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Old 03-04-2015, 01:25 PM
 
8,840 posts, read 5,126,299 times
Reputation: 10096

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
A last note to the "You're Welcome" people...

I think they forget that those who came before them, paid for many of the things that made their lives what they were. If they went to public school, for instance, today's seniors paid for their schooling, as well as the roads they drove on, and the police who protected them, and the healthy water they drank out of the tap, on and on. And don't forget, all of us are still paying taxes - sales tax and gas tax, on and on.

So, for the nice American life you had growing up, with all of the above, you're welcome.

Well, maybe only the ones who aren't ungrateful.
Absolutely, well said.

Not to mention having won the lottery by being born in a country where you have opportunity to be financially successful. Not everyone is so fortunate.
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Old 03-04-2015, 01:41 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,475,774 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
A last note to the "You're Welcome" people...

I think they forget that those who came before them, paid for many of the things that made their lives what they were. If they went to public school, for instance, today's seniors paid for their schooling, as well as the roads they drove on, and the police who protected them, and the healthy water they drank out of the tap, on and on. And don't forget, all of us are still paying taxes - sales tax and gas tax, on and on.

So, for the nice American life you had growing up, with all of the above, you're welcome.

Well, maybe only the ones who aren't ungrateful.
Regrettably I can't rep you again. I love a feisty woman! Very well put, NMSFM. I hope some are humble enough to pay heed.
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Old 03-04-2015, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,436 posts, read 2,760,875 times
Reputation: 16350
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcopolo View Post
"Oh please?" No word or thought of mine implied what you assumed. I sincerely said "You're welcome" because I am personally paying lots and lots of rent and food and medical care for many people who are unable to do so for themselves.

And I would rather be doing that, rather be paying very large taxes, because that means I am doing well. I appreciate my health, my sympathies go to those with physical and mental health challenges.

What I do not like is when people assume I somehow have my boot on the necks of the poor because I have been useful to the rest of society, which pays me well for the value I provide.

You're welcome.
As one of the poor, I don't take any offense at what you said. You can be rich and still have compassion and the fact is, I'd rather be rich and be paying more in taxes myself than in the situation I am in now. However, I'm sure someone will then assume that just because I am rich, I am also putting my boots on the neck of the poor, which would definitely not be the case.

You know what I like about hearing rain on the roof? It means you're sheltered inside. The fact that I would have to pay a large amount of taxes and was able to comfortably do so, would also indicate to me I was doing well and probably significantly better than a lot of the rest of the population. That wouldn't make me feel smug. It would make me feel grateful, which is what I think Marcopolo meant to convey.
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Old 03-04-2015, 02:01 PM
 
685 posts, read 564,434 times
Reputation: 1004
Quote:
Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
That's true in California. My sis and bro-in-law are on disability but don't qualify for SNAP because they own their home.
Since SNAP is for low income, you can be on it and own a home. Neighbors have a 90 some odd year father who needed to get into an assisted living home. They told our friends to put money into the house (the father's money) and fix it up to legally spend down money. That allowed the father to be on Medicaid (income-based) and stay in the facility. All I ever heard was you can't magically get rid of income because it will be tracked but they did it here.

There are two kinds of disability: SSI (income-based) and SSDI (not income based but disability based). On SSDI, you can have a house and modest income (low to me). If you go over a specifically-defined earning amount on SSDI, you may have to repay SS. My guess is your sis and bro-in-law are on SSDI and that would explain why they can't be on SNAP.
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Old 03-04-2015, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,088 posts, read 22,943,598 times
Reputation: 35213
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
It would make me feel grateful, which is what I think Marcopolo meant to convey.
Nah. Only people who think of themselves as the "great benefactor" say to people who didn't say thank you - "You're welcome." In that situation, it implies that the person who didn't say "thank you" is being ungrateful, which of course means that they have been given something that they took for granted by the "great benefactor."

Now, if I worked hard on a dinner and handed a plate to someone who didn't say thank you, I might say "You're welcome!" That would imply that they had bad manners.

Nobody blurts out "you're welcome" to someone who didn't say "thank you," without it being some type of admonition.

In my ever-so-Irish opinion.
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Old 03-04-2015, 02:02 PM
 
8,840 posts, read 5,126,299 times
Reputation: 10096
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
As one of the poor, I don't take any offense at what you said. You can be rich and still have compassion and the fact is, I'd rather be rich and be paying more in taxes myself than in the situation I am in now. However, I'm sure someone will then assume that just because I am rich, I am also putting my boots on the neck of the poor, which would definitely not be the case.

