U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-20-2015, 07:21 AM
 
3,492 posts, read 4,958,642 times
Reputation: 5383

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoot N Annie View Post
I'll quit driving when you pry my cold dead fingers off the steering wheel.
Will plan to die holding the steering wheel after you cause a fatal accident? /good nature teasing
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-20-2015, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,116 posts, read 8,158,301 times
Reputation: 18774
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
- oh good she will kill us both instead of just herself and any other innocents on the road!
I'm 67, still an excellent driver...but I can't tell you how many times I've almost been taken out by hot-shot youngsters in a hurry to go nowhere in particular, who don't know how to drive defensively, and who were not trained properly to drive in bad weather. This I blame on the commercial "driving schools". I was taught to drive by an uncle when I was 15 and had a learner's permit (got my license on my 16th birthday, because my family needed me to), and was taught very well indeed.

Up here in Maine, it can snow at any time from Oct through May, and the roads can be slick even outside of that time frame. I try to avoid travel until the roads are cleared (yeah...me, with a plow on my truck!) due to the crazy fish-tailing and spinouts that always seem to have a younger driver involved. Spare me!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2015, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,788 posts, read 4,841,461 times
Reputation: 19474
MIL decided for herself and handed her keys over at about 83. It was time because she was unable to navigate in her new community (would get lost) and was frightened of the freeway. I can remember how funny I thought it was when I made a wrong turn and she became scared and tried to insist that we just go home and try again tomorrow! She honestly thought that I wouldn't be able to correct my mistake and get us where we were going, 3 miles from home...LOL.
It's really scary when they won't give up driving because the flexibility in their neck and shoulders prevents them from turning their head completely and cut people off without realizing it. Have you ever noticed how everyone who drives through the front of a store is always 80+? They always say that they pressed on the brake but the car wouldn't stop. In reality they are pressing on the gas and, for some reason, it doesn't occur to them that if the car is accelerating they are on the wrong pedal.

Living here in a mostly senior community, we are often exasperated by the "silver tops" driving 10 miles UNDER the speed limit, and taking W-I-I-I-D-E turns, braking for no apparent reason, driving astraddle of the double yellow line, driving miles with the blinker on, or not using it at all when it's needed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2015, 10:25 AM
 
2,063 posts, read 1,306,532 times
Reputation: 10031
I took away all my father's keys the day he came home 8 hours after he said he would be back and couldn't account for where he had been the whole time and had a cracked in headlight. There had been another incident where he got lost and ended up about 4 hours past where he was trying to go before then. He yelled at me and my sisters about it for 4 years. He still brings it up occasionally and it's been 7-8 years now. He was somewhere around 73-75 and not in the greatest health.

My mother is 72 now and drives as well as she ever did. I can't imagine she will have to give up her car for a long time, but when the time does come, she won't complain.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2015, 01:11 PM
 
Location: State of Washington (2016)
3,568 posts, read 2,393,346 times
Reputation: 13892
My godmother decided to stop driving when she was 80 years old (she is 96 now). She was still driving very well but didn't want to risk someone running into her and having slower reflexes (We are in California by the way). Heck, the way the people in Glendale drive, I have to really stay on top of my game at 42!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2015, 03:12 PM
 
8,977 posts, read 8,112,623 times
Reputation: 19497
We have to consider that the new 80, is the old 60 of just a few years ago.

A person in their 80s in good health, can have good reflexes and mental abilities, and be a good and safe driver.

On the there are people half their age in their 40s who are prematurely coming down with dementia, or alzheimers disease, or have a physical or mental problem that should not be driving as they would be dangerous to be on the road.

When to stop driving, depends on the vision, reaction time, ability, mental conditions, etc. Some people should stop driving at 40, and others well into their 90s.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2015, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
5,055 posts, read 6,022,820 times
Reputation: 9437
I will never quit driving.

I may, however, be limited to 2-3 miles to the store on a side street during the day.

I do know that at some point, I will have to stop driving on freeways and main roads.

Fortunately, at this point, there is no one to pry the car keys out of my hand, and I will downsize to a tiny car when it gets time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2015, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,557,559 times
Reputation: 29033
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
My mother had problems and I told her she should not be driving any more. We went to the doctor for complete check up and doc said "Give her keys back and always be with her to point out any problems" - oh good she will kill us both instead of just herself and any other innocents on the road!

I decided to let her drive home from the doc. We ended up in a ditch and damage to the car. I took her keys away right then. Her dementia (loss of spatial perspective is a real sign) became really obvious and progressively worse until she decided I had stolen her car from her.
It's shocking how many times doctors support impaired elders driving. If I knew that a doctor had told my elderly parents they were OK to drive and they got in a serious accident, I would consider suing.

Here is a list of reasons it's not safe for many elders to drive:

-If mental responses are slowed considerably (could be from depression, medication, or just old age).
-If there are vision problems that aren't or can't be corrected (including cataracts, the beginning of macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, corneal disease, glaucoma, etc.)
-If the driver has an inability to move his or her head from side-to-side or can't get their foot on the brake quickly (can be caused by arthritis, spinal stenosis, neuralgia, etc.)
-Neurological problems such as Parkinson's.
-Cognitive issues caused by small strokes or the beginnings of dementia or Alzheimer's, etc.
-Cardiovascular disease that could cause a sudden heart attack or stroke.

Accidents are caused often enough by people who don't know they have those problems. For elders to be diagnosed with them and still continue to drive is, in my opinion, criminally negligent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2015, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,745 posts, read 4,219,341 times
Reputation: 6866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
It's shocking how many times doctors support impaired elders driving. If I knew that a doctor had told my elderly parents they were OK to drive and they got in a serious accident, I would consider suing.

Here is a list of reasons it's not safe for many elders to drive:

-If mental responses are slowed considerably (could be from depression, medication, or just old age).
-If there are vision problems that aren't or can't be corrected (including cataracts, the beginning of macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, corneal disease, glaucoma, etc.)
-If the driver has an inability to move his or her head from side-to-side or can't get their foot on the brake quickly (can be caused by arthritis, spinal stenosis, neuralgia, etc.)
-Neurological problems such as Parkinson's.
-Cognitive issues caused by small strokes or the beginnings of dementia or Alzheimer's, etc.
-Cardiovascular disease that could cause a sudden heart attack or stroke.

Accidents are caused often enough by people who don't know they have those problems. For elders to be diagnosed with them and still continue to drive is, in my opinion, criminally negligent.
My father has macular degeneration and early dementia. He had a minor accident last week but I doubt either his retinal specialist or neurologist will advise him to stop driving. If it doesn't snow tomorrow, I intend to take my Dad to the retinal specialist for his monthly examination. I'd be willing to bet his vision is still sufficient to meet the MVA's regulations. (Good eye is 20/10 without glasses. He can't see the letter E with his bad eye but retains peripheral vision.) As far as the dementia, there is a family disagreement as to whether he is demented. I've scheduled a sibling meeting for this coming weekend. It is not going to be pleasant.

BTW, it seems that most men over the age of 60 have some type of cardiovascular disease. I don't know of any state that would prohibit them from driving. Oh, I'd add unstable diabetes to your list. My brother-in-law lost consciousness and smashed into a highway barrier because of some type of glucose issue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2015, 11:37 PM
 
10,818 posts, read 8,067,156 times
Reputation: 17029
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
BTW, it seems that most men over the age of 60 have some type of cardiovascular disease.
I went looking for stats on this and couldn't find any. Your source?
That's not to say cardiovascular disease isn't a problem. According to John Hopkins it's at least a problem as big for women as it is for men. I'm curious about your claim.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top