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Old 02-09-2015, 05:47 PM
 
143 posts, read 132,698 times
Reputation: 802

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As a retired university instructor, I can tell you that I was delighted to have older students in my courses. They were always very serious, motivated and engaged--often adding insight and experience to class discussions. The younger students appreciated their presence as well. So don't let your age inhibit you.

I do share in the expressed concern about traveling out of state, particularly to attend a community college. Many of the computer and technical courses you identify are available from subscription services online. You can study to any breadth and depth you wish and at your own pace. I am certain there are computer science undergraduate and graduate students available (they always need extra money) you may hire for extra help in the technical areas if you find you need it.

If you have a major college or university with a school of business in your area check with them about "auditing" their business and marketing courses. Most colleges will allow this on a space available basis and the fees are much less. When you audit a course you attend lectures and labs but you don't sit for exams or receive college credit. If the courses are full, speak with the instructor. They may let you join the course for the reasons I mentioned above.

Good luck, and never tire of learning!
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Old 02-09-2015, 06:39 PM
 
268 posts, read 212,126 times
Reputation: 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeonGecko View Post
If you are 65 or older, most universities have reduced rates for seniors to take classes. You won't get credit - but it sounds like you aren't interested in credit. In fact some colleges offer this at lower ages than 65, you'd have to check.

I would suggest a course of self-study mixed with online seminars and classes at your local college. A lot of the stuff on your list is basically "how to use" a software package. You can get that sort of training almost anywhere without having to pull up stakes and move to another state.

You can also find out what books are required for those classes, and just get the books and work through them on your own. I don't see anything on there that should actually require sitting-your-butt-in-a-chair class time, especially if you fill it out with online information and asking for help when you're stuck on the appropriate forum.

The math and accounting courses will have some kind of equivalent available through your local college.

Here is a reputable online source for classes on a wide variety of subjects. All free to boot.
Yeah, that's what I need to do, sit by myself 10 hours a day, in front of a computer. THAT'S THE PROBLEM.

I'm disappointed that not one person seems to notice what I wrote in the OP:

>> I guess I'd like to hear about others who have gone down this road.

I really wasn't asking for approval. Or advice. I'm a classic late bloomer, finished my BA at 37, my masters five years later. I bet I'd be fine there, and I don't look my age.

Nobody else has tried this? That, after all, is what I was inquiring about, not whether you approve of the decision or not.
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Old 02-09-2015, 07:50 PM
 
143 posts, read 132,698 times
Reputation: 802
Quote:
Originally Posted by happypants 3235 View Post
Yeah, that's what I need to do, sit by myself 10 hours a day, in front of a computer. THAT'S THE PROBLEM.

I'm disappointed that not one person seems to notice what I wrote in the OP:

>> I guess I'd like to hear about others who have gone down this road.

I really wasn't asking for approval. Or advice. I'm a classic late bloomer, finished my BA at 37, my masters five years later. I bet I'd be fine there, and I don't look my age.

Nobody else has tried this? That, after all, is what I was inquiring about, not whether you approve of the decision or not.

I think people did the best they could in an attempt to answer a question that was not particularly clear or coherent.
Add some specifics to your question and you might get the answer(s) you are after.
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Old 02-09-2015, 08:21 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,943,432 times
Reputation: 18050
Quote:
Originally Posted by happypants 3235 View Post
As I stated, I'm an entrepreneur, so I own my own business. Not even a marginal interest in working for anyone. Have two degrees in the subject area of the products I'm selling, but no training in business, programming, web design. I'm self-taught in those areas. Doing okay but could do a lot better.
Have you look at courses thru local chamber of commerce dealing with the business end of small enterprise. The government funds a lot of them.
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Old 02-10-2015, 04:48 AM
 
268 posts, read 212,126 times
Reputation: 190
>> I think people did the best they could in an attempt to answer a question that was not particularly clear or coherent.
Add some specifics to your question and you might get the answer(s) you are after.

Well let me clarify then: Can anyone speak about either their own experience, or that of someone they know, with respect to returning to school in their late 60's? (Better?)

Posters have made much of the moving to another state, but there are several other reasons for moving, both personal and health related, not just for school. I also didn't ask for alternatives. Granted, this may be an effort to revisit the pleasure I felt in the "professional student" lifestyle from younger days. Not even maybe: it is, no doubt. Most people won't relate to this.

