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Old 02-26-2015, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Near the In-n-Out
30 posts, read 27,838 times
Reputation: 53

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DH and I were planning for retirement in Spring 2016 but I had a Dr.'s appointment yesterday because my knee has been so bad lately (three sx's) and turns out I'm looking at a knee replacement, so everything just got pushed up. (Paired with a herniated disk I won't be returning to my job.)

It's such a weird feeling of being happy to retire but a little freaked out too.

I'm worried we won't have enough money even though we both have good pensions with full medical, a nice nest egg saved up, a small mortgage with no other debt, and no kids. We've been over the numbers with our financial planner of 25 years. FP and DH keep telling me that we'll be okay, but I'm a worrier by nature.

I've worked since I was a kid. My SS earnings hx goes back to when I was 16. I worked my way through college and never stopped! I had a part time business as well. We had no help from parents or family along the way. It's not that I don't have a lot of interests to keep me busy in retirement, it's that I've always had to work to pay the bills. I've always had to rely on myself. I think there's a little voice going, "How are you going to pay the bills if you're not working?"


How long did it take, if ever, for you to relax and not excessively worry about having enough money after you retired?


TIA!!
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Old 02-26-2015, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
1,886 posts, read 2,299,372 times
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I signed the retirement forms and officially retired on July 31, 2001. The company promised me a pension check every month for not working, so for the first 30 days of retirement I was a little nervous. When My first pension check arrived in my bank account I relaxed. Now every month there's the money in my account. So that first 30 days was the toughest.

It took another 5 months for the feeling that I need to go to work went away. Now 14 years later, retirement has become a very comfortable life style and I don't ever want to go to work again.
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Old 02-26-2015, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,354 posts, read 10,337,852 times
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I'd also worked my whole life, except one summer when I was 22 I went to Europe. Took a class for a month then explored for 2 months.

I'm not a worrier by nature and was so looking forward to time off. I'm still enjoying it.

I think your problem is in learning how to relax. You might try tai ji or yoga. Or tell yourself you're on vacation. One very long vacation.


after the surgery, take a trip some place. Maybe not a long distance-just some place different. If you live in a city, go to the country. Take classes. Keep your mind occupied so you don't have time to worry.
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Old 02-26-2015, 11:31 AM
 
4,574 posts, read 7,058,318 times
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are you old enough to qualify for Medicare? Have you been getting disability while working? Even with full medical I imagine you would have deductibles to cover for these surgeries?
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Old 02-26-2015, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Orlando
1,986 posts, read 2,635,623 times
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For the first five years of my retirement, my husband was alive and receiving a very generous pension check each month. I never worried about money in those days.

A year ago, he died, and the pension checks stopped. The end of the pension didn't surprise me; I knew it was going to happen. But this past year, learning to live on my own, with only SS and my investments to support me, has been very scary.

So I guess you could say I've only recently started worrying. Although I'm getting a better grip on my finances, I don't know if the worrying will ever stop.
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Old 02-26-2015, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
6,124 posts, read 9,079,067 times
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WSM: Can you go to SS and get more money based on hubbys SS? Widow's benefits or something like that? Maybe that would help.
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Old 02-26-2015, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Orlando
1,986 posts, read 2,635,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhxBarb View Post
WSM: Can you go to SS and get more money based on hubbys SS? Widow's benefits or something like that? Maybe that would help.
Thanks, Barb. I am receiving widow's benefits, i.e., the same amount my husband received before he died. I'm very glad he waited until full retirement age to start receiving his SS benefits.
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Old 02-26-2015, 09:42 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,922,814 times
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As to original question; you just need to do a intake versus what you put out for three months to see just where you stand. You might find spend more here and less there which is what we found.As far as the I should be working feeling and on Sunday evening of something you need to prepare for; it takes awhile. Good luck on health issues.
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Old 02-27-2015, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,682 posts, read 49,443,611 times
Reputation: 19129
I was nervous too. But as months go by, the money keeps showing up in my bank account every month. You do get used to it.

It is nice to have solid medical coverage. Last fall, they found that I had prostate cancer. It was an extremely aggressive one, we jumped right on it, and within 6 weeks of discovery I was in surgery having it removed. From later pathology, we learned if we had not gotten it then, it would have spread to lymph and bone cancer. My point is that it is important to have medical coverage and regular screenings. I never even had any symptoms. Now they are wanting to stop doing the blood test that screens for this cancer. I am so glad that I got screened. My co-pay? For the annual check-up, MRI, bone scan, biopsy, surgery, and after care, all of it came to $130.

I wish you luck with your new knee.
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Old 02-27-2015, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,888 posts, read 25,319,935 times
Reputation: 26382
I think everyone worries about this for a while. It's a temptation to never have enough and just die at work. Eventually we get up the nerve to take that first step and hopefully never look back. It will all work out because it has to. You do reach an expiration date where no one will hire you for real wages.
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