjust to more freedom in my life! The idea of going cold turkey?

At work, on the really stressful days I dream and dream of my freedom. On the days I really enjoyed being there, the dreams go flying out the window!

Not really sure yet how well I'll adapt to the world of freedom, and I'm sure I'm not the only one!
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Old 01-14-2015, 12:29 AM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,230,179 times
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I certainly understand one post's advice about not focusing on the finish line too soon. I HOPE I can find something to take my mind off of dreaming about retirement 8-11 years away. At 54, I'm just done caring about work. I've BEEN checked out.

It hasn't helped that starting 10 years ago I had to assume more responsibility for an elderly aunt (her finances, health etc.) then 5 years ago my mom started with dementia, in the last year before she passed in October I was really spending more time on that. So on one hand I guess it's to be expected that I couldn't give a rats a$$ about work, and I'm burned out and just tired. On the other, how do I once again care about work? 8-11 years is a long time to be trapped on the hamster wheel. NO ONE I know personally who was truly THROUGH with caring about work was ever able to care about it again. Long vacations didn't help. 6 month sabbaticals didn't help. They went back to work and in two weeks were just as done as they were before.

Even KNOWING that I'm trading my 8 hours a work day-plus commute for the money I make for my lifestyle, doesn't really make it any easier to deal with the 'prison' the OP makes reference to.

Am I "trapped?' No. Because I COULD quit. It wouldn't be practical. It would make no financial sense at all. The price of not working now is just too high. I guess I readily confess I'm lazy and staying with my job and bemoaning it is just where I am right now. I just have to keep praying I can put in these next ten years and not suffer to much mentally along the way. I'm going to try to make it to spring before I take a vacation week.
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Old 01-14-2015, 01:45 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,688 posts, read 40,050,764 times
Reputation: 23831
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
I don't think most people can truly visualize life without structure, with too much freedom on one's hands. ... The idea of going cold turkey?
...
Cold turkey worked for me... Stuff will work out... no need to keep structure. Plenty to do / stay interested in.

@ age 49, (and 32 yrs service) I had enough, and Poof - gone. (no pension / no HC) but a very sweet parachute (2 yrs wages, free schooling, HC).

Took me about 100 strides to 'adjust' from 70 hr work weeks and high stress to "no-more".

Jumped in the car and did National Parks for a month.

~10 yrs later, I am still recovered. (did a PT work gig last yr overseas). Not cuz I had to or wanted to, but the timing was right, and I was able to leverage the income / employment to acquire 9 more income properties, and earn enough air miles for a 1 yr RTW trip (starting late 2015).

Hopefully the additional props will help take care of the pension shortfall. (They will be used as 'owner contract sales' in about 10 yrs)
I went back with previous employer, so the 6 wks vacation was quite helpful while working overseas and being paid to travel.

I too teach PT (after 12 yrs of Homeschooling, seems natural)

That is a really good PT gig for early retirees, and helps to stay engaged / updated in highly technical fields.

Stuff will work out... no need to keep structure. Plenty to do / stay interested in.

Do your best to stay engaged and burn up that vacation. You may find you miss paid vacation when retired!

Retire early, retire often... Too much fun to do just ONCE
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Old 01-14-2015, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,858,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
I can't wait for retirement either. I plan on staying here another 43 years and 5 months. I will be 92 then and will have worked here for just over 60 years.
That is dedication!!
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Old 01-16-2015, 08:35 AM
 
Location: NC
6,583 posts, read 8,017,660 times
Reputation: 13519
Knowing when you are going to retire should be invigorating. Suddenly all the BS seems to be limited. There is light at the end of the tunnel. Keep on doing your best, smile, and before you know it you will join the ranks of the happily 'done with it all'! But seriously, obsessing over it will not do you or your employer any good. Just have that happy feeling waiting in your subconscious for when today seems too annoying.
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Old 01-16-2015, 08:54 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
2,176 posts, read 2,090,768 times
Reputation: 2609
Volo,

Can I ever relate to your situation! We're about 18 months away from my retirement, and although I still enjoy my job, I too feel it's time to move on to the next phase of my life. I believe there are always aspects of any job that aren't great. It might be the commute (I share that one with you), it might be a co-worker who just grates on you for some reason, or the bureaucratic aspects of working in most any large organization. Years ago I could easily brush those things off, but now with the end of my working career near at hand I find I am becoming much less tolerant.

