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Old 02-01-2015, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,569,320 times
Reputation: 29034

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One thing never ceases to amaze me when people speak of ideal places in which to retire. Most people seem to assume that they will spend their retirement in the same state of physical and mental health that they have right at this moment. I take care of an elder in my home. I see all of her relatives and friends. Most of them put themselves somewhere they thought was idyllic when they retired in their sixties. Yet in ten or twenty years, they are now facing having to move YET AGAIN. Why?

They chose a place not at all attuned to the needs of people whose abilities are waning. They bought homes in places where one cannot function without driving a car. They bought homes with property that needs serious upkeep. They bought homes with stairs and other features not conducive to limited mobility. They bought homes not close to a hospital and/or without good healthcare options. They bought homes far from relatives and close friends willing to lend them a hand when they are temporarily or permanently disabled.

Folks, you aren't going to be the same person when you are 75 as when you are 60. And statistic say that most of you will live even longer than that. People who are 80 have about the same car accident rate as newly licensed teenagers. My 88-year old mother has 11, count 'em, 11 doctors, most of whom she sees regularly. And that's not counting her dentist, eyeglass provider, or hearing-aid specialist. Have you accounted for how you will get groceries, clean your house, take care of the yard, do laundry, even take out the garbage when you break a hip or have a knee replacement? Because that, or something quite similar, will probably happen to you not long after you buy your retirement home.

I don't want to sound like Debbie Downer, but please be realistic when you are choosing your retirement place. Or it will just be the first of several retirement places for you. And if you think it will be a pain in the butt to move when you are 65, imagine how hard it will be when you are 85. Or better yet, imagine who you are going to get to do the moving for you.
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Old 02-01-2015, 03:36 PM
 
1,831 posts, read 2,140,736 times
Reputation: 2602
I live in Florida within easy reach of an global airport, an interstate, walking distance of the ocean and my house is mortgage free and I am happy. Yes the heat of the summer is at times an issue but then the severe cold and snow of some northern regions would also be an issue.
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Old 02-01-2015, 03:56 PM
 
28,276 posts, read 39,940,610 times
Reputation: 36792
The people who bought our house moved from California to West Des Moines, IA. We have no idea why.

We're in Las Vegas now. Yup!!
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Old 02-01-2015, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,981 posts, read 3,470,444 times
Reputation: 10514
That's why I'm looking into senior HUD housing. It's just the state now. I'll stay in Minnesota for the year & visit the places I'm targeting & make a decision then.
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Old 02-01-2015, 04:16 PM
 
4,490 posts, read 4,752,310 times
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jukesgrrl...get all your points.. All food for thought and practical which is very important as we age.

I have lived mainly in apts. all my life and at 61 I really want some yard to garden in. Not big, just enough to do what I want. I'm over apt living. So, if I can find something small, house and yard, I will move and try to stay as long as possible...or maybe just "croak in place".
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Old 02-01-2015, 06:07 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,889 posts, read 18,900,996 times
Reputation: 33808
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
One thing never ceases to amaze me when people speak of ideal places in which to retire. Most people seem to assume that they will spend their retirement in the same state of physical and mental health that they have right at this moment. I take care of an elder in my home. I see all of her relatives and friends. Most of them put themselves somewhere they thought was idyllic when they retired in their sixties. Yet in ten or twenty years, they are now facing having to move YET AGAIN. Why?

They chose a place not at all attuned to the needs of people whose abilities are waning. They bought homes in places where one cannot function without driving a car. They bought homes with property that needs serious upkeep. They bought homes with stairs and other features not conducive to limited mobility. They bought homes not close to a hospital and/or without good healthcare options. They bought homes far from relatives and close friends willing to lend them a hand when they are temporarily or permanently disabled.

Folks, you aren't going to be the same person when you are 75 as when you are 60. And statistic say that most of you will live even longer than that. People who are 80 have about the same car accident rate as newly licensed teenagers. My 88-year old mother has 11, count 'em, 11 doctors, most of whom she sees regularly. And that's not counting her dentist, eyeglass provider, or hearing-aid specialist. Have you accounted for how you will get groceries, clean your house, take care of the yard, do laundry, even take out the garbage when you break a hip or have a knee replacement? Because that, or something quite similar, will probably happen to you not long after you buy your retirement home.

I don't want to sound like Debbie Downer, but please be realistic when you are choosing your retirement place. Or it will just be the first of several retirement places for you. And if you think it will be a pain in the butt to move when you are 65, imagine how hard it will be when you are 85. Or better yet, imagine who you are going to get to do the moving for you.
That's so true. At 65 I wasn't ready for a senior apartment but I sure was done with house and yard. At least I realized I couldn't keep up that pace indefinitely. A tiny senior apartment drove me practically nuts so I am renting a tiny four room house all one one floor and I especially appreciate the first floor laundry room. I appreciate the tiny yard, about big enough for three tomato plants and some beets and several types of perennials. I appreciate that the beach is just a few steps away.

