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Old 03-01-2015, 09:20 PM
 
2,421 posts, read 3,721,370 times
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When anyone typically posts anything about having enough to retire on, it appears everyone on this board has enough, whether through pensions, double social security checks or larger portfolios. Yet statistically, many more people do not have enough to retire.

So how is it we never hear from them? Does the subject matter of this forum "Retirement" only attract people who are in a position to retire? Are there not people on here who would like to retire, but feel they can't? Are they afraid to speak up, or are they just not interested in the subject matter so they never come on this forum?
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Old 03-01-2015, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,081 posts, read 22,914,959 times
Reputation: 35192
You must just be missing them. I've posted that I'm on SSI and retired on a very limited income. I am in a subsidized senior apartment that is a very tiny studio. I have Medi-Cal, and have a great dog, and moved to the northern-most town on the coast of CA, where it is very affordable, and I can now walk to the ocean, and drive to the redwood forest just 7 miles away.

I can't afford to go out to eat, or travel. But, I don't need to. The trick is to get over not being able to have the retirement of your dreams. Once I accepted the limits of my budget, I'm actually quite happy with what I have. And I think it's important for seniors to know that there is a lot of subsidized senior housing out there, and my experience so far in two senior subsidized apartment buildings in two different lower COL towns in CA, is that they are very well-maintained and safe. They are inspected by the government agencies that fund them, and they make sure we're in a safe and well-maintained place.

If you get on the waiting lists, eventually you will get called. You might not be able to live in the city of your dreams, because of the COL or length of the waiting lists. But, if you can get over that, too (I originally hoped to live in the SF Bay Area, but couldn't make that work), and you're flexible, you can find somewhere nice. It turns out I love it here, where I finally ended up. And I'm already making friends.

I became disabled, so retired early. But, if people want to retire early, and they can change their idea of how much is enough, they can do it. It's hard to let go of a vision of retirement you've had for many years.

At any rate, poor retirees can be happy, too. You just need to accept what you can't change and change the things you can, and once you get the best situation you can, be happy with what you've got.

You see, I'm pretty broke, but I can choose every day whether to walk my dog by the ocean or in the redwood forest. Today we walked by the ocean. I also took some stuff to sell at the flea market and chatted with interesting people all day, and sold home-made muffins and some other junk I had. Came home and took the dog for a walk by the ocean and chatted with some cute kids who were collecting shells.

I consider myself to be lucky, now. But, I had to let go of being able to live near my daughter in the SF Bay Area. You don't get to have everything you want, but you can still have it pretty good.
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Old 03-01-2015, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,723,738 times
Reputation: 32304
To Modhatter: There have been a number of posters who have mentioned that they are going to have to work until they drop, or work until age 70, or have made similar statements. But I don't remember any user names because, indeed, they are not the "regulars" here, instead forming a small minority of posters. (Oops, I just remembered a user name, a young - compared to most of us regulars - burger flipper).

You have raised an interesting question to which I don't have any answer. Perhaps the financially more secure have the time and inclination to frequent public internet discussion forums in greater numbers? Or perhaps you are right that the ones who cannot retire are embarrassed about it and so don't speak up? It will be interesting to see if the responses to your original post shed light on the matter.
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Old 03-01-2015, 09:41 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,880,155 times
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My guess is because its a retirement forum. It attracts retired and people wanting to ask question about retirement.
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Old 03-01-2015, 10:25 PM
 
2,421 posts, read 3,721,370 times
Reputation: 3455
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
My guess is because its a retirement forum. It attracts retired and people wanting to ask question about retirement.
Your probably right texdav, and the numbers are skewed here. I just can't help thinking about all the articles talking about all the people approaching retirement age with less than $200,000 (mean $165,700 now) with a modest social security check waiting for them. I know they think about retirement and worry about retirement, so wouldn't you think they might want to come on here and see what everyone on here is doing? I just wonder if they feel intimidated. Americans Are Not Remotely Financially Ready For Retirement

NoMoreSnowForMe. What a lovely post. I am happy that you have still been able to find happiness. Your location sounds so nice, and the best part I think is your ability to make new friends. That goes a long way in the happiness column.

Escort Rider. Yes, I have read some of those posts you mention. Just don't seem to be that many. I really got a kick out of the handle "burger flipper". Someone has a good sense of humor.
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Old 03-01-2015, 10:28 PM
 
2,292 posts, read 1,558,471 times
Reputation: 2737
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
You must just be missing them. I've posted that I'm on SSI and retired on a very limited income. I am in a subsidized senior apartment that is a very tiny studio. I have Medi-Cal, and have a great dog, and moved to the northern-most town on the coast of CA, where it is very affordable, and I can now walk to the ocean, and drive to the redwood forest just 7 miles away.

