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Old 03-09-2014, 09:45 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,497,588 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tadwallace View Post
is southern texas good? houston area?
Probably not. Between air pollution and high humidity you likelyly wouldn't benefit.
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Old 05-02-2014, 12:17 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,526 times
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I live in the Colorado Rockies at 8,000 ft. elevation and wonder if moving to a lower elevation will truly make that much of a difference in the quality of life. I love these mountains and
sure hate the idea of leaving them.
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Old 05-02-2014, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Toronto, Ottawa Valley & Dunedin FL
1,409 posts, read 2,356,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by everydaywoman View Post
I live in the Colorado Rockies at 8,000 ft. elevation and wonder if moving to a lower elevation will truly make that much of a difference in the quality of life. I love these mountains and
sure hate the idea of leaving them.
I think only you or your doctor could really decide that. If you're used to that altitude, then perhaps it wouldn't. Why don't you do a visit somewhere lower and find out?
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Old 05-02-2014, 12:50 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,966,925 times
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Yep and be sure to visit certain times of year when highest problems. I just have mild allergies and dessert dry with dust and Pollen drove me crazy in Vegas in summer besides the exteme heat even by Texas standards,.Have friends who had problems in high winds there in March on allergies.
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Old 05-03-2014, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,747,361 times
Reputation: 32309
Default Trying to put things into perspective:

Quote:
Originally Posted by everydaywoman View Post
I live in the Colorado Rockies at 8,000 ft. elevation and wonder if moving to a lower elevation will truly make that much of a difference in the quality of life. I love these mountains and
sure hate the idea of leaving them.
Well, if you have severe emphysema, living at a lower elevation (other things being equal) would probably help your quality of life a great deal. You don't say if you already experience any difficulties with breathing or with mild exercise such as brisk walking.

8,000 feet elevation is considerable. Consider that the mean sea level air pressure world-wide is just less than 30 inches of mercury. The average decrease (at least in the lower portion of the atmosphere - say up to 15,000 feet) is about one inch of mercury per 1000 feet. So where you live the average barometric pressure would be somewhere on the order of 22 inches of mercury. That represents a 27 percent loss of air density.

Normal people in good health are not bothered by a sudden rise to 8,000 feet (which is, after all, not much higher than the cabin pressure altitudes of jetliners at their cruising altitudes), although they will notice they get out of breath much quicker. The difference is not negligible.
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Old 05-06-2014, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Tucson
4 posts, read 4,596 times
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I have Alpha-1 emphysema and moved to Az last year for the warm, dry climate ....but it has not been very good for me....blazing hot summer last year and dust blowing around, I am now thinking of leaving here soon !
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:03 AM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,628 posts, read 13,896,256 times
Reputation: 2770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skye Ford View Post
I have Alpha-1 emphysema and moved to Az last year for the warm, dry climate ....but it has not been very good for me....blazing hot summer last year and dust blowing around, I am now thinking of leaving here soon !
Try the land between the greatest of all fresh water in the world, Superior. Our climate is like no other and the air is filtered by so much salt free water that breathing such air truly does have healing powers.
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Old 05-08-2014, 06:13 PM
 
13,321 posts, read 25,574,131 times
Reputation: 20505
I have an 85-year-old friend with COPD who moved from 7500 feet to town, which is about 6000 and it was an improvement. She says when she visited family at sea level, she could absolutely feel the difference. Her sister at sea level (1,000 miles away) is at end of life and my friend is not interested in trying to start a new life at her age and condition and away from grandkids, so is slowly going downhill and suffering with it. It's a hard thing to see.
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Old 05-09-2014, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Dover, DE
1,802 posts, read 3,837,275 times
Reputation: 2499
Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
I don't know much about emphysema, but if you need to avoid airborn allergies the southeast is not a good place for you. Tree, grass, and mold allergies tend to be very bad here. The prediction is that it will get worse. If you need to avoid pollen, I would guess your best bet would be the beach areas of DelMarVa (Delaware, Md, and VA--with the least amount of pollen in Delaware).

I agree with normie. I currently live just about 10 miles south of Charlotte, NC and the humidity is terrible in the summer. And the allergens are even worse. I have had allergies all my life but they got twice as bad when we moved down here. There is a pine pollen during the month of May that lays a coat of yellow on everything. Even hubby, who never had an allergy in his life, has developed allergy type problems.
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Old 05-13-2014, 08:03 AM
 
2 posts, read 1,855 times
Reputation: 10
I also have Alpha 1. I live in the Central Texas area and do not recommend this region. Allergens, humidity, and pollution have wreaked havoc this winter. I imagine Houston is not much better. We are also looking for a better place to retire to in a year or so once the youngest has graduated from school.
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