U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-21-2015, 02:17 PM
 
1,826 posts, read 2,595,656 times
Reputation: 1783

Advertisements

We live on Lake Anna, Virginia which exists thanks to the Anna Nuclear power plant, two reactors. Some of you may remember this from the Mid Atlantic earthquake a few years ago. We are ten miles from the epicenter in Mineral, Va. The reactors did EXACTLY as they were supposed to do in shutting down. The earthquake was a 5.8. I heard later the power plants were build to withstand up to a 5.8 and I heard they actually calculated that at the site of the reactors it was actually slightly above what they were built to withstand, and they did EXACTLY what they were made to do...shut down. Yes, there's an evacuation plan and I also decided that would be crazy if needed. There is a quarterly test of the warning system so I know what it sounds like. No, I don't my worry about living there. It's a beautiful place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-21-2015, 02:26 PM
 
1,826 posts, read 2,595,656 times
Reputation: 1783
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
"Sharing the water" is not an issue. That water never actually mixes with any nuclear material; it is used solely for cooling in the plant. After carrying off the heat, it is discharged back into the waterways. It is somewhat warmer, and that causes its own issues, but no - it's not radioactive. you can boat in it, swim in it, even drink it if you filter it first. It won't hurt anything.
^^^this. Lake Anna has two sides, the public, or cool, side and the private, or "warm" side which is smaller. The private side is behind three dikes and that's where the water is discharged that was used in the plant. It's supposed about three degrees warmer than the public side. I've never been over there, mainly because it is totally separately by the dikes and there are no public facilities, not even a marina. Some people love it. I wouldn't want to have to haul gas in for my boat. The biggest issue we have with water is upstream where there's potential bacterial runoff from the few farms that still buffer the lake. Those cows do like grazing down by the water.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2015, 04:58 PM
 
774 posts, read 590,718 times
Reputation: 1340
I grew up in a town with one, and we never had an accident. It makes people nervous though. My mom says she hates having the plant in town, but she loves her town, so she stays there. (And wants me to move there.) On the upside, the plant is a good source of tax revenue for the town, which provides a lot of money for the schools.


If you're looking at a home for retirement, that means you are older. Older people don't need to worry about radiation as much as people with children. Children are more susceptible to it. Besides, it takes awhile for cancer to develop, and you could die from other causes before that.


Nuclear accidents don't happen often, but they do happen. They are a bigger risk at older plants.


If there is an accident and people need to evacuate, the people who live in the same town as the plant are the ones most likely to receive government assistance. We saw this in Fukushima. Fukushima covers a very large area, and some parts of it were not as severely affected as other areas outside Fukushima, but people in hot spots outside of Fukushima did not get the same kind of help as people within Fukushima. From that standpoint, being in the city limits of the town with the plant is a form of insurance against the economic losses of any potential evacuation.


However, nuclear plants do vent, and release some radiation when they do. Some research indicates higher rates of certain cancers within a certain range of nuclear plants. Some people might dispute that. I haven't really studied it myself. But, as I said, this is less of a concern for older people than people with children.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2015, 06:03 PM
 
Location: The South
5,214 posts, read 3,628,854 times
Reputation: 7891
Every day in the USA millions of people get in their cars and head out on the roads. Each car has about 15 gal. of gasoline beneath the floor boards. They will be going down the road at 60 or 70 mph and meeting cars head on running the same speed. If they are on mufti-lane highways, they will have cars either side of them going the same speed, each one loaded with 15 gals. of gasoline. Some of them will be using the cell phone, some eating, some making out.
I don't worry about nuclear plants.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2015, 07:22 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,824 posts, read 18,832,665 times
Reputation: 33721
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern man View Post
Every day in the USA millions of people get in their cars and head out on the roads. Each car has about 15 gal. of gasoline beneath the floor boards. They will be going down the road at 60 or 70 mph and meeting cars head on running the same speed. If they are on mufti-lane highways, they will have cars either side of them going the same speed, each one loaded with 15 gals. of gasoline. Some of them will be using the cell phone, some eating, some making out.
I don't worry about nuclear plants.
But car accidents have nothing to do with whether nuclear plants are safe. There's no actual proof but I know that quite some time ago a nuclear plant not too far from where I used to live was finally closed down. It discharged into a river and children living along that river had a much higher than average level of leukemia than other children. I think the parents all got together got the thing shut down--but again, I'm not saying that's proof. Sometimes we find things out after it's too late. How many of us remember getting our feet xrayed for new shoes? Perfectly safe?
__________________
my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2015, 07:38 PM
 
Location: NC
4,534 posts, read 7,318,467 times
Reputation: 4738
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
Well if given a choice I would rather not; remember three mile island.
Unfortunately, many people here don't remember or know of it - especially younger people. I live in the Raleigh area and a part of the Three Mile Island reactor (refurbished generator) is now in the nuclear power plant 20 or miles SW of Raleigh south of the town of Holly Springs in New Hill. Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I was pretty shocked when our local power co said they had a part from the TMI reactor. I remember watching it unfold on TV in 79, those were some PO'd ppl who lost their homes. I felt so bad for them.

As to the poster who said that iodine pills don't help adults, or as much. True that if radioactive iodine is released from a power plant that it affects children, and the younger the more so, than adults, although it does affect adults. As the thyroid needs iodine for hormone production, it doesn't know the difference between iodine pills (non radioactive) and radioactive iodine from a nuclear source. So to get some regular iodine into your system to build up in the thyroid before the radioactive stuff hits you, give you some protection from thyroid cancer. But iodine doesn't protect you again other forms of radioactive materials. Anyhow, if you don't have pills, you can smear the iodine solution used for cuts, on the inside of your arm from the elbow down. Be careful with kids. You need to look up the dosage amount.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2015, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,543,222 times
Reputation: 29032
I spent my entire childhood right across the river from America's first nuclear plant and two coal-fired plants. Everyone in my family has been reasonably healthy. My father died at age 80 of a stroke but he was a heavy smoker for many decades. My mother is nearing 90. As an adult, I worked in the energy field and I have been inside nuclear plants many, many times. I was in Harrisburg, PA, the day after the Three Mile Island accident. I'm no worse for the wear.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2015, 08:26 PM
 
284 posts, read 259,150 times
Reputation: 715
I appreciate all the responses and understand that today's plants are by and large safe. Guess it's that "what if" scenario that bothers me. I was looking into South Carolina particularly around Lake Keowee. Beautiful area but that plant was built in the 70's and has a good bit of info out there that has caused me some concerns. Guess I was just surprised at the concentration of plants in TN and the Carolinas but then most of those beautiful lakes were created for power generation after all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2015, 09:15 PM
 
1,825 posts, read 1,415,299 times
Reputation: 1375
Why not tell a real estate agent you want to live within a mile of a 50 year old nuclear power plant? Have protests shouting I want cancer! I want cancer! And then start smoking a couple of cartons of cigarettes each day? They can't possibly be harmful since our corporate run govt cares about us so much & would be glad to lose billions to save our lives.

Some of you might want to look up radiation sickness & see if you would want it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2015, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,611 posts, read 9,674,534 times
Reputation: 10948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weichert View Post
I think L'd rather live close to those than near a paper mill.
I agree with that! I lived about half a mile from one in Oregon. Thankfully it wasn't bad every day. They used the 'pulp soup' on our dirt roads to keep the dust down and it hardened like concrete...for a while. If it got on your car it never came off either.

We have a nuke plant near Phoenix and I don't think people even think about it anymore. It's just there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top