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Old 02-06-2015, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Near the In-n-Out
30 posts, read 27,838 times
Reputation: 53

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Griz View Post
........In two months I'll be 83.....been retired for almost 22 years, right here in this home I built 35 years ago, 11 miles from a town of almost 5000, with a highly rated Hospital, great Vet Hospital (naturally I've got a dog), and all the other necessities to live a normal lifestyle on a piece of property that my late wife and I looked "long & hard" for. I started driving an automobile at age 14 and will continue to drive until I can't pass the renewal test. At present I have "under-my-belt" almost 2 million miles in ALL types of weather, 75% of which has been in the northern states and mountainous country, so driving the 11 miles into town is not a problem.....Having a job that required extensive travel for almost 40 years, has conditioned me to feel very comfortable driving a car under most all conditions and distances.
The reason(s) I will stay where I am for the rest of my retirement include the following:
No possibility of noisy neighbors or traffic noises, & others conditions that would destroy the "peace & quite & soloitude of my present location.
The ability to put the electronic training collar on my dog and let him outside to run free on my 14 acres for about 1/2 hr, twice a day.
The pleasure of looking out any window in my house any day and having a 90% chance of seeing deer, a 75% chance (in the fall & spring) of seeing elk; again in the spring and fall, a 100% chance of seeing wild turkeys; almost every day I can look up in the sky and see two or more Bald Eagles flying overhead in circles; and everyday I can see many, many chimpmunks, pine squirrels, marmots, and at least 30 or 35 different specie of birds......And on rare occasions, an occasional fox, coyote, black bear or badger will decide to "come visit."......In addition having a 40 foot wide year round stream as one of my boundries is a real joy:....the sound in the months when the windows are open is great, the occasional Brown Trout that I catch is a real-plus, and the amount of wildlife, birds and waterfowl that come to drink are a great joy to watch.

So continuing to live where I can't see a neighbor (there is one fine neighbor located 1/4 mile through the woods), drive 11 miles into town, and have the privacy that I feel I deserve and enjoy, .....are worth what some folks might consider "inconviences"!......To live in town "would probably kill me within a year!!

Hopfully the Cell phone I carry and the Medical Alert "Thingy" on my belt and the revolver on my hip will prove helpful if some unfortunate situation arises.

Where else could I live out my retirement years (with the life-style and conditions and desires I have) and not drive my self "nuts" with the frustrations associated with "town-Living?.

^^That sounds absolutely beautiful!!!^^


That's why my DH and I are retiring to the Reno area. We've been in So Cal our entire lives and our spirits are calling us back to nature. I used to have a horse when I was growing up but every couple of years the stables where I boarded would get dozed over and commercial buildings put in their place.

There are so many people here in So Cal now. Traffic is off the charts all times of the day and night. The gangs have been slowly creeping into our once quiet little neighborhood.

We recently watched a video of a kid riding his dirt bike on the Genoa trail with Lake Tahoe in the background. All of a sudden tears started streaming down my face. (We both ride.) I literally could not stop crying. Same thing with a video of wild Mustangs right outside of Reno. I'm getting a little choked up just thinking about it now. My soul and spirit were basically yelling at me as loud as they could.

Well, message heard loud and clear! After that, any doubts I had about us retiring and moving to Reno are fading. I'm sure I'll still have anxiety here and there, it's a big move for us, but I told my husband to just play the videos and I'll be fine!
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:53 PM
 
4,481 posts, read 4,742,235 times
Reputation: 9940
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
NEG, you're in such a good location (except for the winter)--I think you should just get a cheaper house and use the extra money to go somewhere warm in winter. There. Problem Solved. <joke>

dh and I have very limited income due to his money being stolen by a lawyer. We had encouraging news last week but it still could take years. Our options are very limited but at age 70 I am over having a house--very much over that phase of my life, at last. I could be happy in an apartment complex, I think, of older people--no screaming kids. We don't have any option of a ccrc or anything like that.

I wouldn't want to snowbird it, I know that much having seen my parents and older relatives going back and forth. Too much stress with two homes to worry about. But I think I would like to move to a climate without WINTERS like Virginia--I was there for the month of Jan. and that is NOT winter. It can snow a little bit but that is NOT winter as I know it.

