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Old 06-18-2015, 09:50 PM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,228,824 times
Reputation: 3330

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I'm union covered with seniority. And not that anyone is safe -- by any means, but I'm fairly certain that as long as my department exists at all, I'll be able to last another 10 years.

There'll be enough attrition from other worker retirements in the next five years that if they need any staff at all, I should be OK.

(Plus I'm up to almost a year's pay in severance so unless they try to screw people on that, I'll just have to find a way to be OK.)

At my job we all know no one wants to be there, but we're professionals and do our job. We're not stupid. It's a big corporation and we're all very experienced so we know what's expected. But fire in the belly, uh. A challenge. Promotion opportunity, uh, no. Fortunately for us it's a case of do your job, (put up with the usual corporate aggravations) go home and get paid. Put in your time....and then retire.

Last edited by rdflk; 06-18-2015 at 09:58 PM..
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Old 06-18-2015, 10:36 PM
 
1,734 posts, read 1,952,024 times
Reputation: 3901
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdflk View Post
I'm union covered with seniority. And not that anyone is safe -- by any means, but I'm fairly certain that as long as my department exists at all, I'll be able to last another 10 years.

...
Thank goodness for that!
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Old 06-18-2015, 11:31 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
749 posts, read 570,372 times
Reputation: 1543
I retired early because I got tired of busy work that had nothing to do with my job. I am a social worker and retired last year after 33 years. Last I checked that was a professional career. I also was a supervisor for many years. But the job became more about commuting to inaccessible offices to punch time clocks and be threatened with discipline if a minute late, rather than serving clients and protecting children. Every public agency has too few staff to safely manage workload, and the busywork, to please bean counters, made it less efficient. And I was supervised by anyone other than social workers who had no clue about how to deal with people. I just wore out and got completely bored. The hamster got tired of the wheel and wasn't able to help anyone. I retired at 56 but I am comfortable because I didn't do stupid things earlier in life, specifically having kids I could not afford. I have never taken on consumer debt, no longer have a house payment, and never bought into the consumerism that imprisons workers until their later years. No kids, therefore no kid crap to endebt myself for. No car payments...ever. Few major life changes. Only one divorce....had to learn only once that change costs money. But it takes being careful with money, planning, and not taking on debt to please the Joneses. It can be done. It is so easy to be suckered into wage slavery because of the consumer driven society in which we live. Fitting have every new gimmick, device, vehicle, fashion going. Just don't get suckered in. Even if you have hard luck and a setback, good habits will get you through much more quickly. Retiring was part of this as my job was destroying my health and sanity. Think common sense, not fads. No one should be trapped in their 70's working to pay off debt. I was lucky that I gave myself the choice by making good decisions early. No one cares now that I did not have a new car every year, but having my youth and time is wonderful!
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Old 06-19-2015, 12:16 AM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,228,824 times
Reputation: 3330
^^ Congratulations! There's nothing like having your time be your own!
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Old 06-19-2015, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,895 posts, read 25,351,824 times
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I wish I had taken a few more of those expensive type vacations before I retired. Maybe you could do some of that to alleviate the short timer syndrome? Australia, New Zealand, Tahiti. Someplace exotic that would give you something to look forward to between now and the end!
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Old 06-19-2015, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,138 posts, read 12,402,575 times
Reputation: 13987
The OP will never make it.

There are four landmarks to when you get ready to retire.

#1 is age 62 when you can start to collect benefits even if they are greatly reduced.

#2 Medicare eligibility. I big step towards saying the heck with it because you no longer need an employer to provide affordable medical coverage.

#3 Reaching full retirement age. This says you can be out of there if you want.

#4 When the lower earning spouse reaches full retirement age. I have hopes of going to 70 but if I go to 67 1/2 my wife will be at her full retirement age and will collect 50% of my FRA benefit. I like this idea, this is sort of like walking out the door together and beginning that big adventure.

As we grow older our fuses get shorter and burn brighter as well. If you are in a financial condition where you can hit the silk you will discover it doesn't take much to really light your fire. It doesn't take much because you don't need it like you used to.

Right now I am counting... 348 DAYS!

June 1, 2016 (this is what it appears like at this moment in time) I will be nearing 68 and will receive about $380/month more benefits than if I had retired at FRA of 66 and my wife will be signed up to collect her full benefit based on 50% of my FRA benefit. Also the beginning of SUMMER!

348 more days, less than one year.
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Old 07-06-2015, 09:16 PM
 
141 posts, read 127,708 times
Reputation: 316
Wow can I ever relate to this! I've had a "retirement yardstick" in my cubicle at work for almost three years. I have FIVE inches left until I retire. December 18, 2015.

I am a DOD (Army) civilian and wasn't given the opportunity for early retirement (not in the cards for you says my boss). Cannot wait to be free from all things Army.
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Old 07-07-2015, 04:35 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,911 posts, read 2,884,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nicet4 View Post
The OP will never make it.

