U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-24-2015, 01:38 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,943,432 times
Reputation: 18050

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertaWa View Post
What is the normal time frame to let your employer know you plan to retire? I would assume it is more than the usual 2 weeks people give when changing jobs.
Its really often a case of letting them know in time for all the paperwork and others involved like retirement to be notified.Ask HR.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-24-2015, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Chesapeake Bay
6,048 posts, read 3,872,797 times
Reputation: 3502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Would that were true. The state from which I retired wasn't sold, merged, reorgd, nor did it go out of business. Two weeks after I retired I was subpoenaed by a court to represent the state and my department in a civil matter. I required the state to bring me back in a retired annuitant status for liability purposes and reimbursement for my time and travel for the week long proceeding 91 miles away. For several months I also received calls and emails from various employees asking for information and guidance which I was happy to provide. Even now, six years later, some are in touch and still occasionally ask for some mentoring and assistance they don't seem to be able to get on the job now that I'm gone.

As part of my profession I wrote statutes and amendments to existing statutes and often testified before the legislature, all of which continues to have impact in several areas of law. To that degree I'd say I had a lasting impact and affect, both state and federal, as did my wife (same profession) on the state level.

Blanket statements just don't work well, do they?
True, gov't groups don't go out of business (hmmm, there is Kansas), etc but there can, are and will be . merges and reorgs. Nature of the beast.

Doing additional work after retirement - well, thats up to you. My answer is and has been - nope and good luck.

Really now. What do you care, none of it means anything to you any longer anyway. Or it shouldn't. You're retired, just let it be, move on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2015, 03:20 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weichert View Post
True, gov't groups don't go out of business (hmmm, there is Kansas), etc but there can, are and will be . merges and reorgs. Nature of the beast.

Doing additional work after retirement - well, thats up to you. My answer is and has been - nope and good luck.

Really now. What do you care, none of it means anything to you any longer anyway. Or it shouldn't. You're retired, just let it be, move on.
That's where you're wrong. I took pride in what I did, as did my wife. We still do. Knowing that some things we wrote, sponsored, worked and saw passed into law continue to benefit tens of millions of people is quite gratifying and satisfying. We cared then. Why would we not do so now? Not everything is ephemeral.

You got one part right. Having some minor involvement after retirement is in deed a personal choice, but for the subpoena. It's a pleasure and a few moments responding to a question is hardly taxing.

Did you ever hear of this strange, illusive thing known as a "calling" or a "passion?" To lack one or more, even when it comes to work, is rather tragic.

Last edited by Curmudgeon; 02-24-2015 at 03:30 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2015, 03:45 PM
 
4,574 posts, read 7,060,700 times
Reputation: 4222
I gave 5 months notice because I wanted everyone to know so I could take care of "business" out in the open.

The time went by very quickly and even though my employer didn't start the process until about 2-3 months before my official retirement date, I was glad that I could call with any questions I had in the meantime. I was part of the process for finding my replacement and I spent about 3 weeks training the new person. So I left feeling I had done all I could to ensure a smooth transition.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2015, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Chesapeake Bay
6,048 posts, read 3,872,797 times
Reputation: 3502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
That's where you're wrong. I took pride in what I did, as did my wife. We still do. Knowing that some things we wrote, sponsored, worked and saw passed into law continue to benefit tens of millions of people is quite gratifying and satisfying. We cared then. Why would we not do so now? Not everything is ephemeral.

Did you ever hear of this strange, illusive thing known as a "calling" or a "passion?" To lack one or more, even when it comes to work, is rather tragic.
Oh yes, I understand the "calling" or whatever you'd call it.

I was totally involved in one field - math - for more than 40 years. An obsession since high school, on thru graduate school. And did a lot of work and research in it.

But there does come a time to move on. It isn't that I don't miss it. I do tremendously. Still, I'd rather do other things today, things that I couldn't do then because of working compulsively 8-12 hours a day (sometimes 7 days a week) for years on end.

One thing that I wanted to do was just slow down, enjoy and lead a simple life. And that I've done. With a clean break from my former lifestyle. My family certainly appreciates it more today (so they say).

Satisfaction? Hmmm. I think that you'll eventually see my point.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2015, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weichert View Post
I don't think it really matters what length of notice that you give. Two weeks, two months - what difference does it make? Regardless of how you feel about the place, when you're gone you're gone. Nothing that you do or say before you leave will have any effect once you are out the door.