So for now it is the climate and being able to go outside. Of course in Virginia they are stuck inside all summer just as we are stuck inside all winter. BUT the difference is that they can live in a/c and get to their a/c car and get to an a/c store (or a/c anything.) Whereas here, in winter, we really are stuck. You can't even get your car out and can hardly drive, and everything gets cancelled due to storms. Summers there would be unpleasant but it can't be as unpleasant (and expensive) as winter here. It's a trade off but it seems like Virginia with its more moderate winters would win by a nose.


I hardly think New England is the panacea of lovely cool summers. I lived in Vermont, spent time in Maine and New Hampshire during summers and they can be pretty brutal as far as heat and humidity. Of course, not like the south, VA., but it still has it's periods. I have lived in the DC area, built on a swamp, and hate the heat and humidity but never would I go north again and deal with winters in New England.
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Old 02-06-2015, 04:00 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,838 posts, read 18,855,957 times
Reputation: 33746
Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
I hardly think New England is the panacea of lovely cool summers. I lived in Vermont, spent time in Maine and New Hampshire during summers and they can be pretty brutal as far as heat and humidity. Of course, not like the south, VA., but it still has it's periods. I have lived in the DC area, built on a swamp, and hate the heat and humidity but never would I go north again and deal with winters in New England.
The "good" months in New England are May, September, and October. It's sweltering and muggy during the summer, although that's not as horrible as it used to be for me now that I live at the beach. Inland it's awful.

To get an idea of the Virginia climate, my sister in VA says their summer climate is like FIVE New England Julys instead of just one. (Did she really say FIVE? Maybe she said TWO.)
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Old 02-06-2015, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,975,704 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
The "good" months in New England are May, September, and October. It's sweltering and muggy during the summer, although that's not as horrible as it used to be for me now that I live at the beach. Inland it's awful.

To get an idea of the Virginia climate, my sister in VA says their summer climate is like FIVE New England Julys instead of just one. (Did she really say FIVE? Maybe she said TWO.)
Well, we can spar a bit on this. Humid and hot do not always go hand in hand in summer in New England. There are many "humid" days with a pleasant breeze in the high 70s and 80s that are just nice. We do usually get one "horrible" week of high heat+humidity during which we must turn on the central ac. Rest of the summer we don't put it on; ceiling fans are great along with cross breezes from open windows.

Now if you want to talk horrid, we toured the South several times in the summer. I almost passed out walking a college campus in Radford, VA in June. We landed in Greenville, SC on that trip, checking out Spartanburg and Landrum, and had to go into an air conditioned museum for an entire afternoon, just to get off the streets. Were we ever happy to get back home to New England where you can catch a breeze.

DH, never bothered by anything, buckled under in the oven heat in Orlando, FL in late May. DC is unbearable to us in summer. So I would not single out New England; humidity is a fact of life east of the Mississippi. We've also lived in Missouri twice; heh-heh.

OTOH, I've been in Squaw Valley, CA in summer where you can't walk 50 feet without chugging water. That's a dry heat extreme to contend with. A friend in Chico, CA reports temps over 100 for days.

I'm not sure where perfect weather is year-round, but I'm sure it's been well discovered.
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Old 02-06-2015, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,295 posts, read 3,341,557 times
Reputation: 4829
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsy girl View Post
it is all about priorities, practicalities, and choosing those things we value more over those we value less. i can understand Montana Griz's desire to remain independent in the area he loves with the lifestyle he values, even though these would not be my priorities over safety, convenience, proximity to medical care etc. i personally feel that, although i may not love being so close to neighbors and not having nature and wildlife in my backyard, so to speak, i don't have the luxury now of choosing those things over those i feel i need to value at least as much .

i have never been what i term, for lack of something better, a "pioneer woman". i like amenities, some cultural offerings , convenience, and although i still enjoy nature, privacy, and having some space apart from other people, i feel i have to consider other needs as well. i also see a need for some sense of community, some social insulation, whether it is organic or invented; that is more difficult in a remote setting.

responses on this board confirm the many differences among us. it is important to know oneself and the life in which we feel we can function as we age; but it seems that all choices involve the loss of other possibilities.

catsy girl
..

