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Old 02-11-2015, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Colorado
274 posts, read 416,928 times
Reputation: 454

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rugrats2001 View Post
How about low-impact volunteer work with a church group or a homeless shelter?
I wasn't looking for a job because I was 'bored' or had to do something - I 'needed' the money ... I thought of volunteering but couldn't justify the gas money to get there when I needed it to pay bills ... like I said I have given up and just waiting
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Old 02-11-2015, 01:30 PM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,774 posts, read 14,897,329 times
Reputation: 11886
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
I just read in today's paper that Home Depot is starting hiring for spring. They plan to hire 80,000 new workers in their stores nationwide. They are one company that definitely doesn't age discriminate. Part of their original business plan was to hire retired tradespeople to work in the departments to be able to give advice on products, tools, and techniques to the customers. I have a 70 year old friend who has worked there for 2 years now. You can apply online at www.careers.homedepot.com .
I thought I could get a job at Lowes doing that very same thing since I am a retired contractor. Evidently Lowes does not have the same hiring practices as HD. Everytime I go shopping at Lowes I can't find any older people to help me and the younger ones rarely know the products.

We don't have HD in my area.
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Old 02-11-2015, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Downtown Rancho Cordova, CA
491 posts, read 1,098,674 times
Reputation: 399
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamasplace View Post
Not sure but from our experience it may depend on where you live and how the local economy is doing. We moved from the northeast to the South when hubby retired. We had the same idea of the part time job as well. It took him 9 months to even get considered for one and then when he gladly took it, it almost killed him- he was hired at Walgreens for the photo dept and yet they expected his 60 yr old body to run around like a 20 yr old schlepping merchandise and stocking cases up and down ladders. Not in the job description for sure but take it or leave it they said so he had to leave. It took him another few months to get another PT job- this one just as demanding but it was outside and he kept it for a bit. Not a good idea but he was stubborn :-)

Either PT job was not ideal by any means but I think it was the location- NC has high unemployment and PT jobs are snapped up quickly by anyone but especially younger people- the problem is the employer wants it ALL for meager wages and no benefits. Honestly to me the money was not worth the physical toll it took and my husband was a physically strong person!

Maybe for right now while you are still working, just save like crazy and then if you end up in the same boat you'll be okay.
I had the exact same experience working at Home Depot. It started out as a fun part-time job helping people in the plumbing dept. I really enjoyed the feeling that I was helping customers and using my experience. Then, HD's sales took a nose dive and they started cutting everyone's hours and expected floor people to stock and help customers at the same time. On many weekday nights, they tried to run the entire store with about 7 people covering multiple departments and everyone running themselves to death loading stuff for customers in other departments, handling crisis, handling returns and oh yeah did you get your stocking done? They made no allowances for an employee's age -- I was over 55 -- and some guys were over 60 and at least one guy was almost 70. We had all been supposedly been hired for our "experience". No surprise after awhile, I was really afraid I was going to hurt myself on a ladder or loading heavy items and I regretfully quit.

This is not even considering the fact that I once worked 20 straight Sundays and was subject to being called in (or told not to show up--when the store was slow) apart from my regular schedule.

All of the work would have been no big deal when I was 20, but it's a much different thing when you are 55. I learned that it's much harder these days for older workers to find a job they can do without the company expecting the body of a 20 year old.

Last edited by ElectroPlumber; 02-11-2015 at 03:47 PM..
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Old 02-12-2015, 02:30 AM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,986 posts, read 3,475,327 times
Reputation: 10538
My situation was a bit different. After I was laid off at 55, I was able to work temp jobs for awhile, but hen everything dried up. Just as I was contemplating what I was going to do, I was in a car accident & ended up with back injuries. Also at this time my sister, who was taking care of our mother, asked if I could help her & move to the family farm.

I did & I am so thankful for that time. While I was taking care of her, the visiting nurse came to see her & saw how gentle with mom. She reported it to the office & they called & asked if I would be willing to work part time with other clients. It was a position that was sometimes on-call but I soon had my regular clients, until my back got too bad. It was quite a switch from office work, but mostly rewarding.
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Old 02-12-2015, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,685 posts, read 17,640,506 times
Reputation: 27772
I know back home in TN, it is very difficult to get any kind of a job. The unemployment rate is actually worsening and people and jobs are leaving the area.
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Old 02-12-2015, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,815 posts, read 4,862,439 times
Reputation: 19538
Actually the unemployment rate in TN is improving, 6.6% in Dec 2014-down from a high of 7.4% in August 2014. TN overall is higher than the national rate of 5.6%, but Knoxville is the same as the national rate, 5.6%, and over the last year was better than the national rate for much of the year.

