U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-02-2015, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Asheville NC
1,611 posts, read 1,317,837 times
Reputation: 4200

Advertisements

We are enjoying our retirement in Asheville. It is incredibly beautiful. People are helpful and friendly. There are many free and cheap events to keep one entertained. We could not ask for better weather--as we enjoy all of the seasons. The music and food available here rivals that of a much larger city. Some people feel that real estate is too expensive. But that is relative to where you are from. We have found the cost of living,for us, to be less.

We always knew that Western North Carolina was where we wanted to retire. We have spent 40 plus years vacationing in these mountains. We have life long friends with second homes here. We have artist friends who visit regularly. We enjoy our neighbors--most of whom are quite a bit younger. We have found good doctors and caring vets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-02-2015, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,759,876 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by funisart View Post
We are enjoying our retirement in Asheville. It is incredibly beautiful. People are helpful and friendly. There are many free and cheap events to keep one entertained. We could not ask for better weather--as we enjoy all of the seasons. The music and food available here rivals that of a much larger city. Some people feel that real estate is too expensive. But that is relative to where you are from. We have found the cost of living,for us, to be less.

We always knew that Western North Carolina was where we wanted to retire. We have spent 40 plus years vacationing in these mountains. We have life long friends with second homes here. We have artist friends who visit regularly. We enjoy our neighbors--most of whom are quite a bit younger. We have found good doctors and caring vets.
I would assume that Ashville is high enough in elevation that the heat and humidity of the summer are bearable. Is that true?

Twice I have visited a cousin in Blue Ridge, Georgia, which is some ten miles south of the Tennessee line. He has four genuine seasons but neither the summer nor the winter is severe. A few light snows during each winter, but no "problem" with snow. Warm in the summer, but not extreme like it is just a hundred or so miles to the south where is elevation is lower.

I would imagine my description of the Blue Ridge climate more or less applies to Ashville. Is that true?

To me the four-seasons-but-not-extreme climates are close to ideal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2015, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Asheville NC
1,611 posts, read 1,317,837 times
Reputation: 4200
Default yes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I would assume that Ashville is high enough in elevation that the heat and humidity of the summer are bearable. Is that true?

Twice I have visited a cousin in Blue Ridge, Georgia, which is some ten miles south of the Tennessee line. He has four genuine seasons but neither the summer nor the winter is severe. A few light snows during each winter, but no "problem" with snow. Warm in the summer, but not extreme like it is just a hundred or so miles to the south where is elevation is lower.

I would imagine my description of the Blue Ridge climate more or less applies to Ashville. Is that true?

To me the four-seasons-but-not-extreme climates are close to ideal.
Elevation decides temperature here. We are about 800ft higher than downtown Asheville, on a mountain --surrounded by other higher mountains. This gives us an unusual micro climate. We don't get nearly the amount of snowfall as the mountains to the north and west of Asheville.

I had to bundle up this morning to have coffee on our second story porch-and we just finished having lunch there a few minutes ago. Lately our lows have been 60's and the highs mid 80's, at our home, but 5 to 8 degrees warmer downtown. Not bad to be able to eat outside in August, with a breeze and no bugs. Everyone says this is the hottest summer they remember. Last winter we got a couple of days of record cold. But that was true all over I believe.

We get to enjoy an extra long spring. It starts at the lower elevations, then a few weeks to a month or so later here, then continues higher.

Each season has its own unique beauty.

Last edited by funisart; 08-02-2015 at 11:38 AM.. Reason: spell
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2015, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,806 posts, read 4,854,199 times
Reputation: 19517
I agree with the description of the Asheville climate. We are in a valley here in Tellico Village (near Knoxville) but are near to the mountains. Truly 4 season weather and the kindest, friendliest people I've ever met. The atmosphere in TV is very welcoming and nobody is a stranger for long. You can be as busy as you want or as relaxed as you want. What makes us so content is that we have made so many friends and everywhere we go we run into them. There are so many planned activities and impromptu get-togethers. I have not met anyone who said they were unhappy to live here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2015, 02:49 PM
 
1,820 posts, read 1,318,692 times
Reputation: 1091
After some years of looking around, we stayed right where we'd been for 45 years -- the verdant countryside of Northern Virginia just west of Washington, DC. We can afford it here and have been very happy over the years. Couldn't see a reason to leave.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-03-2015, 12:24 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,514,657 times
Reputation: 29081
Quote:
Originally Posted by Major Barbara View Post
After some years of looking around, we stayed right where we'd been for 45 years -- the verdant countryside of Northern Virginia just west of Washington, DC. We can afford it here and have been very happy over the years. Couldn't see a reason to leave.
I don't blame you. After living in Alexandria back in the mid-'70s while stationed at the Pentagon and
near Quantico in the late 50s I loved NOVA and would have retired there had not my pension been seriously reduced in a divorce.

But all's well that ends well and I'm more than just merely fine with where I am now. I can't imagine living anywhere else. There's a lot to be said for contentment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-03-2015, 12:48 PM
 
13,325 posts, read 25,590,184 times
Reputation: 20530
I am learning from these "place" threads that "bloom where you're planted" might well be the operative mantra. I am working to really understand that every place has its pluses and minuses, and I cannot look at a place with perfect views, say, and assume that I should live there when I'm not dependent on a location because of work. Same with weather. I personally would never move anywhere that had as humid a summer or more than where I currently live. I would move to a colder drier climate, but have to remember that humid summer is maybe ten weeks a year where I am, and moving somewhere is 52 weeks a year!

Now, if I genuinely could not afford where I am, I'd have to move. But hope I'd use the day-to-day life as a measure of where to go, not my vacation/tourist ideals.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-03-2015, 01:43 PM
 
1,820 posts, read 1,318,692 times
Reputation: 1091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
There's a lot to be said for contentment.
Indeed, and it can be found in many, many places. I think some sell contentment too cheaply. They move off to some distant clime upon retirement mostly because they think they are supposed to, they were impressed by somewhere during a brief visit, and they somehow think that they will be leaving only the bad things about where they live now (e.g, the traffic) behind when they go. We thought much more about the family, friends, and various other webs and networks that we've built up here that would take years and years and years to replace if we moved. This can be an expensive area to live in alright, but we are able to afford it and can't find much not to like about it. So why go? Plus, we don't drive in rush hour traffic anymore anyway. We are retired -- we sleep in and then enjoy a leisurely breakfast instead! Hahahaha!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2015, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,806 posts, read 4,854,199 times
Reputation: 19517
Major, that sounds like where you should be then. If you can afford it, like it, and have family and friends there, I agree, stay put. No matter where you go, there will be one or two things not to like, and you just avoid them, like the traffic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2015, 08:56 AM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,774 posts, read 14,888,814 times
Reputation: 11886
Growing up as a child we always lived in semi rural areas of NJ. Dad kept moving every time the area got too crowded. I was accustomed to semi rural and when I joined the work force we moved all over NJ trying to stay ahead of suburbia. When I retired 12 years ago the semi rural areas of NJ were no longer affordable.
Looking around the East coast I found parts of NC more like the NJ of the fifties so that is how we found ourselves settling in the semi rural area of Moore Co.
Yes it gets hot in the five month summer but I have not shoveled snow since we left and sadly our friends and relatives back in NJ have had more than their fair share, not to mention Sandy and the aftermath of that.

NC is not Utopia but few can afford the Hawaiian islands in retirement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top