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Old 02-17-2015, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Midwest
1,469 posts, read 862,247 times
Reputation: 2339

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Quote:
Originally Posted by luvmyhoss View Post
Very hard to find positive people.

WOW!!!!! My husband & I just retired this year and I had to stop reading the posts because it was getting depressing...
I understand declining health being a downer but most of the time it is boredom that causes more problems than health concerns. Eventually all of us will have health concerns but somehow all the aches and pains of old age seem worse if you don't have a purpose in life. Quit comparing how many pills you take with your friends and find something FUN to do to take your mind off of it instead. There are enough sad things to focus on in old age why add fuel to the fire.
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Old 02-17-2015, 07:27 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
7,629 posts, read 14,396,108 times
Reputation: 18712
I can not help but wonder if there is more than just medical issues (like possibly the related cost and burden financially) that spurs some of this.

We have worked hard, are in decent health, only take BP medication, and have an active lifestyle. Having said that, we are HAPPY with retirement, because we have the financial security that gives us the freedom to travel, enjoy and look forward to planning things we could never afford while raising, educating kids and paying things off.

I think that LIFE is a mindset, and if your goal is to enjoy it to the max, then you will get far more from it regardless of your age.

I realize that many forced to retire or without means find the Golden years frightening, and I sympathize...but for those of us that have planned, worked, saved and look forward to a life of spending everyday with your BEST FRIEND aka spouse, they ARE GOLDEN years!!!
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Old 02-17-2015, 08:25 PM
 
14,276 posts, read 24,038,486 times
Reputation: 20111
This morning, I went to my part-time volunteer job after a pleasant stroll in 60F, no rain weather. I did about five hours of work, gathered up my belongings and took off.

I walked on over to Saigon Pho, which is one of my favorite pho restaurants and had a great bowl of beef and noodles. I was joined by a couple of young Vietnamese ladies who are UA students and a nice conversation over lunch.

After lunch, I walked on over to a small park next to a grove of kumquat trees and read today's issue of the Wall Street Journal and watched all the students walking by. Then, unfortunately, I read this thread which I found to be very depressing.

After that, I folded up the paper, placed it in my bag and strolled over and caught my bus and headed home.

Golden years? I sure think so.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,772,783 times
Reputation: 32309
Default So many things affect health, including having a purpose!

Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
As I've mentioned on a couple of other threads on this subject, I have retired twice, once for a year and a half and then for 3 years. Both times I have gone back to work......started out as part time now full time again.

The primary reason was that being retired didn't work for me. I could only play with my toys so much and I found myself getting out of bed at 11 am, goofing off for a while, then napping on the couch, curled up with a cat or two. One day ran into the next, and I was losing my social skills and my physical and mental health were suffering due to lack of exercise and interfacing with other people.

Now, life has purpose again and I am expected to be somewhere 5 days a week. The extra money ain't all bad either ! I will probably work until I am not physically able to do it any more, and I hope that doesn't happen for a lot more years.

Don
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
I'm 67, retired at 65 from owning a trucking firm. I immediately had both knees replaced, 8 weeks apart. This was due to the heavy work I'd been doing, not due to "old age". I don't regret that surgery,as now I live pain-free, and have no other problems; I take no meds. For those who complain of arthritic fingers and white beards, I can show you youngsters of 10 and 20 who live with far worse, so quitcher complainin'.

I have a friend who, healthy on his 65th birthday, celebrated Medicare by visiting not one, but three (!!!) doctors, and came home with a large bag of presriptions. A year later, he was but a shadow of his former self - old and feeble. People: think twice before taking just anything they prescribe for you!

I believe that the mind controls the body in many more ways than is commonly thought. The minute you begin to feel "old" in your mind, your body will respond in kind. Do what I do - keep living your life as if you weren't your age. After all, it's only a number!
Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
..........

That article posted about the study was spot on, IMO. I can feel such an improvement in my health, energy, and sharpness since going back to work. I read somewhere that seniors should do things like crossword puzzles to keep their mental edge, but I get to solve problems for my customers all day long, and that keeps me very stimulated.