My opinion of the above Quote by catsy girl:
Written by an intelligent, open-minded person who realizes that the enviroment in which we lived during our "formative-years"...... (IMHO, approx age five to 20) and beyond...... can have a significant impact on Where and How we want to live during retirement.
In my case, the only time I lived in a city or town, was the 1st 5 years of married life. I was raised with a love of the outdoors and in effect, "grew up from the age of 10 with a fishing rod in one hand and a rfile or shotgun in the other".
Having lost my father (to an early death) before the age of 15, I developed into an independent and self sufficient adult at an early age. After working my way through college and immediately after graduation getting married (which lasted more than 51 years/lost her to cancer), I then began a 40 yr career in the Industrial Field that required that I travel extensively to remote Field Job Sites in The Rocky Mountain states of the western U.S., (thus exposing me to "the outdoors and nature" on a regular basis..............AND also research and 'check-out' many, many potential-retirement cities and various areas from AZ to CO to WA and CA>
During my college years, I survived a "double-fatality" auto accident (as a passenger) that killed the two people seated on my left and resulted in my living with the after effects of 15 major fractures (body cast/3 months; 4 months in Hosp; over 150 Physical Therapy sessions and many other medical facts too numerous to mention.)...Thus I realize how short life can be and firmly believe nothing is guaranteed so...........CARPE DIEM!!!
Please understand, I am not some "crotchy, un-social old fogey" living alone as a widowed hermit. On the contrary, I go into town 3 or 4 times per week to have coffee with friends or have lunch or dinner at one of the many (approx 50) restaurants in the beautiful Bitterroot Valley that has a population of approx 40,000.... I also periodicly attend various theather productions, art shows, U of MT athletic events, etc,etc.
Yes, I fully realize how lucky and fortunate I am..............the planning and effort put forth in my younger years have proved "anything worth-while....does not come easy!

Last edited by Montana Griz; 02-06-2015 at 05:19 PM..
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Old 02-06-2015, 05:02 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,165,475 times
Reputation: 22373
Honestly, all across NC there are small (under 50K) towns that have neighborhoods surrounded by amenities. That is why people are moving to small towns in NC to retire!

You don't have to go to a CCRC or a 55+ to live in a lovely neighborhood with sidewalks, transportation if you need it (you may have to schedule it ahead of time, but . . . that's still a plan!), docs, pharmacies, groceries, retail, restaurants, etc all within 2 miles.

I am moving back "home" and moving to within a matter of blocks from the same places I chose to live in the past. There is only one section of town I would want to live in b/c it is the upscale convenient section.

My Alma Mater is only 1/2 mile from my new residence.

We like boating and fishing and one of the nicest lakes in NC will be exactly 7 minutes from my door (I timed it, lol).

But you would miss all that if someone "in the know" didn't point it out should you be driving through town.

When I moved out of state, I looked for that same configuration - everything I needed, including big box stores, within 2-3 miles. And I found it! I could (and did) walk to the local grocery store, and everything I needed was within blocks - with the big box stores and the Mall and all that retail less than 3 miles away.

Since moving back to NC, I am in Charlotte and I have the same configuration. I could stay right here and have all the amenities within less than a mile for most things and 2 1/2 for the rest (hospital, big box stores and 2 malls). We need to leave this house and 1/2 acre of land that we can no longer manage, or we would retire in place.

We found the same configurations in Texas, Virginia, SC, Missouri, KS, Florida, GA . . . even California, lol . . . there are nice towns all over this country that have 4 seasons, moderate (if not low) taxes and housing. It just depends on what you are looking for as to what you will see. And locals are the ones to tell you where the most convenient sections of town are located.

The thing is . . . you probably are not going to know the names of these towns. And they may not seem to "sparkle" on the surface. And some of their "hidden jewels" may be so well hidden that they are not well publicized.

For example, in my former home, we have one of the first (if not the first) art museums in the country dedicated solely to American artists. There is also one of the largest pottery/ceramic arts communities in that town . . . as well as a wonderful symphony.

But if you just drove into town and looked around, you would probably miss all that and you would certainly not know to go to the NW quadrant for the "sweet spot" where I have always chosen to live. You would probably pass it by.

You would, instead, see some empty industrial buildings and railroad tracks on the outskirts of town, some potholes in roads, some closed businesses . . . and think . . . oh my. This looks like a sad little town.

