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Old 04-28-2015, 08:39 AM
 
950 posts, read 714,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
Every place gets its money one way or another unless it chooses to provide less services, which some places do. For example, virtually no rural area has paid, professional firefighters, but relies on volunteer fire departments. That lowers the taxes but raises home insurance because it's likely there will be more damage if there is a fire. Some states don't have state income taxes but charge sales tax on everything. Other states have personal property taxes based on the value of cars or RVs.
I firmly believe the opposite of your post that insinuates all places are equal.

Yes my current state( Arkansas ) has personal property taxes on vehicles and my former state (Minnesota) did not. However, my total tax bill here ..........2 vehicle personal property tax.....2 vehicle license fee..........real estate tax on house..........combined totals $620 per year

In Minnesota, real estate tax on comparable house in small comparable town would be about
$1800, license fees on those two vehicles were $290

Thus, although it would appear Arkansas is more expensive because they have personal property tax on autos and MN does not, I still save $1470 a year after paying extra taxes.

Also, my cooling bill in summer is way lower than my heating bill was in winter in MN.

those that say COL balances out are totally wrong.
There is a difference from city to city, state to state, and especially region to region.
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Old 05-01-2015, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,654 posts, read 3,237,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
I'm a fatalist about it. None of us will get out of this alive, no matter how often we run to the doctor? Might as well enjoy what time we have left! I have other priorities, but to each his own, as you say...
I'm with you otterhere. I try to go by the saying.... don't look for trouble if you don't have any. Or something along those lines. As we get older, I want to have some happy memories of retirement to look back on if for some reason I'm too sick to do anything but sit in a chair or lie in a bed.

I think some prudent planning is a good thing; but I don't want the rest of my life lived constantly worrying about trouble. In my younger life, there was plenty of trouble to deal with. But I am a survivor. No matter what happens, I'm keeping a positive attitude. As the old saying goes, more than one way to "skin" a cat. (Believe me, I would never do that to a cat.)
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Old 05-01-2015, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,337 posts, read 10,327,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
I'm a fatalist about it. None of us will get out of this alive, no matter how often we run to the doctor? Might as well enjoy what time we have left! I have other priorities, but to each his own, as you say...
I agree. Moving next to a hospital because you may get sick is like moving next to a cemetary because you know you're going to die.

Live the life you've got.
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Old 05-02-2015, 03:22 AM
 
71,471 posts, read 71,652,652 times
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living next to a hospital because you may get sick is different than living 100 miles away.

bigger issue is unless you can afford a medigap plan with your medicare you will need to go with an advantage plan.

you may find there is little in any network when you need any care beyond the family doctor.

it is one thing to plan around living next door to a hospital vs planning around what you will likely need .

healthcare costs are the 2nd biggest retirement expense after housing so you damn well better consider them ,allow for them and plan for them.

many of these issues will be like moving the brooklyn bridge 1" to the left after it is built if the network advantage plan's offer are piece meal at best because they don't fully offer all services in your area. in network. .

healthcare related bankruptcies are number 1 because of poor pre-planning around things.

priorities change in retirement vs what was important prior .

Last edited by mathjak107; 05-02-2015 at 03:53 AM..
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Old 05-02-2015, 06:55 AM
 
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Anyone that concerned about health care should probably just move into assisted living or a continuing care community associated with a nearby hospital. I guess it depends how sick you are and what you want to do with the rest of your life? But I do think many of us have been brainwashed into running to the doctor every five minutes, which mostly benefits the doctor, and obsessing over our state of health.
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Old 05-02-2015, 06:58 AM
 
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the problem is when many folks choose these areas they have zero health issues. i know with us right now health issues are not even on the radar. but we do know that as time goes on there can and will be issues.

it has nothing to do with anticipating assisted living or long term care , only the natural progression of life as we age.

making a commitment to buying a home you may not be able to sell easily or at all if the need arises is certainly something to think about when choosing a RETIREMENT area.

we have zero health issues but just a quick look at what was available to us in our area had us rethinking retiring to where our 2nd home was in the pocono's.

other concerns were getting out and finding things to do all winter when it is icy or snowy. here we jump on a train and can see shows in manhattan , museums , etc . always something to do and some way of getting there .

another big consideration , what if you wanted to or need to work. working at min wage in the deli or walmart if you are lucky may suck as far as income .

in fact just finding work when retired may be an issue in small towns .

as we put our retirement hats on to look at the future we realized the area contained little that we would want or need as we aged.

it gets harder and harder to make moves later on if you need to and many retirees will not be able to afford to down the road so you need to really think this through..