There are four landmarks to when you get ready to retire.

#1 is age 62 when you can start to collect benefits even if they are greatly reduced.

#2 Medicare eligibility. I big step towards saying the heck with it because you no longer need an employer to provide affordable medical coverage.

#3 Reaching full retirement age. This says you can be out of there if you want.

#4 When the lower earning spouse reaches full retirement age. I have hopes of going to 70 but if I go to 67 1/2 my wife will be at her full retirement age and will collect 50% of my FRA benefit. I like this idea, this is sort of like walking out the door together and beginning that big adventure.

As we grow older our fuses get shorter and burn brighter as well. If you are in a financial condition where you can hit the silk you will discover it doesn't take much to really light your fire. It doesn't take much because you don't need it like you used to.

Right now I am counting... 348 DAYS!

June 1, 2016 (this is what it appears like at this moment in time) I will be nearing 68 and will receive about $380/month more benefits than if I had retired at FRA of 66 and my wife will be signed up to collect her full benefit based on 50% of my FRA benefit. Also the beginning of SUMMER!

348 more days, less than one year.
If you are fortunate enough to have a job with an employer with decent benefits, I would add a landmark at 63.5 - the COBRA bridge to Medicare. That's what I had planned/hoped for, though the skyrocketing costs are making it far less certain as it draws near. That is 7 years away for me.

Another landmark is closer - 59.5 - only 3 years out for me. That is when I could start using some 401k money. If I were to lose the job I have now after that, I would go ahead and purchase the downsized place in my desired retirement location, move in and take a contract or freelance from that location. I am not a vain person, but I am pretty good at what I do; I have never been unemployed for more than a few weeks and always chosen between multiple offers. Even as an older worker in today's market I would be able to find something quickly, especially if I took a little below market rate.

When it seems like it is unbearably far away, look back at something that happened that far in the past and if you are like me, it won't seem like it was that long ago. Yes, it is just a simple mind trick but it helps.
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Old 07-07-2015, 05:27 AM
 
761 posts, read 640,088 times
Reputation: 2229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cnynrat View Post
Volo,

Can I ever relate to your situation! We're about 18 months away from my retirement, and although I still enjoy my job, I too feel it's time to move on to the next phase of my life. I believe there are always aspects of any job that aren't great. It might be the commute (I share that one with you), it might be a co-worker who just grates on you for some reason, or the bureaucratic aspects of working in most any large organization. Years ago I could easily brush those things off, but now with the end of my working career near at hand I find I am becoming much less tolerant.

It's become worse since we bought our retirement home in north Idaho about a year ago. That made the future very real and concrete, and whenever we are there it feels more like home than the house we've been living in for the past 20 years.

I suppose there is nothing to be done about it but to keep busy so the time passes more quickly. We have a lot of things still to do in order to be ready to sell our house here in SoCal and get ready to make the move, so I look at all the time spent on those things as good time getting ready.

Dave
For me, it is the bureaucratic administrivia that is getting old. The status reports, all hands meetings and IM pings for things that I don't seem to care as much about as I used to.
Let's face it, this close to retirement, I am not bucking for a promotion and there is no upward ladder for me to climb. So....the countdown has commenced. Just hoping the 401K doesn't tank in the meantime as it is my "pension". Planning to wait until FRA at 66 for SS to kick in.
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Old 07-07-2015, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Idaho
4,639 posts, read 4,482,074 times
Reputation: 9094
Since this thread was resurrected, I'd thought I'd give an update on my emotional state. I'll turn 64 next month and have decided to retire when I reach 65 and am medicare eligible. One of my retiree benefits from my employer will be funds to pay for a medicare advantage or medigap policy, so my medical needs will be covered. (Still trying to figure out that stuff.)

The exact timing is not set yet. It could be the beginning of next August, the beginning of next September, or maybe I'll wait until the turn of the new year, (not this upcoming year, the next one after this one). Reason for uncertain date is that I need to really figure out the tax consequences of each possible date. There are also a whole slew of paid holidays from the end of November to past the beginning of the new year. The current plan is to delay social security benefits for a year or two and live on savings until I do start benefits. I'll have to decide by the end of this year when I'll actually retire because my project managers want me to take six months to train my replacement. I guess my 'job' is that complex/complicated, (satellite instrument operations).

I'm not quite so anxious anymore because I'll be selling the house and realize that in this last year remaining, I have a whole TON of work to do getting rid of really good 'stuff' and performing some minor repair/maintenance work on the house. Looking at how much needs to be done and how little time there is to do it, the time will go all to quickly and I'm sure I'll wish for more.

Downsizing is really emotionally draining. Every single piece of paper or 'stuff' I pick up has to have a decision made about it. Do I want to haul it to my new abode? Do I really need to keep this? Maybe I should just replace it when I get resettled? Making thousands of decisions is mentally draining.
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