That sad little town even has a minor baseball team and stadium, several country clubs, an amazing community theatre, thriving arts community, and a critically acclaimed choral society. It's a fun place to live!

And there are towns like this all over the country! Towns with cute little bistros and coffee shops (2 within a few blocks of my new residence) . . . taverns/pubs, entrepreneurs, boutique shops . . . there are amazing people doing exciting things all over this country.

But you have to find them for yourself - lots of research! And even if you go to visit, you may not recognize the potential by just driving through town.

PS> You mentioned heat/humidity. I grew up in heat and humidity, so I don't think that much about having to deal with it. The way we dealt with it is the way I still deal with it - head to the mountains! lol And if not that, I carry a spray mister with me, mist my neck, face . . . wear Charleston hats, sunglasses, linen clothing . . . and I make it through. And yes, we do have breezes. That is what those back porches/decks/verandas are for!
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Old 02-06-2015, 06:07 PM
 
674 posts, read 838,424 times
Reputation: 1188
Yes, I do live in an area that is walkable to the grocery store and various other stores. I think it's 1.5 miles to be exact. 5 miles to the airport. 10 miles to the hospital and my dr is 2 miles door to door. Many walking trails, beach is about 2 miles away. Low cost of living. Very happy here.
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Old 02-06-2015, 07:27 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,838 posts, read 18,855,957 times
Reputation: 33746
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokensky View Post
Honestly, all across NC there are small (under 50K) towns that have neighborhoods surrounded by amenities. That is why people are moving to small towns in NC to retire!

You don't have to go to a CCRC or a 55+ to live in a lovely neighborhood with sidewalks, transportation if you need it (you may have to schedule it ahead of time, but . . . that's still a plan!), docs, pharmacies, groceries, retail, restaurants, etc all within 2 miles.

I am moving back "home" and moving to within a matter of blocks from the same places I chose to live in the past. There is only one section of town I would want to live in b/c it is the upscale convenient section.

My Alma Mater is only 1/2 mile from my new residence.

We like boating and fishing and one of the nicest lakes in NC will be exactly 7 minutes from my door (I timed it, lol).

But you would miss all that if someone "in the know" didn't point it out should you be driving through town.

When I moved out of state, I looked for that same configuration - everything I needed, including big box stores, within 2-3 miles. And I found it! I could (and did) walk to the local grocery store, and everything I needed was within blocks - with the big box stores and the Mall and all that retail less than 3 miles away.

Since moving back to NC, I am in Charlotte and I have the same configuration. I could stay right here and have all the amenities within less than a mile for most things and 2 1/2 for the rest (hospital, big box stores and 2 malls). We need to leave this house and 1/2 acre of land that we can no longer manage, or we would retire in place.

We found the same configurations in Texas, Virginia, SC, Missouri, KS, Florida, GA . . . even California, lol . . . there are nice towns all over this country that have 4 seasons, moderate (if not low) taxes and housing. It just depends on what you are looking for as to what you will see. And locals are the ones to tell you where the most convenient sections of town are located.

The thing is . . . you probably are not going to know the names of these towns. And they may not seem to "sparkle" on the surface. And some of their "hidden jewels" may be so well hidden that they are not well publicized.

For example, in my former home, we have one of the first (if not the first) art museums in the country dedicated solely to American artists. There is also one of the largest pottery/ceramic arts communities in that town . . . as well as a wonderful symphony.

But if you just drove into town and looked around, you would probably miss all that and you would certainly not know to go to the NW quadrant for the "sweet spot" where I have always chosen to live. You would probably pass it by.

You would, instead, see some empty industrial buildings and railroad tracks on the outskirts of town, some potholes in roads, some closed businesses . . . and think . . . oh my. This looks like a sad little town.

That sad little town even has a minor baseball team and stadium, several country clubs, an amazing community theatre, thriving arts community, and a critically acclaimed choral society. It's a fun place to live!

And there are towns like this all over the country! Towns with cute little bistros and coffee shops (2 within a few blocks of my new residence) . . . taverns/pubs, entrepreneurs, boutique shops . . . there are amazing people doing exciting things all over this country.

But you have to find them for yourself - lots of research! And even if you go to visit, you may not recognize the potential by just driving through town.

