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Old 02-11-2015, 11:22 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,764 posts, read 7,047,160 times
Reputation: 14300

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
When I retired almost 10 years ago, my HR department used the same form for resignations and retirements - you checked off which it was. One item to fill out was "I am taking this action for the following reasons:" Well, that made sense if you were resigning, but for retirement it didn't seem to me any "reason" was necessary. Therefore, I typed in the following (honestly, I did):

"Extreme old age has left me but a broken and hollow shell of my former dynamic, witty, and incisive self. Atrophy has left sagging and skinny limbs where once reigned well-toned sinews. Mental and visual acuity are but dim memories. Time to go!"

My immediate supervisor had to sign the form before I submitted it to HR, and he cracked up. I got back a copy from HR with a date stamp and a report number to the governing board, but no reaction to my attempt at humor. No reason they would react to it, of course.

Any similar stories out there?
I don't think my employer asked for reasons for retirement on the forms I had to fill out and sign. I'm thinking an employee shouldn't be required to provide a reason he/she wants to retire at a particular time, and in reality, the reasons probably are myriad for most people. If asked, I'd have said, 1) "Because I can", and 2) "It's high time."
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Old 02-11-2015, 11:25 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,764 posts, read 7,047,160 times
Reputation: 14300
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
We had an exit interview in which some lady from HR reads the questions to you and then you can answer them out loud or write your answers on a form. I thought that was really odd. First, I can read, I don't need her to read the questions. Second, why say it out loud to someone who is just following some weird protocol. I wrote my answers, and mainly I just said "I'm tired of all this, and ready to leave". What do they really expect you to say?
From what I could see when I retired, my coworkers, managers and everyone involved didn't have to ask reasons for my retiring, they already knew and they wished they could retire too!
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Old 02-11-2015, 11:54 AM
 
3,945 posts, read 3,266,434 times
Reputation: 11331
I do remember the "exit interview" with the HR rep who handled my paperwork at retirement, he asked that question of why and my reply was that "I had found something better to occupy my time". He was at first hesitant to write that down but I insisted as it fit the kind of bland responses the company was known for when our employee inquiries were dismissed by management in their administrative-speak.

I heard that these interviews were later abandoned by HR and viewed that as a positive sign of the companies expressed desire to treat their employees as valued people . At sixty two I figured I'd payed my dues and resented the fact that the company felt a need to badger their employees at that late date of their service.
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Old 02-11-2015, 12:31 PM
 
14,264 posts, read 24,009,233 times
Reputation: 20092
Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
I do remember the "exit interview" with the HR rep who handled my paperwork at retirement, he asked that question of why and my reply was that "I had found something better to occupy my time". He was at first hesitant to write that down but I insisted as it fit the kind of bland responses the company was known for when our employee inquiries were dismissed by management in their administrative-speak.

I heard that these interviews were later abandoned by HR and viewed that as a positive sign of the companies expressed desire to treat their employees as valued people . At sixty two I figured I'd payed my dues and resented the fact that the company felt a need to badger their employees at that late date of their service.

I had to go through that whole exit interview process. I had to choose to either 1) tell them in great detail that I did not like the direction that things were going or 2) just tell them that I decided to retire. I did the latter. What is the benefit of burning bridges?
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Old 02-11-2015, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
6,128 posts, read 9,091,165 times
Reputation: 11545
No one asked me but if they had I would have said:
" I can't stand this freakin job anymore. It's driving me crazy and you are all a bunch of nuts. Good bye and good ridance."
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Old 02-11-2015, 12:51 PM
 
Location: NC
6,571 posts, read 7,996,310 times
Reputation: 13471
I work in an "at will" state. That means an employer can fire you at any time for no reason whatsoever. The flip side is that an employee can leave at any time with no reason, even when that reason is retirement. The only advantage to giving a reason for retiring would be to go on record with some kind of complaint. However, the HR person would ignore it.
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Old 02-11-2015, 01:42 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,154,879 times
Reputation: 10910
Possible future swan song:

"I have been rearranging deck chairs on various ships for 50 years. Alas, this one is nuclear powered, clipping along at 35 knots, and there is a mile wide iceberg 1/4 mile ahead."
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Old 02-11-2015, 02:43 PM
 
Location: it depends
6,074 posts, read 5,337,706 times
Reputation: 5771
"The voices in my head voted 13-8 in favor of retirement."
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Old 02-11-2015, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,118 posts, read 8,162,030 times
Reputation: 18774
Actually, I never "retired". I sold my business. It was time. I was 65.

It was only in my own mind that I retired.
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Old 02-11-2015, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,988,950 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Alas, I can't add one. Either they didn't care or they figured out I was simply ready to go. No such paperwork necessary.
You mean when they saw you get carried out on a stretcher?
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