Companies are sold, merged, reorged, go out of business all the time. Go back for a visit a few years later, you won't recognize or even understand whats going on. Lots of people that you knew will be gone too.
People in this thread have been posting "what difference it makes" and now you appear in order to proclaim "What difference does it make?" Just because some companies/organizations drop the ball and fail to arrange for the proper training of a replacement doesn't mean that all companies/organizations are guilty of that. I for one would feel better knowing it wasn't MY fault if that ball was dropped.

And as far as radical change goes, once again, just because a lot of companies are "sold, merged, reorged, go out of business", not all of them do. I moved into my present home 14 years ago. At the time there was a large Ralph's supermarket within easy walking distance. It's still there - still looks the same both inside and out. Some of the stock locations have been re-arranged a bit and the hours have been cut from 24 hours to 20 hours (6 A.M. to 2 A.M.). But it's the same Ralphs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2015, 04:19 PM
 
671 posts, read 666,530 times
Reputation: 1245
Whatever time frame you feel comfortable with...I worked 2 years past my eligible retirement dated and gave 3 months notice...In my line of work that was customary. Still some folks give as little lead time for their exit date,,either way,,,your gone....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2015, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Chesapeake Bay
6,048 posts, read 3,872,797 times
Reputation: 3502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
People in this thread have been posting "what difference it makes" and now you appear in order to proclaim "What difference does it make?" Just because some companies/organizations drop the ball and fail to arrange for the proper training of a replacement doesn't mean that all companies/organizations are guilty of that. I for one would feel better knowing it wasn't MY fault if that ball was dropped.

And as far as radical change goes, once again, just because a lot of companies are "sold, merged, reorged, go out of business", not all of them do. I moved into my present home 14 years ago. At the time there was a large Ralph's supermarket within easy walking distance. It's still there - still looks the same both inside and out. Some of the stock locations have been re-arranged a bit and the hours have been cut from 24 hours to 20 hours (6 A.M. to 2 A.M.). But it's the same Ralphs.
I was thinking of IBM and HP when I wrote that. Two companies that have certainly dropped the ball in regards to the way they treat their employees today as compared to years past. Many think they are the same as they were. Well, the name is the same but thats about all. In fact, I wouldn't be at all surprised to see IBM fold sooner than later.

There are still good companies around. But a lot of them have changed over the past decade or so and not for the better.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2015, 05:23 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weichert View Post
Satisfaction? Hmmm. I think that you'll eventually see my point.
LOL! Good luck with that. If I spend an hour in any given week answering a question or two and giving some guidance, that a really busy week.

After decades of being on-call to various departments, agencies, the Legislature and the Governor's Office, this is a piece of cake and the occasional "calls of the wild" are a pleasant interlude. I had some marvelous employees and enjoy hearing from them even now. They we/are so much more than mere numbers. In the end I miss nothing.

And now I'm done with this!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2015, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
That's where you're wrong. I took pride in what I did, as did my wife. We still do. Knowing that some things we wrote, sponsored, worked and saw passed into law continue to benefit tens of millions of people is quite gratifying and satisfying. We cared then. Why would we not do so now? Not everything is ephemeral.

........

Did you ever hear of this strange, illusive thing known as a "calling" or a "passion?" To lack one or more, even when it comes to work, is rather tragic.
It's been a while since I have appreciated someone's post as much as this one! So often in this Retirement Forum, people write of their jobs with bitterness, as if the jobs had been jail sentences. Not that I think the people are lying, not at all, as they ought to know what their feelings about their former jobs are. But I, like you, think it "is rather tragic".

My job was not all sweetness and light. Some moments, some years even, were very stressful and I look back with amazement at some of the stuff I put up with and survived. Yet at the end of the day - looking back at the 34 years 10 years after leaving the full-time part behind - there is a deep satisfaction. People sometimes approach me in public - at a library, on the sidewalk, at a supermarket (people who have grown up and whom I no longer recognize by sight) - to say, "Aren't you Mr. Escort Rider? Didn't you used to teach at __________?" An elementary school teacher at a school where I volunteer came up and addressed me in French; she had been a student in my French class. Their expressions reflect a certain positive regard which has survived a lot of years. I'm not denying that some people hated my guts, but I suppose those do not speak to me upon recognition. LOL

"Not everything is ephemeral." Indeed. Today, when I was at one of the schools at which I volunteer, a senior came up to me and invited me to the graduation which is now about three months off. I had sort of mentored him when he was a sixth grader, and I was already retired (just a volunteer) at that time. That simple invitation bespoke a residue of positive feeling, and is the sort of reward that no money can buy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top