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Old 02-02-2015, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,751,136 times
Reputation: 32309

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Quote:
Originally Posted by popcorn247 View Post
How ironic that you should bring this topic up. Anyone remember the date August 24, 1992? Hurricane Andrew. I did lose nearly everything in that storm. I had to live with friends for six months until I found a place to live. Thousands of people were affected . All the street signs, traffic lights, concrete light poles, power poles were down. It was at least two YEARS before things seemed to be getting back to normal. The aftermath of the storm was worse than the storm itself! Contractors ripping off people, weeks and months without electricity in the worst hit areas. I was living in Leisure City, just north of Homestead. I totally lost my home. Six months later, I was able to move into a sturdy, home that was fully repaired. The area looked like a war zone. Helicopters flying supplies in for weeks, dusk to dawn curfew, speed limit of 20 mph due to no traffic lights or stop signs. I was living in the middle of a natural disaster. Where I worked was horribly affected and we spent months on the cleanup.

Everyone freaks out about tornadoes, but hurricanes affect so many more people! I am sure that I suffer from ptsd due to that storm. The stress when there is a storm out in the Atlantic or the Gulf and the Hurricane Center says it is heading our way . In 2005, my area was hit by FOUR storms: D-storm (I forget the name), Katrina, Rita and Wilma. I hate them!!!!! I hate putting up storm shutters, I hate paying outrageous homeowners' insurance ($4,550.00 this year), I hate living in a third world-feeling area where my ethnicity (white, American) is 15% of the population in Miami-Dade County. To be honest, I would much rather live in tornado land then hurricane-prone areas. I will be sure to choose a place that is not in a flood-prone area.
I'm sorry about what you went through - sounds like a protracted nightmare. I drove through the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans about six months after Katrina and it still looked like an abandoned war zone.

As bad as earthquake damage can be in a major quake, it seems to me the damage from a major hurricane is more widespread and takes longer for a return to normal. Not one single earthquake in Southern California in the entire 20th century destroyed as many homes or took nearly as long to recover from as what you are describing for Hurricane Andrew. In Northern California, the San Francisco quake (1906 ?) may approach that level of destruction because of the out-of-control fires, I'm not sure.

Of course we have advance knowledge of hurricanes, but not of earthquakes. A person can go from sleeping comfortably to stark terror in a couple of seconds. I will never forget the Northridge quake of 1994, although I did not suffer any damage at the apartment where I was living at the time. Some acquaintances had to move out of their apartments, which were red-tagged by building inspectors, and others went a week or two before electricity was restored. My power came back in seven or eight hours.

Of course
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Old 02-02-2015, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,789 posts, read 4,846,494 times
Reputation: 19489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
"Pesky thunderstorms.?" Really? We all certainly have different tastes in weather and locations. I really missed summer thunderstorms and purposely so0ught a retirement location where I would have them again. Not long after we moved we got a bunch of them and I still liked them, even after a lightening bolt struck our driveway about 30 feet in front of me and blew me the length of the garage in which I'd been watching it while standing just inside the open door.
I really don't hate thunderstorms. I love the negative ions in the air when it's storming. It makes me feel invigorated and the temperatures drop and it feels wonderful. They can ruin an outdoor event though, and we have had a few dangerous close calls. The OP mentioned that she was tired of T-storms so, in an attempt at full disclosure, I felt that I should mention that we have them here for a few months of the year. For us, the biggest problem with thunder is that it makes my dogs so frightened that they pace and drool and hide in the bathroom!
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Old 02-02-2015, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Over yonder a piece
3,911 posts, read 4,654,477 times
Reputation: 6247
Quote:
Originally Posted by popcorn247 View Post
I am interested in hiking, rocks, animals, visiting natural areas, history, museums, hunting mushrooms, birding, visiting historical sites, attending festivals, county fairs, reading and gardening and fishing! I like walking barefoot on soft grass, picking flowers from my own garden to bring into the house and I enjoy cooking.
Asheville, NC is there you need to go.
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Old 02-02-2015, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,336,499 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxyhi View Post
We live in the SOuthern Tier of Upstate NY currently. WHY?
Weather:
We DO have winter and snow. Decent snow removal rates.
BUt
: we don't live so close to the ocean that it is "reclaiming" our property
:we don't get many ice storms damaging power lines and such
:we don't really get tornados of mass destruction
:we don't get the brunt of hurricanes or tsunamis {sometimes backlash flooding but not bad}
:We don't get earthquakes of mass destruction
:we don't get sink holes
:we don't suffer in summer heat
:we don't have a volcano erupting spewing and contaminating the air with "vog"
: we DO get some flooding, lately the river has given us a 100 year or 500 year problem, BUT, we live high and dry. ANd perhaps for the next 100 years no flooding?