But now I think we have even outgrown this little place. It isn't a good idea to be this isolated out in a somewhat remote beach area, especially in winter. Even though we travel, we still get stuck out here for part of the winter and you do start to wonder what would happen if one of us had an accident, even something like falling on the ice. Anything could happen--there are no friends or family nearby. I'm sure there are some hardy souls who could survive on their own in the wild and in the coldest of winters but they are few and far between--and, they are not us!

So now we are looking at relocating to the south and being near family at the same time. Also, we finally are ready for a senior type apartment as long as it has a porch or patio to grow a few flowers and vegetables, it needs to have a dishwasher and a washer and dryer and it needs to have transportation available just in case. Just in case? Well, I should probably say Sooner or Later. Whether we like it or not. You have to get real. Somehow you have to get real and you have to adjust.
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Old 02-01-2015, 06:21 PM
 
4,447 posts, read 2,623,195 times
Reputation: 10380
We live in the SOuthern Tier of Upstate NY currently. WHY?
Weather:
We DO have winter and snow. Decent snow removal rates.
BUt
: we don't live so close to the ocean that it is "reclaiming" our property
:we don't get many ice storms damaging power lines and such
:we don't really get tornados of mass destruction
:we don't get the brunt of hurricanes or tsunamis {sometimes backlash flooding but not bad}
:We don't get earthquakes of mass destruction
:we don't get sink holes
:we don't suffer in summer heat
:we don't have a volcano erupting spewing and contaminating the air with "vog"
: we DO get some flooding, lately the river has given us a 100 year or 500 year problem, BUT, we live high and dry. ANd perhaps for the next 100 years no flooding?

Economy/COL:lacks, but is liveable and affordable compared to other areas in the USA.
Housing: reasonable to rent, Senior housing {based on % of income} is plentifull and reasonable. Ownership is reasonable with homes of all price levels from $40k-60K "average" low end 2-3 brs8--Sqft-1300sqft, to $125k-$150k for "average" high end 3 or 4+ Brs 1200sqft-1800sqft.
Transportation: there is an extensive bus system in most counties, but lacking in a few.
Shopping: what do you want to buy? We have most major chains and have 2 Walmarts and a Sams Club. WHat you can't buy here, nowadays, you can order online.
Education: should you decide to go/go back, there is a university and a community college here.
Land: there is plenty and lots of farms too for "picutresque countryside", or for building your "dream home"
Services: again, what do you wnat? we have about everythign including a SS office, employment center, State offices, COutny offices, etc.
Security: State, local, city/town police departments readily available with enhanced 911, good county jail, and strong State prison {nearby}. Lower crime rate. Safe to walk most streets at night, very few "sketchy" and no slum/really bad neighborhoods. You can park your car streetside, and it will still be there, and whole, the next morning.
Healthcare: SEVERAL hospitals, almost all specializations, if not, near to upstate/downstate {NYC} centers if not. Nursing homes, Assisted Living centers etc.
Other: Senior services. Low incomer services. Senior centers.
What more could you want {besides year round sunshine? }
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Old 02-01-2015, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Salem,Oregon
306 posts, read 338,280 times
Reputation: 853
Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
jukesgrrl...get all your points.. All food for thought and practical which is very important as we age.

I have lived mainly in apts. all my life and at 61 I really want some yard to garden in. Not big, just enough to do what I want. I'm over apt living. So, if I can find something small, house and yard, I will move and try to stay as long as possible...or maybe just "croak in place".
I am 59, still have a few years to work but I too, had been in apartments all my life. I got really tired of it so 2 years ago this June, I bought a 1996 single wide in a 55+ mobile home park. I have a small yard and garden and my 2 cats are pet fee/rent free. It is a basic park, no perks, but the space rent is cheap, the bus stops across the street and most everything I need is walking distance. I still drive most places but am looking forward to 60 (never thought I'd be saying that ) as the bus pass is 1/2 then. I feel safe here, it's quiet and so far I have been very happy with the decision, I plan on this being where I spend the rest of my life.
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Old 02-01-2015, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,981 posts, read 3,470,444 times
Reputation: 10514
Oh rats, now I have to put Salem, Oregon on my list. Maybe I can do a 2 for1 & check out Knoxville & Salem at the same time. A lot of driving tho.
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Old 02-01-2015, 07:05 PM
 
4,349 posts, read 6,066,011 times
Reputation: 10458
We live on Cape Cod and love it. We gave Florida a 5-year go after an early retirement but Massachusetts was where we belonged so we moved back. Our home is paid for and we've got friends we enjoy and family (some of which we enjoy) who live nearby. This said, I'm posting this from Florida. We got out of Dodge just before the snow. If we could swing it, we'd own two homes, but for now we're happily renting in FL.
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