Last edited by happypants 3235; 02-10-2015 at 04:57 AM..
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Old 02-10-2015, 06:32 AM
 
477 posts, read 399,292 times
Reputation: 1547
Quote:
Originally Posted by happypants 3235 View Post
Yeah, that's what I need to do, sit by myself 10 hours a day, in front of a computer. THAT'S THE PROBLEM.

I'm disappointed that not one person seems to notice what I wrote in the OP:

>> I guess I'd like to hear about others who have gone down this road.

I really wasn't asking for approval. Or advice. I'm a classic late bloomer, finished my BA at 37, my masters five years later. I bet I'd be fine there, and I don't look my age.

Nobody else has tried this? That, after all, is what I was inquiring about, not whether you approve of the decision or not.
This is what you wrote in the OP:

Quote:
Originally Posted by happypants 3235 View Post
I hate to be a whiner, but . . .I want to up my technology skills at a community college in another state, but that would require moving (which is a huge pain, of course), and by the time I had taken the coursework I need (to support my entrepreneurship activities), I'd be in my early '70's!

I guess I'd like to hear about others who have gone down this road.

You didn't say anything about wanting to reduce isolation. You only talked about wanting to take courses to improve your professional standing, which might require a move, and you made it sound like that was something you were reluctant to do ("moving ... which is a huge pain...). You also expressed some trepidation about the length of time this might take ("I'd be in my early 70s!").

I noticed the last part but couldn't help you with that. Instead I responded to this post and the follow-on where you listed a long list of coursework, in an effort to respond to what I COULD help you with, which seemed to be all about wanting to up your skills yet being reluctant to move and concerned about the length of time this might take.

Apparently it is actually about feeling lonely and isolated. However we can't read minds - so we didn't know that because you didn't say so in those first couple of posts. And btw, people giving you advice to help you reach your STATED goals means they APPROVE - not disapprove.

I'm sorry you feel let down, but yelling at people about not getting answers to the concerns you didn't specify is perhaps not your best move.

I think you should start a new thread where you specify exactly what you are looking for - because I, for one, am still not really clear on what your goals are. There is a subtext here which is strongly implied but which you have glossed over in your last posting - and that is your feeling of isolation that led you to yell at me for suggesting some ways to get some of these classes for free and online - which I did based on your implied reluctance to move.

So maybe if you explain the reasons behind the move - instead of the way you originally expressed it, as being necessary to get these classes (which it isn't) and being something you didn't really want to do ("it is a huge pain").

Maybe that would help us to help you better. Because honestly, your goals and situation are very unclear at this point.

As for people not understanding wanting to go back to their college days - I think there are a LOT of people who would understand that feeling very well.

I didn't go back to school at 60 - but I went back to school at 50. And there was a part of me that was looking forward to recreating the college days I remembered. But it turns out - a large part of my first college experience was closely intertwined with being 18, and being free of abusive home and high school situations. A lot of the way that people responded to me was closely enmeshed with my being 18, and my classmates being 18, and the ways that middle aged teachers respond to enthusiastic 18 year old students.

Now, I had instructors who were younger than me, some of whom clearly had problems of self-esteem, and who felt threatened by me. One in particular clearly had mommy-issues, even though I was far from responding to her as if she were a child of mine. She projected her issues onto me anyway.

Then, another who felt that she was going to "mentor" me - which I had no idea was her intent. When I did not go to her for "guidance" as she felt I should, she turned mean - and I do mean MEAN. For heaven's sake, she was about my age and I have lived plenty in my half-century plus - I'm not clay for the molding. This was the OPPOSITE of the other problem - an instructor who put me in a parental role, recreating in her mind whatever conflict she experienced with her parents. This one was putting me in the role of a teenager, herself as the guiding mother figure, and then responded badly when I did not fill that role for her.

The point is not that there is anything wrong with going back to school. But it is not going to be the same experience for you at 65 or 67 - 30 years later - that it was at 30-something. Just keep that in mind.

Not knowing what your actual goals are, I can't comment on how this might or might not reduce your sense of isolation. But ... just a thought ... at this point you and I are old enough to be perceived as the parent or grandparent of most of the rest of the people in the classes at a community college. Its not the same as being in your 30s - just 10 or 15 years older than your classmates. Now you are 30 or 40 years older. If it is companionship and camaraderie you are seeking - I think there are other ways that might work better for that than paying to go to community college.