Economy/COL:lacks, but is liveable and affordable compared to other areas in the USA.
Housing: reasonable to rent, Senior housing {based on % of income} is plentifull and reasonable. Ownership is reasonable with homes of all price levels from $40k-60K "average" low end 2-3 brs8--Sqft-1300sqft, to $125k-$150k for "average" high end 3 or 4+ Brs 1200sqft-1800sqft.
Transportation: there is an extensive bus system in most counties, but lacking in a few.
Shopping: what do you want to buy? We have most major chains and have 2 Walmarts and a Sams Club. WHat you can't buy here, nowadays, you can order online.
Education: should you decide to go/go back, there is a university and a community college here.
Land: there is plenty and lots of farms too for "picutresque countryside", or for building your "dream home"
Services: again, what do you wnat? we have about everythign including a SS office, employment center, State offices, COutny offices, etc.
Security: State, local, city/town police departments readily available with enhanced 911, good county jail, and strong State prison {nearby}. Lower crime rate. Safe to walk most streets at night, very few "sketchy" and no slum/really bad neighborhoods. You can park your car streetside, and it will still be there, and whole, the next morning.
Healthcare: SEVERAL hospitals, almost all specializations, if not, near to upstate/downstate {NYC} centers if not. Nursing homes, Assisted Living centers etc.
Other: Senior services. Low incomer services. Senior centers.
What more could you want {besides year round sunshine? }
I live at the western end of the Southern Tier in Jamestown, NY, and I concur with your thoughts.

The thing that I like best about living in this part of the country is the people. The idea of lending a help hand to anybody, even a stranger, remains a part of the way of life here. Hit a deer on the interstate (I-86), and people will not only stop to see that you're all right, but also wait with you for the SP and the tow truck to show up -- and the tow driver will give you and your dog a ride home. That's the kind of place this is.

When I moved here in 1998 for a job, I did NOT know a soul here. Now I have a legion of good friends, and I'm not a particularly outgoing person. People seem to be very accepting of newcomers, and there's also a very strong live and let live attitude here, so if you're not the church going type or your life-style might not meet with the accepted norms of other rural/small town areas, it's not an issue in/around Jamestown.

People here are not just laid back, but also very well mannered. Four cars arriving at a four way stop sign at about the same time can end up causing what amounts to a traffic jam here because everybody waves everybody else on and nobody will go first!
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Old 02-02-2015, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,789 posts, read 4,846,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Girl View Post
Asheville, NC is there you need to go.
I was going to say the same about the Knoxville area. All of what she likes and more.
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Old 02-02-2015, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,336,499 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by popcorn247 View Post
I am interested in hiking, rocks, animals, visiting natural areas, history, museums, hunting mushrooms, birding, visiting historical sites, attending festivals, county fairs, reading and gardening and fishing! I like walking barefoot on soft grass, picking flowers from my own garden to bring into the house and I enjoy cooking.
Since you said you'd like to move to the Midwest, you might consider Iowa City, IA, home of the University of Iowa. There's a major wildlife management area just to the north and there's also Coralville Lake for recreation. The area does not look like the stereotypical Iowa landscape of corn and soybean fields as far as the eye can see. You're less than 2 hours from Des Moines, the state capital, as well.
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Old 02-02-2015, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,124 posts, read 23,000,049 times
Reputation: 35318
Quote:
Originally Posted by meo92953 View Post
So what is the average rent? Are there senior income based apartments? The place sounds wonderful but could a person on a fixed income afford to live there?
Yes, that's what I live in. I'm on a very low fixed income (SSI). Here's the housing website:

Housing Authority

Quote:
Originally Posted by eok View Post
Older people are more likely to need doctors. Smaller town doctors tend to be less competent than big city doctors. And if you get too old to drive, it's hard to take a bus in a smaller town. So most older people are better off moving to a moderately big city, if they can afford it. Louisville, KY, is about optimum size, and has a relatively low cost of living.
See, here I disagree with you. Just because a doctor wants to live in a small town, doesn't make him/her a bad doctor. And depending on how small the town is, there are still buses and even special ones just for seniors. I live in a town of about 7500 people, and there is bus service and special transport for seniors here.

