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Old 02-07-2015, 07:44 AM
 
Location: CT
3,461 posts, read 1,859,653 times
Reputation: 4614

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I know this one comes up every now and then, but I am ready to retire in about 2 1/2 years. I've gotten all my finances set up, I know what I need for medical insurance, we pretty much know where we'll be living, we have plans for when we are free of the daily grind. But I need to get through the final years of my career and I feel like I've already disconnected from it and every day I just go in and go through the motions until I walk out for the last time. I have no ambitions for avancement, I am at the point where I don't get much more than COLA for raises, my employer just expects everything to get done and figures I've been around long enough to figure it out with limited supervision. I'm lucky that I have a pretty autonomous job and I am not micromanaged, but without feedback, positive or negative, I feel like I'm just keeping the seat warm.

Did any of you go the same thing? How did you get through your home stretch?
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Old 02-07-2015, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,997,544 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowtired14 View Post
I know this one comes up every now and then, but I am ready to retire in about 2 1/2 years. I've gotten all my finances set up, I know what I need for medical insurance, we pretty much know where we'll be living, we have plans for when we are free of the daily grind. But I need to get through the final years of my career and I feel like I've already disconnected from it and every day I just go in and go through the motions until I walk out for the last time. I have no ambitions for avancement, I am at the point where I don't get much more than COLA for raises, my employer just expects everything to get done and figures I've been around long enough to figure it out with limited supervision. I'm lucky that I have a pretty autonomous job and I am not micromanaged, but without feedback, positive or negative, I feel like I'm just keeping the seat warm.

Did any of you go the same thing? How did you get through your home stretch?
I would suggest lots and lots of diversions. Quarterly trips, weekly treats. Concentrate on the multitude of tasks in downsizing and cutting a whole new style (furniture, decor) and shopping for all that...a monthly plan that keeps you so engaged in the future that you don't even think about the present, just go to work automatically but keep your mind on other things.
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Old 02-07-2015, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,341,108 times
Reputation: 13779
Well, I'm planning on retiring in about 11 months, and every once in a while it hits me that I'm doing a lot of things at work this year (I work in a college, so we're very a very cyclical schedule) that I won't be here to do next year. It's kind of scary and sad at the same time.

Since I love my job and the work that I do, I really don't have issues with "keeping my head in the game" except sometimes when it's cold and snowy outside and the radio turns on at 6 am with a list of school closings (my college hardly ever does).
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:06 AM
 
4,576 posts, read 7,068,792 times
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at 2-1/2 years to go I wouldn't consider you a "short timer" in terms of keeping your head in the game. As I got closer to retirement, I felt that I was getting paid good money and good benefits for my services and that I should continue to provide those services at a high level until the day I didn't work there any more. That's what I was getting paid to do. In fact, I always "acted" interested in what was going on even after I gave my retirement notice. I didn't want to do anything to mess up my retirement....remember a company can let you go at any time if they feel you are not performing up to the standards they expect in your position. I know of examples of people who were let go very close to their retirement or vesting dates. After all, the company does have any idea of when you will be retiring and, believe me, they watch it (and you) very closely. I thought of it this way too...that I could save a heck of a lot more money in the meantime! Not saying it's easy but the fact that I saw the light at the end of the tunnel really helped

Last edited by loveautumn; 02-07-2015 at 10:08 AM.. Reason: add thought
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:20 AM
 
284 posts, read 260,088 times
Reputation: 715
I just asked my husband if I was sleep walking last night and got on the computer, because I absolutely could have written your post to the letter! I too have 2 1/2 years to go and am in your same situation with workload, management, etc. Just ticking off the days. I'm trying to stay in the moment as much as possible, but it sure is hard. Looking forward to reading other's suggestions.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:23 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,514,657 times
Reputation: 29081
I decided to retire earlier that originally planned partially on circumstances and significantly on something Garrison Keillor said during a presentation my wife and I attended. The following work day I gave six month's notice to my employer.

I had risen as high in management as I was likely to, was satisfied with the level I'd attained as it more than met my needs, my work had become less satisfying after 25 years and my wife, who was experiencing some health issues, needed me more than did my employer. I could look forward to a decent pension and lifetime health benefits with no premium, had a 401(k) and enough other money to make a retirement move to another state.

I got through the home stretch and kept my head in the game purely on professionalism and a strong work ethic and decidedly looked forward to the end of my working life which totaled 45 years in all. Knowing it was about to be over kept me motivated to see it through.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:55 AM
 
Location: NC
6,575 posts, read 8,008,745 times
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I had the same feelings once I was on 'the path' to retirement. Maybe everyone does who is not laid off or needs to leave for health reasons.