You know what I like about hearing rain on the roof? It means you're sheltered inside. The fact that I would have to pay a large amount of taxes and was able to comfortably do so, would also indicate to me I was doing well and probably significantly better than a lot of the rest of the population. That wouldn't make me feel smug. It would make me feel grateful, which is what I think Marcopolo meant to convey.
Nonsense. There was discussion earlier about people who pop out of the woodwork to tell those receiving some form of assistance "You're welcome". Several people said they found it mean-spirited and rude. And then along comes Marcopolo to chime in and illustrate exactly what they meant.

Color me unimpressed.
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Old 03-04-2015, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,436 posts, read 2,760,875 times
Reputation: 16350
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I wanted to ask what people think will happen to people who don't have enough money to retire?

Seriously.

What do you think will happen to them?

Is there a posse that rounds them up in the dead of night and throws them in a river?

Do they get mysteriously sent to the "Place Where People Don't Have Enough To Retire" go? Where is that place? Do they feed them?

There is all this fear spread around, and I can't help but wonder if it isn't financial planners and insurance salesmen who perpetuate this fear. And of course, the answer is to buy what they are selling!

But, really, maybe I should start a thread - what is it you think will happen to you if you don't have "enough" money to retire on?

Seriously. Please list what happens. In detail. Specifically.
Right now, I have a room I rent in subsidized housing which is nice, except for the shared bathroom, which is horrible. I also receive food stamps. I think my annual income is about $2400 a year. I pay my rent, my car insurance, and my computer connection so I have something to do besides stare at 4 walls all day (I'm not very social). My mother has told me she's left us kids something in her will and it should be enough for me to buy a trailer in a trailer park, or a small piece of land in the boonies, or to pay for a van to convert so I can live in it. I've lived in my truck before and to be honest, it was a pain in the patootie, but it's preferable to having roommates or being in a landlocked apartment that I can't fix up the way I want.

Meantime, I am waiting to hear about disability. They turned me down at the first hearing (which I understand they do to everyone), and a year later, we're still waiting to hear about the appeal. As there are several appeals and if each one takes a year or more, I may be appealing until I'm 62, at which point I turn totally ugly. OK, that was a joke. At 62, I will retire. Retirement or disability, either one will give me about $700 a month. The best I can hope for is that I will be able to find a nice low income apartment and live there for a while. I just finished applying for Section 8. They opened Section 8 last Monday for the first time in years. My mom said when they opened Section 8 in her area, they had over 200,000 applicants. I have no idea how many applicants there are here in my city, but Section 8 is not something I am counting on.

I'm planning on living a long healthy life, aside from the aneurysm I had. My mom is 85 and still walks a mile a day. Her brothers are all in their 90s. Her older sister just died at 100. My grandmother on the other side lived to be 96. But if for any reason I become disabled enough to have to go into a nursing home, I will consider suicide. I can't think of anything I would loath more than to be in an institution and have to share a room with somebody else. So I will attempt to remain independent even if I have to crawl to the bathroom and back.

Yeah, all that's probably not a good plan, but that's what I've got.
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Old 03-04-2015, 02:43 PM
 
Location: SoCal
6,064 posts, read 9,526,027 times
Reputation: 5789
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaceOut001 View Post
Since SNAP is for low income, you can be on it and own a home. Neighbors have a 90 some odd year father who needed to get into an assisted living home. They told our friends to put money into the house (the father's money) and fix it up to legally spend down money. That allowed the father to be on Medicaid (income-based) and stay in the facility. All I ever heard was you can't magically get rid of income because it will be tracked but they did it here.

There are two kinds of disability: SSI (income-based) and SSDI (not income based but disability based). On SSDI, you can have a house and modest income (low to me). If you go over a specifically-defined earning amount on SSDI, you may have to repay SS. My guess is your sis and bro-in-law are on SSDI and that would explain why they can't be on SNAP.
I don't know which of those two they are on. I do know that one is for people who have worked but are now unable to work due to disability, and the other is for people who were never able to work. They've been on disability for most of their lives. But, they have worked (special arrangement with the employers). So I don't know into which group they fall.

