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Old 03-17-2015, 08:25 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
12,764 posts, read 7,823,323 times
Reputation: 13083

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Quote:
Originally Posted by modhatter View Post
Even heard some people talking about living in a 600+ sq. ft house.
LOL, my house is 620 SF!

It was fine for my daughter and me; two bedrooms and one bath. For a year my middle daughter and her husband lived with me after a fire destroyed just about everything they owned. THAT was pretty squished!

Now it's just me, since my youngest bought her own house. 620 SF is fine; I turned one of the bedrooms into the 'TV' room so the living room is now just a room I walk through to get to the kitchen!

The only complaint I have is the kitchen is way too small.

One good thing; I bought it 17 years ago for $70k and was appraised fairly recently for $258k.

When I bought the house, the RE agent described it as 'barely livable'. Hey, the electric worked; the plumbing worked; the heater worked; what more does anyone need? haha
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Old 03-17-2015, 09:38 AM
 
8,849 posts, read 5,129,939 times
Reputation: 10118
Tiny house communities can work, they just take some planning.

11 Tiny House Villages Redefining Home - Shareable
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Old 03-17-2015, 09:39 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,479,691 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fox Terrier View Post
LOL, my house is 620 SF!

It was fine for my daughter and me; two bedrooms and one bath. For a year my middle daughter and her husband lived with me after a fire destroyed just about everything they owned. THAT was pretty squished!

Now it's just me, since my youngest bought her own house. 620 SF is fine; I turned one of the bedrooms into the 'TV' room so the living room is now just a room I walk through to get to the kitchen!

The only complaint I have is the kitchen is way too small.

One good thing; I bought it 17 years ago for $70k and was appraised fairly recently for $258k.

When I bought the house, the RE agent described it as 'barely livable'. Hey, the electric worked; the plumbing worked; the heater worked; what more does anyone need? haha
Good for you. There's nothing at all wrong with being a minimalist. You seem to be not just making do but enjoying it as well. Such comfort and contentment are nice to see.
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Old 03-17-2015, 10:38 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,753 posts, read 7,033,290 times
Reputation: 14280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
Well, the government never handed him any marketable job skills nor any decent paying jobs. Can you believe the unfairness of that?
LOL, the gubmint never handed me ( or anyone else I ever knew) any marketable skills or decent paying jobs either. Despite what the current occupant of the white house has said, ie, "You didn't build that....."
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Old 03-17-2015, 11:20 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
12,764 posts, read 7,823,323 times
Reputation: 13083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Good for you. There's nothing at all wrong with being a minimalist. You seem to be not just making do but enjoying it as well. Such comfort and contentment are nice to see.
Absolutely! Who wants to keep a 3,000 SF house clean?! Cleaning is like food shopping; it has to be done over and over and over.....blah!

Yep, I WOULD love for my kitchen to be bigger (it's only 9' x 9'), but I recently created a spot in it for a very small table and two chairs, so that's good now!
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Old 04-02-2015, 05:29 AM
 
761 posts, read 638,090 times
Reputation: 2229
Default Agreed!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerGeek40 View Post
Yeah, work until you are 70. Great plan. Then die at 72.
No thanks.

Here's my plan: Retire early, keep costs down, and enjoy your life a little.

I am with you.

My brother-in-law died a few years back from bladder cancer at the age of 65.
Left behind a wife, 2 adult children and some young grandkids.

Never got a chance to retire.
This is a life lesson for me and I take it to heart.
He was a good guy, had a ton of friends that loved and cared for him and truly had a full life.

His sister, my wife (soon to be ex), is a born workaholic and I can see her keeling over at her desk some day ay the age of 80, trying to get that last report out. She already had a mini-nervous breakdown a few years ago.

I will have to make my own way, alone and with no family and few friends, but I don't intend to work myself to death, either. I see so many articles written by experts telling us we really should work to 70 or even 75. I am tired now and just can't see that happening.
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Old 04-02-2015, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,735,102 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by elliotgb View Post
I am with you.

My brother-in-law died a few years back from bladder cancer at the age of 65.
Left behind a wife, 2 adult children and some young grandkids.