Last edited by mathjak107; 05-02-2015 at 07:27 AM..
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Old 05-14-2015, 06:47 AM
 
844 posts, read 745,509 times
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Thanks to everyone who replied. I think there needs to be a happy medium. You can have health issues at any age. Yes senior can have more health problems, but I know some healthy seniors and younger people with many health problems. Up here in Cherry Valley, NY there's a hospital 10 miles away, a satellite hospital 10 miles in the other direction, or a medical center 50 miles away. There is shopping 10 miles away. Yes there is no public transportation, but even when I lived in places that did have that, I still used a car. I like my freedom to come and go as I want and not rely on timetables. The day I can't drive means the day I may need assisted living anyway. And speaking of health care, I have heard that health care in the South is just horrible anyway. Never read or read any thing good about Southern health care, esp Fla.

I'd love to retire to and RV and travel, but my husband almost faints at the thought. LOL.

I found that the South appears to be more expensive to live in now because, as like everything else, people think of it as more "desirable", so the costs rise with the demand. I pay about $4000 in taxes, but my sister in Florida pays almost as much. I have a larger house and 103 acres!

I also found- and I can only speak about Florida- that FOOD is a lot more expensive down there. Food is cheaper here in regular supermarkets, then this being Amish country (NY has the fourth largest Amish population in the US) I can shop in Amish stores (were the Amish shop, not Amish tourist stores) and get staples even cheaper.

Has anyone else find that the South is getting expensive and that NYS is not as expensive as they say? Yes NYC and LI are expensive (property tax can run $10, 000- $15,000/ year) but I'm talking about upstate.
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by countrykaren View Post
Thanks to everyone who replied. I think there needs to be a happy medium. You can have health issues at any age. Yes senior can have more health problems, but I know some healthy seniors and younger people with many health problems. Up here in Cherry Valley, NY there's a hospital 10 miles away, a satellite hospital 10 miles in the other direction, or a medical center 50 miles away. There is shopping 10 miles away. Yes there is no public transportation, but even when I lived in places that did have that, I still used a car. I like my freedom to come and go as I want and not rely on timetables. The day I can't drive means the day I may need assisted living anyway. And speaking of health care, I have heard that health care in the South is just horrible anyway. Never read or read any thing good about Southern health care, esp Fla.

I'd love to retire to and RV and travel, but my husband almost faints at the thought. LOL.

I found that the South appears to be more expensive to live in now because, as like everything else, people think of it as more "desirable", so the costs rise with the demand. I pay about $4000 in taxes, but my sister in Florida pays almost as much. I have a larger house and 103 acres!

I also found- and I can only speak about Florida- that FOOD is a lot more expensive down there. Food is cheaper here in regular supermarkets, then this being Amish country (NY has the fourth largest Amish population in the US) I can shop in Amish stores (were the Amish shop, not Amish tourist stores) and get staples even cheaper.

Has anyone else find that the South is getting expensive and that NYS is not as expensive as they say? Yes NYC and LI are expensive (property tax can run $10, 000- $15,000/ year) but I'm talking about upstate.
Florida doesn't tax private pensions or social security, so obviously that makes it "desirable" to people with that stream of income... However, they will manage to get it some other way; they aren't doing without it!
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:49 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,427 posts, read 1,664,703 times
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I live 50 miles north of NYC, considered upstate, but a bedroom community within commuting distance the city, so it a has higher COL. We also have a home in FL too, so have both at least for a while. Some things are more expensive in both, but FL is easily cheaper for us compared to here and there is no comparison between houses, the FL one is far superior in space and amenities, but the NY one wins on charm. The houses have the same selling value.

We just switched to a physician group in FL and the medical care has been a big surprise. Like others I thought the South would be sub par. Our experiences have proved otherwise. I was referred to a gynecologist and an gastroenterologist for a colonoscopy. My info was sent to those offices and I was told I would be contacted within 24-48 hours to set up appointments: Northern me: yeah, right. I was surprised when they both did call within 24 hours. I also had a 3D mammogram with a follow up ultrasound at a breast imaging center that is ACR certified. Communications between offices and between me and the offices were excellent.

The offices can access my info on computers with no delay. I have a patient portal with access to my info also. My physician and referring physicians all have 5 star ratings with our insurance company. This is all anecdotal from my prospective, but the biggest difference? Everyone in the offices were professional, yet pleasant and friendly. That has not been my experience in my area of NY.

I enjoy both places and can build arguments pro and con to support either place, depending on how I want to slant my opinions.

Last edited by jean_ji; 05-14-2015 at 08:14 AM..
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Old 05-14-2015, 08:02 AM
 
7,794 posts, read 4,381,326 times
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Again, I don't plan to spend my golden years having colonoscopies. But that's just me!
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