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Old 03-27-2011, 12:12 AM
 
4,135 posts, read 9,420,986 times
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The OP needs to go to BOTH the SS office and her Civil Service Retirement Office with her information. This always depends on who you worked for, if you paid into the SS system, if you are affected by any offset and it isn't something you should do yourself or listen to someone on a board.
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My husband and I worked and paid SS our entire lives. We also worked for a public school system and paid into our pensions. Where we live, we can collect both, w/ no offset. If we lived or had worked in many other states, our pension would not be run by a fully funded retirement system and, in many cases, we'd not have paid into SS and would have offset problems.

Everyone is different. You need to do your homework
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Old 03-27-2011, 04:10 AM
 
3,752 posts, read 9,604,552 times
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here is the link to a fact sheet (pretty readable) from SSA on the exact question asked:

Government Pension Offset
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Old 03-27-2011, 11:12 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,932,349 times
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I see it now. Well at least its better than when two pay into SS and then the survivers has to chose taking just the highest and losing the other.
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Old 03-28-2011, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,737,509 times
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Default Not entirely true

Quote:
Originally Posted by arwenmark View Post
Certainly the OP needs to contact SS but the question is can someone who recieves a government pension also recieve spousal survivor benefits after the death of a spouse who DID work under SS and was receiving benefits.

I cannot see any reason why such a spouse would not receive survivor benefits equal to her husbands benefit. If she never worked at all she would receive them.
If her husband had a pension from where ever he had worked his SS would not have been reduced because of it. So why would her spousal survivor benefit be reduced or denied?
The sentence which I placed in bold type is not correct, provided that the pension was a "substantial" one as defined by Social Security. This situation is covered under the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP), and I would suggest going to the SS website (www.socialsecurity.gov) to get authoritative information about it. I am not suggesting that Arwenmark posted the above in bad faith, but it does illustrate the dangers of throwing things out to strangers in a public forum. I'm on the side of those who said to go to a SS office - actually you do not even need an appointment but having one will reduce your waiting time once you arrive.
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Old 03-29-2011, 09:02 AM
 
8,197 posts, read 11,913,206 times
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There is a lot of misinformation from the respondents on this thread, including a misunderstanding of how both WEP and GPO work, not to mention to whom it pertains. (I received training from Social Security on these specific issues and used to give seminars on this subject to federal employees.)

I'm not going to go into detail on these issues now because the OP is over three years old and it would serve no purpose.
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:18 PM
 
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Can my Mother who, is 76 years old, who worked part time and some full time during her life, draw SS for herself and a portion of my deceased father who paid in for many years before becoming disabled? Mom currently only receives, a little over $750 per month, and gets $150 food assistance, from the State. Can you help her? Thanks, Doug Best
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Northern panhandle WV
3,007 posts, read 2,171,440 times
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When your father died she should have been switched to receiving 100 percent of his Retirement SS amount. Did she take this up with SS at the time your father died? Was he collecting SS disabilty before he died or had he reached full retirement age and been collecting regular SS retirement benefit? your mother would have been entitled to half of his while he was alive, assuming half of his was more than her own would have been, plus he would have gotten his full amount, then when he died SS should have switched her to his full amount and dropped her own or her half of his. Did any of this happen?
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:59 PM
 
13,773 posts, read 33,909,853 times
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I agree.. she is entitled to his IF his SS when he passed away was more than hers. I received my late husband's SS after he passed away until my SS was more.

She needs to call SS to find out. They normally do this automatically if she listed him as being her X husband.
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,217,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bcbest View Post
Can my Mother who, is 76 years old, who worked part time and some full time during her life, draw SS for herself and a portion of my deceased father who paid in for many years before becoming disabled? Mom currently only receives, a little over $750 per month, and gets $150 food assistance, from the State. Can you help her? Thanks, Doug Best
It depends. Were your parents married and if so, how long were they married? If married, did the marriage end by divorce or your father's death? Edited to add: Did your mother remarry, if so, how old was she when she remarried?

Is it possible your mother is, in fact, receiving survivor benefits on your father's account? How old was your father before he became disabled?

P.S.- Every poster, including me, will tell you to take your mother into Social Security to have your question answered. Nevertheless, the answers to my questions will allow several of us to provide some WAGs.

Last edited by lenora; 03-21-2012 at 04:13 PM.. Reason: Add a question.
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Old 03-21-2012, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,888 posts, read 25,323,560 times
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Make an appointment with SS and discuss it with them. I was told I could collect 1/2 of my H's SS as a widow's benefit when I turn 60.
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