PS> You mentioned heat/humidity. I grew up in heat and humidity, so I don't think that much about having to deal with it. The way we dealt with it is the way I still deal with it - head to the mountains! lol And if not that, I carry a spray mister with me, mist my neck, face . . . wear Charleston hats, sunglasses, linen clothing . . . and I make it through. And yes, we do have breezes. That is what those back porches/decks/verandas are for!
I love this post because I am strongly considering Virginia or maybe even eastern NC for a major move. It's a matter of finding the right town and an affordable place. Weather? I have no interest in summer in Florida--been there in August and I never want to experience that ever again.

I've been in Virginia Beach in the summer too for a few days to see my sister. The heat and humidity were kind of overwhelming but I can feel that way in the summer in Mass too-- not quite as much and it wouldn't be for the entire summer. The worst months here are July and August; in Virginia Beach I think the worst starts in June and ends sometime in September.

On our trip last month we visited Yorktown, which isn't too far north of VA Beach where my sister lives, and it looked like and felt like New England. Small town feel, rural, trees, hills, and a lot of history. We didn't have time to see nearby Williamsburg and other towns but that's where we will probably go exploring. So much to consider but climate is one and so is that feeling of being "home" in a place where you will fit in and will find things to do.
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Old 02-06-2015, 08:11 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,165,475 times
Reputation: 22373
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I love this post because I am strongly considering Virginia or maybe even eastern NC for a major move. It's a matter of finding the right town and an affordable place. Weather? I have no interest in summer in Florida--been there in August and I never want to experience that ever again.

I've been in Virginia Beach in the summer too for a few days to see my sister. The heat and humidity were kind of overwhelming but I can feel that way in the summer in Mass too-- not quite as much and it wouldn't be for the entire summer. The worst months here are July and August; in Virginia Beach I think the worst starts in June and ends sometime in September.

On our trip last month we visited Yorktown, which isn't too far north of VA Beach where my sister lives, and it looked like and felt like New England. Small town feel, rural, trees, hills, and a lot of history. We didn't have time to see nearby Williamsburg and other towns but that's where we will probably go exploring. So much to consider but climate is one and so is that feeling of being "home" in a place where you will fit in and will find things to do.
There are so very many wonderful towns in Virginia, some of them tucked away in enclaves where folks must go to some trouble to discover them!

Unfortunately, since moving back to NC 12 years ago, I haven't spent time in Virginia to the extent I did in years past. I used to spend many weekends a year and sometimes just drive into Virginia for day trips, hunting for antiques and collectibles. I earned money while in college by buying, refinishing and selling antiques, primitives and collectibles and Virginia was such a treasure trove for those items in those days.

I still dream of owning a B&B in a quaint little town in Virginia. I guess I never ventured anywhere that I didn't find something to like.

But without spending much time there in the last decade (only passing-through on the way to DC, usually) I have no way of knowing how much things have changed. I do know that areas where there were once rolling acres of pastureland (such as around Manassas) there are now dense neighborhoods.

Have you checked out such places as Fredericksburg? I haven't been there in 10 years! But I fell in love with that town 35 years ago.

Are you particularly wanting to stay near the coast?

I hope you will get a chance to check out some of the towns hidden away throughout Virginia. Many are at elevations that keep the weather a bit cooler in the summer, too.
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Old 02-06-2015, 08:24 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,577 posts, read 10,920,803 times
Reputation: 19205
I live 20 miles from Cody, Wyoming, a city of 9k plus anothr 15k within twenty-five miles. i can be there in about 25 minutes.

Super Walmart
Albertson's
cheese and assorted goody store including soup and sandwiches
2 health food stores
bakery
perhaps 25 restaurants of which only some of the fast food are chains.
regional hospital and many sawbones of all types
largest museum between Minneapolis and Seattle
movie theater with multiple screens
all of the usual other stuff including scheduled flights to Denver and Salt Lake
no kill humane society

When it's a hundred miles between towns of decent size the towns have far more than any suburb.

Obama carried only 20% of the county vote last time.

On my place I have a large dog park and hiking trails, shooting range, and trout fishing about 1/4 mile past my property line.

Decent houses in town are under 200k. There are several inexpensive trailer parks as well. There's no crime. The temperature reached 64 today; it's still 55.
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