There's an additional concern with going back to school at our ages. In my case, I got hit with health problems which ultimately resulted in my disability - so I didn't get to finish my degree. SO here's my take on going back to school this late in life:

I would not do it again, had I known then what I know now about the ultimate state of my health.

"It" being not going back to school - but going back in a degree program.

I would much rather have just taken a class here and there purely for fun. In fact, I would STILL like to do that. Just not in a formal degree program.

YMMV
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Old 02-10-2015, 07:14 AM
 
268 posts, read 212,126 times
Reputation: 190
@Neon: Wow, you really took a lot of time and effort to defend yourself over a trivial matter, and to have the last word. Bit of overkill, wouldn't you say? I *did* finish my degree--two if them, in fact, one from one of the schools cited on the excellent link you offered, https://www.edx.org/course. Don't suppose that could have anything to do with the disproportionate response?

In fact, I'm one of the designers of the open source coursework from one of those universities.

Anyway, no one--least if all me--is aware of their every underlying motivation. I do know you're trying to help, but like most of us humans you are filtering your responses through the mesh of your own psychological construct, rather than what is requested. No harm done.

Last edited by happypants 3235; 02-10-2015 at 08:37 AM..
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Old 02-10-2015, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Ormond Beach Fl
86 posts, read 94,807 times
Reputation: 266
Other people who may have taken the route you suggest probably do not have time to peruse an infinite blog- they are busy with their classes and entrepreneurship, so maybe, as was suggested, visit a school and talk to someone, audit a class.... You may take some online, some in person. You have an agressive lineup of classes you would like, maybe a multi approach will work. Just keep,taking steps toward your goal, there is no failure. You will inspire young and old alike. Some schools have Osher institute, meant for life long learning.... With a little elbow grease you will find the teacher-- student. My long over winded post only meant to say that the feedback you are looking for May not be here, but it is out there! Best of luck.
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Old 02-10-2015, 08:45 AM
 
268 posts, read 212,126 times
Reputation: 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by Native ny View Post
Other people who may have taken the route you suggest probably do not have time to peruse an infinite blog- they are busy with their classes and entrepreneurship, so maybe, as was suggested, visit a school and talk to someone, audit a class.... You may take some online, some in person. You have an agressive lineup of classes you would like, maybe a multi approach will work. Just keep,taking steps toward your goal, there is no failure. You will inspire young and old alike. Some schools have Osher institute, meant for life long learning.... With a little elbow grease you will find the teacher-- student. My long over winded post only meant to say that the feedback you are looking for May not be here, but it is out there! Best of luck.
I attended this school in the past, around 12 years ago, taking some coursework in entrepreneurship with which I started a second incarnation of my business. The school has undergone an astonishing transformation since then. My guess is that if I hang around, taking classes and behaving myself, I might be put to work, at least part time, which would be great fun, I think.

I don't really need the (a) job but the graphics design job I had at IBM (before about 400 of us were laid off), seems to carry some weight. Being in a classroom, having something to look forward to every day, interacting with real people (versus the online, anonymous variety), seems very attractive.

Thank you for the good wishes!
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Old 02-10-2015, 09:21 AM
 
477 posts, read 399,292 times
Reputation: 1547
Quote:
Originally Posted by happypants 3235 View Post
@Neon: Wow, you really took a lot of time and effort to defend yourself over a trivial matter, and to have the last word. Bit of overkill, wouldn't you say? I *did* finish my degree--two if them, in fact, one from one of the schools cited on the excellent link you offered, https://www.edx.org/course. Don't suppose that could have anything to do with the disproportionate response?
What the .... Overkill? Defensive? Disproportionate response ... to what, and why would EdX have anything to do with anything??? And where did I imply that you HADN'T already finished your degrees???


Quote:
Originally Posted by happypants 3235 View Post
In fact, I'm one of the designers of the open source coursework from one of those universities.

Anyway, no one--least if all me--is aware of their every underlying motivation. I do know you're trying to help, but like most of us humans you are filtering your responses through the mesh of your own psychological construct, rather than what is requested. No harm done.
And that's what I get for trying to help someone who has already rejected nearly every encouraging post in this thread.

I wish you good luck.
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