................... One more plus is that it is nice to be appreciated by the people and company you work for.....it makes you feel still valuable.

Don
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paka View Post
I can not help but wonder if there is more than just medical issues (like possibly the related cost and burden financially) that spurs some of this. .....................
I believe many people hold too narrow a view of what affects our health and well-being. There are certain obvious things that are important, such as not smoking, being physically active, eating lots of fruits and vegetables, and maintaining a reasonable weight. But beyond that, I believe that it is important to engage in activities and interactions that are meaningful to us. All the posts I quoted above (some in part) touch on aspects of that.

Disclaimer: I am not saying that being vibrantly engaged with life is any guarantee of anything, just that it ups our chances of remaining vibrant. Sort of like not smoking will not guarantee perfect health, but it improves our chances.

Poster Don found meaning and health in going back to working for pay, but many find it in their own projects, hobbies, and/or volunteer work.

Second disclaimer: Lots of posters in this Retirement Forum do not like very much structure in their lives, and they are doing just fine. So it is quite possible that some people need those meaningful activities more than others.

Lack of structure does not have to equal isolation though; I think it's the isolation which is deadly, and there is epidemiological evidence to support that. We need to LOOK FORWARD actively to something, and that something can take many forms. And going a step further, I believe it's healthful to be challenged - not over-challenged to the point of being heavily stressed like so many people were when they worked full-time, but a certain degree of challenge in life.
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Old 02-17-2015, 09:25 PM
 
10,824 posts, read 8,086,306 times
Reputation: 17038
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
Golden years? I sure think so.
For me also, age 66 and retired now for 3 years, 3 months. DH would say the same, he's 64 and been retired for 2 years.

Every day is golden, But then we were happy too while working, so maybe we just have a positive outlook in general?
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Old 02-17-2015, 10:10 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,177,098 times
Reputation: 10910
Like I said on another thread, I have simple wants. Step one will be trying to catch up on my 12,000 hour plus sleep deficit. After that accomplishment, let's see what I can do in terms of a bucket list.
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Old 02-17-2015, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Gods country
5,602 posts, read 4,365,019 times
Reputation: 7780
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
We spend a lot of time in Guest homes of retirees. We have several hosts that have declined very rapidly shortly after retirement. In one case, they have been driving for 2 yrs w/o license, as neither of the couple can pass the eye exam. They are rural, so must drive to get feed / supplies. They keep the trips very minimal, and we drive and run errands for them (Staying extra days if necessary).

More than one couple 'wear-out' / get injured building the 'dream-house'.

We just bought an incomplete rural house that 2 separate couples have tried to build after their retirement (dying in the process). I think we can finish it in the next 2 months... hope we live that long!

Traffic accidents / falls can cause lifelong reduction in mobility.

then there is the 'other stuff' ... (normal aging)
My mom drove without a license and minimal insurance. She had an accident and it cost her 100K.
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Old 02-17-2015, 10:23 PM
 
10,824 posts, read 8,086,306 times
Reputation: 17038
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
We have several hosts that have declined very rapidly shortly after retirement. In one case, they have been driving for 2 yrs w/o license, as neither of the couple can pass the eye exam. They are rural, so must drive to get feed / supplies. They keep the trips very minimal, and we drive and run errands for them (Staying extra days if necessary).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Above Average Bear View Post
My mom drove without a license and minimal insurance. She had an accident and it cost her 100K.
StealhRabbit, you're aiding and abetting your hosts. Not a smart move.
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Old 02-18-2015, 12:08 AM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
39,592 posts, read 47,862,313 times
Reputation: 110541
Quote:
Originally Posted by Above Average Bear View Post
My mom drove without a license and minimal insurance. She had an accident and it cost her 100K.
How ccould she legally get auto insurance without a valid driver's license??
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Old 02-18-2015, 02:21 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,390 posts, read 10,375,338 times
Reputation: 28646
The insurance is on the vehicle.
I've never been asked for my driver's license when getting insurance-but maybe that varies by state?

I don't know.


Anyway, yea I agree about having a positive attitude being the best medicine.
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