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Old 03-05-2015, 04:41 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,492,863 times
Reputation: 29076

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
thats what makes us all unique and not cookie cutter.
Well now, if we're all unique then why are we all supposed to wait until 70 to retire whether or not we can or want to at an earlier age?
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Old 03-05-2015, 04:49 AM
 
4,173 posts, read 2,939,402 times
Reputation: 2629
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogie'smom View Post
The taxes I paid, and pay now, didn't just go to help others. A percentage did, with my full knowledge, but as someone said above, I also sent my children to public schools, drove on the highways, etc, etc. I also reaped the benefits of the taxes I paid.

I pay sales tax (nearly 10% and that includes groceries) and I paid property taxes before I sold my home, and other taxes that I can't think of. I pay a big chunk of tax on my phone bill. I do complain about that one. My husband and I both paid FICA all of our working lives. He is dead and I collect a small part of what we would have collected together if he had lived. Neither one of us used Medicare.

It is irritating to me when someone claims to be paying my way or assumes they will have to pay my way because they pay taxes. Look at many of the threads that talk about insurance and LTC. You will find someone popping up to say that they will end up paying for me because they made wise choices, worked, and paid their taxes.

If I resented paying taxes that much, I'd be working under the table and growing my own food.

And its not funny* and it is painful to be called a burden on society, or to be disabled and have someone question the legitimacy of your claim.


*need to say here that I realize a good many of my own jokes are not funny
I do not disagree with your points. I consider myself fortunate not to have the need of public assistance or be disabled. I do not resent my tax dollars going to help others.

But, for the most part it is a zero sum game. In order for some to reap benefits, others must pay in surplus. We all enjoy the benefit of public roads and schools, but some certainly take more than they give and it is not a terrible thing to suggest they be somewhat appreciative. I put one child through public school, some put none through and others several children. Clearly there are those who are "subsidized" and those who subsidize them.

If a person is subsidized by no fault or choice of their own then one should be magnanimous. If, they just acted in an irresponsible fashion, well that is another thing entirely. Nonetheless some of us pay our way and pay for others, and some need help. Pretending that is not so, seems disingenuous.

I might add, I am not talking about FICA or Medicare here. I support both programs. Maybe I'll even get a bit of that gravy eventually too!
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Old 03-05-2015, 04:56 AM
 
4,173 posts, read 2,939,402 times
Reputation: 2629
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
but by the same token many situations were the result of poor choices and bad decisions in life . it wasn't the final act that did these folks in but their own choices leading up to it.

how many who ended up being disabled before full retirement had cell phones , cable tv , drove new cars instead of private disability insurance that pays 80% of their salary until fra before they had any issues surfacing ?

no need to tell us about the exceptions , of course they exist . but the fact is many situations while they appear random and unavoidable were just the result of choice's made earlier.
Yes, and no one begrudges the mentally handicapped person a humane standard of living. The guy who ended up on disability for doing things he knew would backfire is another story entirely. Either way though, some give more, some take more. Acknowledging that fact is not necessarily inappropriate.
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Old 03-05-2015, 04:58 AM
 
4,173 posts, read 2,939,402 times
Reputation: 2629
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Well now, if we're all unique then why are we all supposed to wait until 70 to retire whether or not we can or want to at an earlier age?
You can retire any time you want. I wouldn't expect your fellow taxpayers to chip in voluntarily though.
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Old 03-05-2015, 05:14 AM
 
71,643 posts, read 71,777,271 times
Reputation: 49240
Quote:
Originally Posted by curmudgeon View Post
well now, if we're all unique then why are we all supposed to wait until 70 to retire whether or not we can or want to at an earlier age?
all ? You can't find any time i ever said that. All is never the case. EVEN I AM NOT WAITING UNTIL 70.
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Old 03-05-2015, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,692 posts, read 33,700,331 times
Reputation: 51915
Quote:
Originally Posted by ByeByeLW View Post
If I retire now, I can exist. But if I stay another 2 or 3 years, then I'll probably be able to travel and buy some camera equipment and gadgets I can't help wanting. These will have to be very frugal years.
As another person with a camera hobby I can tell you that even though there is the initial cost for the equipment and software, you can take photos every day in retirement and not spend a dime on your hobby activity except maybe for gasoline. Compare that to bowling or going to museums, for example, where you have to pay every time you do your hobby. Also, I don't travel except by car, and I can tell you I had 4 photos that placed in a recent annual salon and 3 of the 4 were taken in my town (one second place finisher was taken around the corner from where I live) and the 4th was taken in the state, about an hour and a half from where I live. Those photos competed with photos taken in other countries from camera club members that travel extensively.

Point being, once you have your equipment, you can do your photography hobby cheaply and effectively in retirement and still take great photos without jumping on a plane and spending big bucks for lodging, touring, eating and expensive venues plus, you never have to dress up. Where I live, for example, there are free state parks, a free national park, a free arboretum in town, free university gardens in the next town, free mountains, lakes and rivers. You can go from rural to city settings in an hour. You can hit 4 different states in "no-overnights" trips.

I know you can want to travel in retirement and that does cost money. I just want you to consider that you don't have to travel, for your photography hobby to be enjoyable, frequent, competitive and cheap.
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Old 03-05-2015, 06:00 AM
 
5,467 posts, read 2,927,038 times
Reputation: 24553
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I love your post. My theory is, as you suggested, that most people who are not rich are afraid to admit it because they don't want to be bashed. I've seen it happen too many times. Someone will come on and ask for help with subsidized housing or how to get Medicaid and people attack them instead of helping them. Some people just never learned good manners, it seems.

