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Old 05-14-2014, 06:19 PM
 
Location: it depends
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I know of a number of people with a variety of lung conditions who swear by the gulf coast--breathe better, feel better, even with humidity, compared to higher and more northern elevations.
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Old 05-15-2014, 06:42 AM
 
Location: State of Superior
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rothbear View Post
I agree with normie. I currently live just about 10 miles south of Charlotte, NC and the humidity is terrible in the summer. And the allergens are even worse. I have had allergies all my life but they got twice as bad when we moved down here. There is a pine pollen during the month of May that lays a coat of yellow on everything. Even hubby, who never had an allergy in his life, has developed allergy type problems.
I never could understand when those who DO have a choice , pick the hot and humid parts of NC. And SC. To retire or plant roots in, when the better life can be always found in the Mtns. .....and if that's not your cup of tea , at lest go to the "shore" as an alternative.

Truth be told , it's most often the case that the worst of living climate wise be found in the middle of any State. ( Ofcoarse there are exceptions namely where large bodies of water or higher elevations prevale )
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Old 05-15-2014, 10:12 AM
 
Location: State of Superior
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Originally Posted by marcopolo View Post
I know of a number of people with a variety of lung conditions who swear by the gulf coast--breathe better, feel better, even with humidity, compared to higher and more northern elevations.
" Northern Elevations " ?.....it depends more WHERE you are and not so much by latitude.Prevailing winds, pollution, surrounded by large bodies of water ( water filters the air ) have a greater effect.
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Old 05-15-2014, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,423 posts, read 21,267,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
Just make sure you have no problems with the dust in dry climates before moving as it drove me crazy in neveda and arizona with mild allergies.Never seen anything like it really.
I have COPD, but if you live in the desert you should always carry a mask with you, just in case the wind picks up as you don't want that fine dust flying into your lungs!

Here, in Las Vegas, it's essential as our average windspeeds in this city is 9.2MPH, and we can get winds blasting thru here at 60MPH, and if you're out that day, with no mask, you will suffer for days afterwards!
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Old 04-19-2015, 10:01 PM
 
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Default responding with a Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Traci1298 View Post
Actually, I have been a respiratory therapist for twelve years so breathing treatments are my specialty, emphysema and asthma are patient load daily.
I have also lived in VA and NC, the piedmont area is actually referred to Greensboro, Winston Salem, and Raleigh area also known as the Triad.
NC does not necessarily get alot of rain or no more than anywhere else, but it can get quite cold in the winter where you see the highs in the 30's and 40's for days and weeks at a time and lows in the 20's and sometimes as low as the teens in the coldest months of late December Jan and Feb.
I am not going to sugar coat it if you are going to pack up and move you need to know all the facts, I had some of my highest patient loads when I lived in VA and NC, some of my lowest and best controlled patients were when I lived in Colorado but as you said you are looking for wast coast. Actually, believe it or not I would recommend South Carolina over NC South Carolina has a much more controlled temperature and remains steady at those temps for days and weeks at a time, obviously you dont have to worry about the cold there and the summer in some parts are not that bad, during the hottest times of the days you simply stay indoors till it gets cooler in the evenings.
I live in southeast GA which is only a couple of miles from the FL border so dont come this far south the humidity is horrible for a healthy person let alone someone with breathing issues.
I hope this helps, feel free to ask me any other questions and I will do my best to answer them.
I have also heard the state of Texas and the middle states such as Kansas, Iowa, Indiana, AZ and several all in a row on the map would be well suited.
Hello , I live Tifton , Ga .I have copd . I am 58 . Been disabled with copd since I was 49 . I'm have o2 and using it is becoming more and more . I was told a place on the Beach fl . gulf coast area would be good for me to live . They said the saltwater breeze would make it easier to breathe ( especially in the early morning and late evenings ). What are your thoughts please .
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Old 04-20-2015, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Idaho
4,636 posts, read 4,479,613 times
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Fooled me again. I didn't realize how old this thread was, and I was responding to the OP.

Last edited by volosong; 04-20-2015 at 11:13 AM.. Reason: Should have checked the date of the OP first before responding.
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Old 04-23-2015, 12:33 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,628 posts, read 13,901,618 times
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It goes to show that there are a lot of people, more everyday looking for a better place, mostly it all revolves around climate. There was a time 100 years ago when so many were desperately looking for the best place to go for "the Cure". Many a big old wodden resort sprang up in the forested mountians all over America.Train service was of most inportance no one drove their cars such a great distance in most cases.Hust about any of those old resort towns will fit the bill, even today for those have lung problems. I agree many places are above 3,000 ft, so look for those that at lest have part of the property around 3,000 ft The western mtns. in NC are a good choice, areas like Highlands ( its 4100 ft. ) have a near perfect climate, at lest half the year more.Hot Springs, Asheville area, thats at 3,000 ft most fitting.The other thing is to be near a large body of water which will show lower pollutions ,. Combine the two and you will have the perfect place. In the midwest hands down its the upper land above the bridge in Michigan.Some like the Ozark's too even if they do get a bit hot in summer/ These areas are all below 2,000 ft, . Its still a long list.
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Old 04-23-2015, 04:10 PM
 
Location: southeast Wisconsin
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I want to throw in my 2 cents now that I have learned some things. First of all, I strongly recommend you visit the place you want to move to before you move there. So...here are some things I would ask myself.
(1) Temperature...does cold bother you, does heat bother you?
(2) Humidity...love it or hate it?
(3) Sunshine...need lots of it or are rainy days ok?
(4) Shopping...do you need to be near a lot of stores.
(5) Medical Care...check out the doctors and hospitals in the area.

Believe me, those things can make or break a move, depending on how you react to those above items. Let me tell you about our move. Last September my husband and I moved to the north coast of California and we love it! When I lived in northwest Indiana my lungs always hurt when I tried to take walks. Something was always bothering me...too cold in winter, too hot in summer, can't breath in the humidity, can't breath the industrial smoggy air. I spent so many years there I thought I would never get out. When we moved here I found I can take walks on any given day that isn't pouring rain and my lungs never hurt. We have abundant fresh air right off the ocean. *However* if you want to swim in the ocean, this area is not for you, it's too cool. If you want to sunbathe on the beach, it's too cool. If you want to shop at specialty stores, they are 90 miles away. We have a hospital here but some people prefer larger or more abundant facilities. Yes, we get sunshine. The climate is neither hot nor cold. We use the pellet stove much of the year. In this climate you must maintain a dry house. The pellet stove is an excellent source of efficient that does just that. We found out the hard way that my husband is severely allergic to mold when we were living in a damp house. Some people have chronic sinus problems here.
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Old 04-23-2015, 08:12 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,999,418 times
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Why not ask your specialist as they keep tabs no such things for their patients who have lung problems. I think right place in California except for present dryness dust and pollen from dessert) might be good as long as you avoid smog areas. Definitely a near or sea level area with higher oxygen content.
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Old 04-23-2015, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,423 posts, read 21,267,665 times
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If dryness was the one and only factor, then Las Vegas would be the city, with it barely receiving 4 inches of precip. a year, compared to Phoenix at 7-8 inches, and Tucson at 10-11 inches.

But what makes Las Vegas less desirable is the wind factor, 9.3MPH yearly average windspeeds, compared to Phoenix at 6.2MPH! But you pay a price for that, too, in more air pollution! Not enough wind to blow it away!

Medford, sounds quite ideal, in that it has the lowest average windspeed of any city in the country at 4.5MPH!

I'll be moving to Tucson soon, and we'll see how my COPD does down there, with the extra precipitation, and more humidity!
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