It's become worse since we bought our retirement home in north Idaho about a year ago. That made the future very real and concrete, and whenever we are there it feels more like home than the house we've been living in for the past 20 years.

I suppose there is nothing to be done about it but to keep busy so the time passes more quickly. We have a lot of things still to do in order to be ready to sell our house here in SoCal and get ready to make the move, so I look at all the time spent on those things as good time getting ready.

Dave
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Old 01-16-2015, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,434 posts, read 4,192,537 times
Reputation: 5727
Used to love my job, but between the bean counters and increased government oversight(medical device service), both state and federal, I am feeling the burnout. The job used to be fun. Now I have a countdown clock on my desktop as well, counting the time until I qualify for Medicare, this August. Financially, I shouldn't retire then, because our debts are too high and the house is upside down, but I feel that once I hit the Medicare point, I might be able to overlook the negative parts of the job, knowing I could pull the trigger anytime. In a couple years the value of the house might climb high enough to sell it and move somewhere else.

If I have to abandon everything and take the nuclear option of bankruptcy, and get out early, so be it. I could keep working until I am 80 and still have that happen anyway. Our SS and income from (protected) IRAs and 401Ks, would be fantastic without any debts.
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Old 01-16-2015, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Idaho
4,649 posts, read 4,486,616 times
Reputation: 9132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
Used to love my job, but between the bean counters and increased government oversight(medical device service), both state and federal, I am feeling the burnout. The job used to be fun. Now I have a countdown clock on my desktop as well, counting the time until I qualify for Medicare, this August. Financially, I shouldn't retire then, because our debts are too high and the house is upside down, but I feel that once I hit the Medicare point, I might be able to overlook the negative parts of the job, knowing I could pull the trigger anytime. In a couple years the value of the house might climb high enough to sell it and move somewhere else...
I understand completely! I'm a year behind you, turning 65 in the August after this next one. Based on the feedback in this thread as well as a little bit of research/discovery this week here at work, I'm going to open up my window to possibly retire when I'm medicare eligible in a year and a half. With the retiree medical benefit, I'll be in good shape for medical coverage, (want no part of the ACA basura).

Since I've been paying extra on the mortgage every month, I'm not upside-down, but the equity is thin, especially after paying a realtor's commission. Have one credit card that I could pay off at any time, but don't want to draw down my funds that way . . . at least not right now. Retiring in a year and a half says to me that I need to get serious about going through all my junk and either tossing it or take it to the Salvation Army thrift store. That's really not all that much time to get such a huge job accomplished. I'll still keep three years from now as the outer limit.

Hang in there. You're almost done. Just a hair more than six, short months!
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Old 01-16-2015, 11:40 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,524,402 times
Reputation: 29082
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
That is dedication!!
More like insanity!

Something I've mentioned before but will do so again is the decreased costs that come with retirement. No more commute costs and possibly parking costs. Dry cleaning and shirt laundering expenses go out the window. Lunches out a thing of the past. Office staff costs for birthdays, Christmas, end of year parties, etc. are no more. "Social" obligations - dinners, cocktail parties and things of that ilk - Wazzat?

If any or all of those are in your life now, calculate what you spend on them and retirement just might result in significant savings and not be as limiting as you might think.

Just a few things to think about. I haven't worn a starched, dress shirt in six years and love it
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Old 01-17-2015, 07:18 AM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,195 posts, read 2,866,336 times
Reputation: 4902
I received a promotion 5 years ago - seems like yesterday.

And with about 4.3 years to go until retirement - considering I have been working since I was 15 - that will seem like a flash in the pan.

I keep telling myself....
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