Never got a chance to retire.
This is a life lesson for me and I take it to heart.
He was a good guy, had a ton of friends that loved and cared for him and truly had a full life.

His sister, my wife (soon to be ex), is a born workaholic and I can see her keeling over at her desk some day ay the age of 80, trying to get that last report out. She already had a mini-nervous breakdown a few years ago.

I will have to make my own way, alone and with no family and few friends, but I don't intend to work myself to death, either. I see so many articles written by experts telling us we really should work to 70 or even 75. I am tired now and just can't see that happening.
I can see both sides of this. I retired early at age 61 ten years ago and I'm SO glad I was able to do that. I agree that for most people, the thought of working until 70 or 75 is pretty grim, although some like their jobs enough and are in good health so more power to them. (One can have liked one's job, can have been happy doing it, and can ALSO be happy to be retired and enjoying retirement).

On the other hand, basing decisions on the fear of an early death seems a bit odd to me, absent any medical condition pointing in that direction. The example of your brother-in-law can be considered a statistical outlier, as most people do not die that young. One example is one example, although I can understand it being a cautionary tale for you, being that it struck so close to home.

Now, still healthy and active at age 71, I am very pleased not to have to scrimp and live on a shoestring, which would have been the case if I had retired at, say, age 55 instead of 61. (And, as stated, I still consider 61 "early"). Financially, we all have different tipping points; the way my pension is structured, the difference between age 55 and age 61 is enormous. I don't see how other pension systems can afford to give ultra-generous pensions to people at age 55, but that would be a subject for a separate thread.
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Old 04-02-2015, 09:12 AM
 
950 posts, read 714,675 times
Reputation: 1615
I have had a few friends that never wanted to retire for two reasons..........
#1.....they were greedy ( always talking about how great it was to draw SS and a full paycheck )
#2.....they believed their services were need so much by their employer and that they were the most valuable employee

Surprise, surprise............one day the boss calls them in and asks them if they are thinking of retirement soon ( mid 70's) because their job performance has dropped so much their position must be filled by some one else who is more productive.

Then the anger sets in !
The employee retires ( or is shown the door) and for a year or so all they talk about is how ungrateful their employer was after they gave him 40+ years.

Know when to retire !

Even athletes are so nave they think they are so needed in their later years until they are cut for poor performance.

I know, all you posters will state I am not talking about you because your skills and performance has gotten better every year and you are better at your job in your mid 70's than ever before.

Three of my friends said the same.
Their employer knew that was not true and did I but they themselves could not see it and had to be shown the door.

Very humiliating after all those good years to hang on until you area burden to your employer.
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Old 04-02-2015, 10:57 AM
 
4,574 posts, read 7,058,318 times
Reputation: 4222
this is just my opinion, people who think they will be wanted by an employer at 70 (no less 75) are really kidding themselves. I'm talking non-government jobs here. Yes, there are exceptions but very few. Of course, work as long as you want, but be prepared for them to give you the nudge at any time when they realize you aren't going to go by yourself.
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Old 04-09-2015, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Central NY
4,668 posts, read 3,243,341 times
Reputation: 11946
I've had a couple of retirements. Not my choice, however. First, worked for a large corporation, applied for a job in another state with this company, was hired, got there, the job was suddenly unavailable. I was 53. Lesson: don't be gullible. Get everything in writing. Moved back "home" one year later (lived off savings and profit from sale of home). Took classes to learn another skill. Worked at that for about 11 years. Received an "employee of the month" award and one month later told I was not doing a good job and had to go. I was 64. Worked for another company doing same work for 3+ years, had to leave for eye surgery. So any way you look at it, my SS and pension from the first company took a real beating and I receive a lot less than I would have had I retired from first company at 65. I'm now 73 and have learned to live on what I have. Yes, there are times I kick myself for moving from first job in Syracuse but then I realize in a way if that had not happened, I would not have met some of the people I met and am still friends with. Money is not everything; if there is enough to pay your monthly bills and have low-cost fun, it isn't too bad. Most of my long-time friends from the first company retired extremely well. Yes, sometimes I feel jealous. But for the most part I am doing OK.
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