Then there are the people who come here merely to brag--about their homes (that are usually too huge for them and they will probably live to regret), or all their expensive cars or luxurious vacations or expensive possessions. It's one thing to mention it in passing as a necessary part of the conversation but to make it center stage can be hurtful to those who do not have as much and can make it daunting for the less fortunate to post about their own lives.

Back when I worked in a public library there was a book called, "When Bad Things Happen to Good People." I never read it but this topic made me think of it. Most of the time when someone retires and is not wealthy, it is due to illness, divorce, job loss, or other instances beyond their control. Leave it to the bullies to beat them when they are down. Thanks for your honesty, NoMoreSnowForMe.
I loved her post too. And I love yours.

I did read that book. It was a good book.

I am only 57 and worry if I will have enough when I retire. Scary.
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Old 03-05-2015, 07:27 AM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,876,173 times
Reputation: 11705
I suspect that one of the reasons we have such a divide on this topic is that retirement planning is as aspirational(Aspirational | Define Aspirational at Dictionary.com) as we want it to be. We can all dream and aspire to lofty goals and accomplishments or we can choose not to. Many aspire to what they might consider to be a more realistic set of goals. Not every college athlete wants to turn pro. The path to that level is full of challenge and potential road blocks and most importantly a lot of time and effort above what most might put in. Those who reach that level feel great by that success when they get there. As they reflect back on their success they pride themselves on the time and effort they put in and also realize there were those who didn't make it because of injury and those because they didn't put in the work they did. You can imagine how they react differently to the two groups.

WE ALL have/had a different level of life aspirations. Many with high aspirations feel they fell short even if they soar over most. Being nominated for the Academy Award and winning can emotionally be very different I suspect. Many here translated their retirement lifestyle goals into a working plan that they hoped would take them to where they aspired to be. Many implemented that plan but faced roadblocks along the way that derailed their commitment and effort. Others had a another set of reasons that got them to retirement. We should not take away the pride and success of those who aspired big and are not there, nor should we expect them to look at those with lesser aspirations the same way. If they do great if they don't chalk it up to normal human reaction.

My suggestion to those on the path to retirement is to dream big and aspire high and let that propel you forward. Reality may cause your path to detour but always aspire as high as you want as your eventual retirement will become not aspiration but reality.

For my good friend MathJak remember not everyone aspired to your goals and millions who didn't are perfectly happy with their reality as it was what they wanted. Just like not every college athlete want to turn pro and be a star. Lots of happy people retired before age 70 as he and others plan to do. In fact part of the aspiration package for many is to retire before age 60 and they are happy as a bug in a rug.
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Old 03-05-2015, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,744,100 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
I suspect that one of the reasons we have such a divide on this topic is that retirement planning is as aspirational(Aspirational | Define Aspirational at Dictionary.com) as we want it to be. We can all dream and aspire to lofty goals and accomplishments or we can choose not to. Many aspire to what they might consider to be a more realistic set of goals. Not every college athlete wants to turn pro. The path to that level is full of challenge and potential road blocks and most importantly a lot of time and effort above what most might put in. Those who reach that level feel great by that success when they get there. As they reflect back on their success they pride themselves on the time and effort they put in and also realize there were those who didn't make it because of injury and those because they didn't put in the work they did. You can imagine how they react differently to the two groups.

WE ALL have/had a different level of life aspirations. Many with high aspirations feel they fell short even if they soar over most. Being nominated for the Academy Award and winning can emotionally be very different I suspect. Many here translated their retirement lifestyle goals into a working plan that they hoped would take them to where they aspired to be. Many implemented that plan but faced roadblocks along the way that derailed their commitment and effort. Others had a another set of reasons that got them to retirement. We should not take away the pride and success of those who aspired big and are not there, nor should we expect them to look at those with lesser aspirations the same way. If they do great if they don't chalk it up to normal human reaction.

My suggestion to those on the path to retirement is to dream big and aspire high and let that propel you forward. Reality may cause your path to detour but always aspire as high as you want as your eventual retirement will become not aspiration but reality.

For my good friend MathJak remember not everyone aspired to your goals and millions who didn't are perfectly happy with their reality as it was what they wanted. Just like not every college athlete want to turn pro and be a star. Lots of happy people retired before age 70 as he and others plan to do. In fact part of the aspiration package for many is to retire before age 60 and they are happy as a bug in a rug.
Your civility and your good will are a welcome breath of fresh air. What a contrast to those who publicly embrace their own nastiness and hostility.
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Old 03-05-2015, 07:54 AM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,876,173 times
Reputation: 11705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Your civility and your good will are a welcome breath of fresh air. What a contrast to those who publicly embrace their own nastiness and hostility.
TY, a thought I might add is that MathJak and Mad Man better known as MOB do and have provided inspiration to many folks aspiration. I know MOB had a positive impact on me years ago. More than he realizes. We were on a comparable time table and similar outcome and he helped shore up my confidence in my attitude. While MJ and I have different retirement pictures he has helped give me great confidence and a sense of blessing in our post retirement. Take that back I have since been reminded he retired two years after me and reinforced things. Dang this age thing.

Last edited by TuborgP; 03-05-2015 at 09:21 AM..
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