But as for the discrepancy in what's allowed, my guess would be that you aren't in their state and/or county, and the rules are different where you are. The rules aren't uniform everywhere in the USA, and possibly aren't uniform even within the state since at least some benefits are handled on county-by-county basis.
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Old 03-04-2015, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,088 posts, read 22,943,598 times
Reputation: 35213
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
Right now, I have a room I rent in subsidized housing which is nice, except for the shared bathroom, which is horrible. I also receive food stamps. I think my annual income is about $2400 a year. I pay my rent, my car insurance, and my computer connection so I have something to do besides stare at 4 walls all day (I'm not very social). My mother has told me she's left us kids something in her will and it should be enough for me to buy a trailer in a trailer park, or a small piece of land in the boonies, or to pay for a van to convert so I can live in it. I've lived in my truck before and to be honest, it was a pain in the patootie, but it's preferable to having roommates or being in a landlocked apartment that I can't fix up the way I want.

Meantime, I am waiting to hear about disability. They turned me down at the first hearing (which I understand they do to everyone), and a year later, we're still waiting to hear about the appeal. As there are several appeals and if each one takes a year or more, I may be appealing until I'm 62, at which point I turn totally ugly. OK, that was a joke. At 62, I will retire. Retirement or disability, either one will give me about $700 a month. The best I can hope for is that I will be able to find a nice low income apartment and live there for a while. I just finished applying for Section 8. They opened Section 8 last Monday for the first time in years. My mom said when they opened Section 8 in her area, they had over 200,000 applicants. I have no idea how many applicants there are here in my city, but Section 8 is not something I am counting on.

I'm planning on living a long healthy life, aside from the aneurysm I had. My mom is 85 and still walks a mile a day. Her brothers are all in their 90s. Her older sister just died at 100. My grandmother on the other side lived to be 96. But if for any reason I become disabled enough to have to go into a nursing home, I will consider suicide. I can't think of anything I would loath more than to be in an institution and have to share a room with somebody else. So I will attempt to remain independent even if I have to crawl to the bathroom and back.

Yeah, all that's probably not a good plan, but that's what I've got.
Do you have a SS disability lawyer to handle your appeal? If not, get one. They can only charge you a small percentage of your back pay if you get it, by federal law. You can find one here: NOSSCR That's where I found mine.

It sounds like you're best to stay where you are until you get your SS disability. Did the Section 8 application info say how long you can expect to be on the list before you are approved? You will get a higher placement on the list once you are determined to be disabled, and if you live locally, that is another priority point.

If the list is too long, you might want to investigate other places where the wait time is shorter. But, even after you get your disability, you can apply for any 55+ subsidized apartment's waiting list anywhere. The rent depends on where you live. For example, I moved to Redding, CA from the SF Bay Area, because the cheapest place in my old town was around $700/month. In Redding, it was $350. I moved to Redding because it was cheaper, and the Section 8 list was open.

Redding was too hot, so I moved to Crescent City, CA where the rent for a smaller apartment was $335, and the Section 8 list was open here, too. I just got my Section 8 voucher, and now my rent is $197. My SSI income is $889, which includes a subsidy for food, instead of food stamp money.

You can sit around feeling sorry for yourself, or you can use the internet to check out your other options. And know that your current situation is temporary.

Start with contacting the NOSSCR via the link above and getting an attorney. You should have a lot of back pay in a year or so. See about depression counseling (I got some when I was waiting for my SSI and it helped a lot to get me to start looking ahead and checking out my options), and I also know the weather in WA was really depressing for me. Consider moving somewhere else, after you get your disability, unless you're in love with WA or have other reasons to stay there.

Attitude is everything. I've been in your shoes. And I also thought all was lost because I couldn't afford to live in the SF Bay Area close to my daughter and other friends. If you can get over having to go a different route, you might even end up happy. I wish you the best.
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Old 03-04-2015, 04:04 PM
 
11,932 posts, read 20,383,027 times
Reputation: 19328
I pay a lot in taxes. I pay MORE in health insurance.... but that's not the point. those taxes pay for OUR roads, OUR police, OUR fire department, OUR library and OUR other assistance programs.

Because, let's face it, all sorts of these things are assistance, whether it's asking a librarian for help, or asking for an ambulance or asking for the police, or applying for SNAP.... it's all assistance.

Pretty much EVERYBODY uses these things. No man is an island people....
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