I did forget to mention one little thing about Crescent City - it's in a tsunami zone LOL! I live close to the water, so i would have to evactuate. But, the tsunami "danger" zone is basically just the downtown area. I would have to just go up the street a few blocks to the "safe" zone of an elementary school. There are huge sirens that would warn people to evacuate, if one was coming.

I have my emergency backpack by the door in case it happens, with my important papers, dog stuff, clothing, etc., etc., which I can grab on my way out the door if it ever happens. I've got my plan, grab the laptop, grab the dog, grab the backpack and off we go!
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Old 02-02-2015, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,988,950 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
One thing never ceases to amaze me when people speak of ideal places in which to retire. Most people seem to assume that they will spend their retirement in the same state of physical and mental health that they have right at this moment. I take care of an elder in my home. I see all of her relatives and friends. Most of them put themselves somewhere they thought was idyllic when they retired in their sixties. Yet in ten or twenty years, they are now facing having to move YET AGAIN. Why?

They chose a place not at all attuned to the needs of people whose abilities are waning. They bought homes in places where one cannot function without driving a car. They bought homes with property that needs serious upkeep. They bought homes with stairs and other features not conducive to limited mobility. They bought homes not close to a hospital and/or without good healthcare options. They bought homes far from relatives and close friends willing to lend them a hand when they are temporarily or permanently disabled.

Folks, you aren't going to be the same person when you are 75 as when you are 60. And statistic say that most of you will live even longer than that. People who are 80 have about the same car accident rate as newly licensed teenagers. My 88-year old mother has 11, count 'em, 11 doctors, most of whom she sees regularly. And that's not counting her dentist, eyeglass provider, or hearing-aid specialist. Have you accounted for how you will get groceries, clean your house, take care of the yard, do laundry, even take out the garbage when you break a hip or have a knee replacement? Because that, or something quite similar, will probably happen to you not long after you buy your retirement home.

I don't want to sound like Debbie Downer, but please be realistic when you are choosing your retirement place. Or it will just be the first of several retirement places for you. And if you think it will be a pain in the butt to move when you are 65, imagine how hard it will be when you are 85. Or better yet, imagine who you are going to get to do the moving for you.
This is one of the best posts ever (along with LauraC's) on moving in retirement. It echos all my own feelings, from both experience and close observation of others. I recently went through all my contacts' addresses to update them and was shocked at the number friends/family who are (1) really aged in really inappropriate-type homes for their age, (2) in nursing homes earlier than I'd imagined, (3) died. I remember these folks as they were in their 50s and 60s. The years have melted away. I feel that there's one more place for us before we either croak or go into some kind of facility, and that's why I'm still looking at options. The next place, if we do move, will be for 8090 year-olds.
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Old 02-02-2015, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,139 posts, read 45,675,592 times
Reputation: 61835
Savannah GA area. We moved for reasons which are no longer valid, but we love skipping the northern winters, and have acclimated pretty well to the summer heat. There is always something to see or do here, and the beach is a half hour away.

The only thing that we miss is our friends up north. We make friends easily and were very social before we moved, yet have made no new friends here. The friends are not staying put anyway, but are spread far and wide. One good thing about my climate is folks tend to come see me for visits.

If we had wound up in the Carolinas, I would have liked that too.
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Old 02-02-2015, 12:31 PM
 
3,559 posts, read 4,600,939 times
Reputation: 4657
I have not made the move yet, but am transitioning to Boise, in all likelihood.

Low crime.
Four seasons that are not extreme.
Great health care.
Kind residents.
Hip-ish urban center.
Lots to do outdoors if you are active.
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