About a year ahead of the actual date I discovered I could afford to retire. In my case I kept engaged to a certain extent because my project was pretty interesting and still gave me the chance to learn lots of new stuff. On top of that was this sense of mini-elation that I did not need to worry about where the department was going or whether it was making what I considered the best choices. So I had this sense of freedom that I had not had in the few years before. Fortunately or unfortunately, I did not have a plan of what my retirement would look like, just figured I would know it when I saw it. Of course the finance thing was under control or I would not have asked to retire. By not having a picture in my mind of what my retirement would look like it might have helped, because I did not have competing thoughts about watching those waves or hiking that mountain trail. I suggest people not start 'daydreaming' too much until the actual TTFN moment comes.
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Old 02-07-2015, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,707 posts, read 33,724,405 times
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I don't think you can fix what you did, OP. Except for the money part, details-wise, you may have planned your retirement, too early. My head was filled with relocation-related activity the year before I went out so I was able to function on auto-pilot on the job that last year. You've got 2 and a half years to go plus it sounds like you even already have the fun stuff (not just the have-to-do stuff) in your future planned. The problem, as I see it, is you are literally ready to retire now. Most people, when they say they are ready to retire, only mean they are fed up with their job and/or going to work and have looked into whether or not they have the money to do it and maybe scouted some locations if they plan to relocate. Because you were so thorough so early, you only have your job to think about and maybe therein lies your problem.

I researched my relocation to death but I love doing research. I even looked at annual events on the travel and tourism website for the state and then sought out pictures and YouTube and other videos on those events. I looked for webcams in the area. I even went so far as to research restaurants in the new location and look at their menus online and determine which dealership would service my car. I used Mapquest to check out how far things were from where I would be living. I have previously mentioned subscribing to local newspapers for the new location, as well. The stories just led me to research more things. I read up on my soon to be new senators, governor and representative. When I was at work that last year, new things I might research, popped into my head throughout the day. I couldn't wait to get home to check them out. But the point is, I did all that in a one year window, the year before I went out. I was so excited about moving to a new place and a new life that leaving the job or the job itself wasn't consuming my thoughts that year. I don't think that would be the case for a 2 1/2 year window. I'd still be shooting for work bonuses.
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Old 02-07-2015, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,431 posts, read 7,942,539 times
Reputation: 53557
I have a job where I have to be 100% engaged lest I do some serious harm to someone or worse. I can retire any time I want to especially after my 7 month financial goal is achieved. It's a wonderful feeling knowing that I go to work simply for the pure joy of it. I work in Mayberry and have never had a job that did so much for me nor a manager that went to bat for me like he did. It's hard to walk away from all that love. For now I've decided that I don't want to retire. That may change if they take away my shift and force me into a box. I've never been really good at being a sheeple.
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Old 02-07-2015, 12:12 PM
 
Location: CT
3,461 posts, read 1,859,653 times
Reputation: 4614
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I don't think you can fix what you did, OP. Except for the money part, details-wise, you may have planned your retirement, too early. My head was filled with relocation-related activity the year before I went out so I was able to function on auto-pilot on the job that last year. You've got 2 and a half years to go plus it sounds like you even already have the fun stuff (not just the have-to-do stuff) in your future planned. The problem, as I see it, is you are literally ready to retire now. Most people, when they say they are ready to retire, only mean they are fed up with their job and/or going to work and have looked into whether or not they have the money to do it and maybe scouted some locations if they plan to relocate. Because you were so thorough so early, you only have your job to think about and maybe therein lies your problem.

I researched my relocation to death but I love doing research. I even looked at annual events on the travel and tourism website for the state and then sought out pictures and YouTube and other videos on those events. I looked for webcams in the area. I even went so far as to research restaurants in the new location and look at their menus online and determine which dealership would service my car. I used Mapquest to check out how far things were from where I would be living. I have previously mentioned subscribing to local newspapers for the new location, as well. The stories just led me to research more things. I read up on my soon to be new senators, governor and representative. When I was at work that last year, new things I might research, popped into my head throughout the day. I couldn't wait to get home to check them out. But the point is, I did all that in a one year window, the year before I went out. I was so excited about moving to a new place and a new life that leaving the job or the job itself wasn't consuming my thoughts that year. I don't think that would be the case for a 2 1/2 year window. I'd still be shooting for work bonuses.
Great point! I may have jumped too far ahead in our plans, but my retirement date has moved +1 or 2 years to ensure financial stability, so that's why I'm a little further ahead of myself. FYI- I can assure you, I am remaining the consumate professional, I deal with college students and their safety and I still take that mission as seriously today as the day I started. It's just my motivation to get up and jump into the rat race every day, is getting weaker and weaker.
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