Knoxville, Tennessee Metropolitan Unemployment Rate and Total Unemployed | Department of Numbers

Knoxville and the surrounding communities are experiencing quite an influx of new jobs in the last year or two. Many companies are expanding and adding new jobs in the area as the economy improves and the state offers incentives to employers to build here.
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Old 02-12-2015, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Near the In-n-Out
30 posts, read 27,895 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
What about selling things online? Ebay, Craigslist, Amazon, Etsy.
That's what I've been doing. As we've been downsizing for retirement and moving I started an Ebay account and have been selling things a few at a time. Ebay makes it really easy to sell and ship. So far I've sold jeans $50, a leather top $275, bowling shoes $85, and old SNES video games $43 and $49 each. I just sold a video game to a buyer in Brazil! I ship it to Ebay in KY and they handle the rest. The flat rate USPS boxes make it even easier to ship and Ebay gives shipping discounts.

Now, I look around the house and see so many items to list. A lot of our stuff is vintage now!

The mobile app makes it ridiculously easy to post pictures to your listings.

I set up "Buy it Now" for seven days and the listings are free. If they don't sell no big deal, I just relist with a click and no charge unless it sells.

There are a lot of people making $$$$ listing items on Ebay and drop shipping. I'm going to look into that once we get settled.

Last edited by Bunny and Duder; 02-12-2015 at 10:15 AM..
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Old 02-12-2015, 04:28 PM
 
106 posts, read 112,738 times
Reputation: 298
I'm also 4 years out from retiring, and if I can get myself to work one more year after that, I will, although I'm pretty burned out from teaching in today's world. I started an Etsy site 9 years ago, and it's been through it's ebbs and flows, depending on my time and my needs.

In the last 2 years, I've been working very steadily on it, seeing it as my retirement 'job' once I retire from teaching. I sell jewelry that I create and has been my hobby and passion for over a decade now. This December, I grossed about $1800. It all started with taking a class at the local bead shop with a girlfriend. You never know.
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Old 02-12-2015, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Downtown Rancho Cordova, CA
491 posts, read 1,098,674 times
Reputation: 399
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunny and Duder View Post
That's what I've been doing. As we've been downsizing for retirement and moving I started an Ebay account and have been selling things a few at a time. Ebay makes it really easy to sell and ship. So far I've sold jeans $50, a leather top $275, bowling shoes $85, and old SNES video games $43 and $49 each. I just sold a video game to a buyer in Brazil! I ship it to Ebay in KY and they handle the rest. The flat rate USPS boxes make it even easier to ship and Ebay gives shipping discounts.

Now, I look around the house and see so many items to list. A lot of our stuff is vintage now!

The mobile app makes it ridiculously easy to post pictures to your listings.

I set up "Buy it Now" for seven days and the listings are free. If they don't sell no big deal, I just relist with a click and no charge unless it sells.

There are a lot of people making $$$$ listing items on Ebay and drop shipping. I'm going to look into that once we get settled.
I've been doing the same thing and made a little money too.

However, there are two things to look out for on Ebay now when you sell items:

1. Sellers can no longer leave negative feedback for buyers. This means there is no way to let the Ebay community know when a seller gets the shaft from a buyer.

2. No matter how a Seller describes his items for sale "AS IS", "NO RETURNS", etc, the buyer can demand that the seller accept a return of the goods and return all of the amount that the buyer paid (including the return shipping cost) if the Seller's description does not match the actual condition of the goods. No matter what the actual condition of the goods, Ebay always sides with the Buyer, except for really high dollar items (which actually gives the Seller an edge).

You might be able to sell an item as "for parts only" and avoid some of Ebay's onerous buyer oriented policies, but who wants to do that and get only low dollar bids when the item is in good condition?

The really bad news is that some buyers are actually pulling a scam where they demand a refund of their money from the seller and then ship a box back to the seller which contains rocks (to still weigh the same as the original item). Even in these situations, Ebay sides with the seller and will take the money out of the Seller's paypal account to reimburse the fraudulent buyer.

All of this has come about because Ebay now only cares about increasing the number of buyers who use Ebay, rather than protecting the rights of sellers.

This situation is well documented in Ebay's policies and in forums on the web.

Seller beware.
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Old 02-12-2015, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
9,018 posts, read 7,778,187 times
Reputation: 12267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vic Romano View Post
Just thinking out loud here...

I plan to retire in 4 years or so but if I decide to change plans and retire before then, it would be nice to have a part time job for a while to pay for the health insurance costs...

It would be nice to make the transition slowly from full time job. Otherwise I might find myself spending too much money!

I'm just wondering how hard it is to find a part-time job? Something where one would work 6 months a year or 20-30 hours a week...

I say part time jobs are easy to get. Especially the $10 to $12 per hour ones.

The mistake many make is thinking they can work say 20 hours per week and earn 1/2 of what they presently earn. Mainly wrongo on that thinking.
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