I can't afford to go out to eat, or travel. But, I don't need to. The trick is to get over not being able to have the retirement of your dreams. Once I accepted the limits of my budget, I'm actually quite happy with what I have. And I think it's important for seniors to know that there is a lot of subsidized senior housing out there, and my experience so far in two senior subsidized apartment buildings in two different lower COL towns in CA, is that they are very well-maintained and safe. They are inspected by the government agencies that fund them, and they make sure we're in a safe and well-maintained place.

If you get on the waiting lists, eventually you will get called. You might not be able to live in the city of your dreams, because of the COL or length of the waiting lists. But, if you can get over that, too (I originally hoped to live in the SF Bay Area, but couldn't make that work), and you're flexible, you can find somewhere nice. It turns out I love it here, where I finally ended up. And I'm already making friends.

I became disabled, so retired early. But, if people want to retire early, and they can change their idea of how much is enough, they can do it. It's hard to let go of a vision of retirement you've had for many years.

At any rate, poor retirees can be happy, too. You just need to accept what you can't change and change the things you can, and once you get the best situation you can, be happy with what you've got.

You see, I'm pretty broke, but I can choose every day whether to walk my dog by the ocean or in the redwood forest. Today we walked by the ocean. I also took some stuff to sell at the flea market and chatted with interesting people all day, and sold home-made muffins and some other junk I had. Came home and took the dog for a walk by the ocean and chatted with some cute kids who were collecting shells.

I consider myself to be lucky, now. But, I had to let go of being able to live near my daughter in the SF Bay Area. You don't get to have everything you want, but you can still have it pretty good.
You have a great attitude and I applaud you for it. Happiness can be derived from many things besides money. I would imagine many who have money are jealous of you!!
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Old 03-01-2015, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,723,738 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by modhatter View Post

Escort Rider. Yes, I have read some of those posts you mention. Just don't seem to be that many. I really got a kick out of the handle "burger flipper". Someone has a good sense of humor.
Sorry for my lack of clarity. His user name is not "burger flipper", but that is his job and is the way he often refers to himself in his posts. I didn't cite the user name on purpose, but I have no doubt he will be along shortly.
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Old 03-01-2015, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,081 posts, read 22,914,959 times
Reputation: 35192
I think the articles that say people have to have a certain amount of money are just silly. Many people will never be able to save that much money. At some point, they need to just figure out how to live with what they have.

So, maybe that's why you don't read their stories here. There are plenty posters on CD who will lambast someone who admits getting any kind of government subsidy. I get a lot of "you're welcome" responses, as if someone here is personally paying my rent.

If you look at how many times posts are read here on CD, there are a lot of lurkers. The ones who need some type of subsidy or know they will need it in the future, probably just don't want to get beaten up verbally here.

But, the reality is that most everyone will need some type of government help, even if they saved a lot of money. My mother, for instance, is in assisted living now. Her home is paid off and probably worth $700,000 or maybe even more. She had $9,000 in checking, and $400,000 in investments. This money might last 15 years. She's in a nice place she likes, and she's saved a million dollars. But, even she might outlive her investments.

Now, someone who saved $200,000? How long would that last? Most of us will end up on the dole. But, people don't want to admit it. Especially on an internet forum where they will get beaten up for it.

But, hey, I'm a rebel. I admit it. I'm on the dole, and doing fine.
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Old 03-01-2015, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,431 posts, read 2,756,099 times
Reputation: 16308
What I have saved for retirement? Zero. No matter how much I saved while I was working, something always seemed to happen to wipe out that savings, either a move, a job loss, or both. I'll be living solely on Social Security and it's not going to be that much. What I have learned though, is how little I need to live. I've been working since I was 17 and although I was doing great when I was younger, the economy and rent increases just went soaring past any wage increases I ever got. What will happen in the future, I don't know. But I guess I'll find out.
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Old 03-01-2015, 11:58 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,821 posts, read 18,826,487 times
Reputation: 33709
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
You must just be missing them. I've posted that I'm on SSI and retired on a very limited income. I am in a subsidized senior apartment that is a very tiny studio. I have Medi-Cal, and have a great dog, and moved to the northern-most town on the coast of CA, where it is very affordable, and I can now walk to the ocean, and drive to the redwood forest just 7 miles away.

I can't afford to go out to eat, or travel. But, I don't need to. The trick is to get over not being able to have the retirement of your dreams. Once I accepted the limits of my budget, I'm actually quite happy with what I have. And I think it's important for seniors to know that there is a lot of subsidized senior housing out there, and my experience so far in two senior subsidized apartment buildings in two different lower COL towns in CA, is that they are very well-maintained and safe. They are inspected by the government agencies that fund them, and they make sure we're in a safe and well-maintained place.

If you get on the waiting lists, eventually you will get called. You might not be able to live in the city of your dreams, because of the COL or length of the waiting lists. But, if you can get over that, too (I originally hoped to live in the SF Bay Area, but couldn't make that work), and you're flexible, you can find somewhere nice. It turns out I love it here, where I finally ended up. And I'm already making friends.

I became disabled, so retired early. But, if people want to retire early, and they can change their idea of how much is enough, they can do it. It's hard to let go of a vision of retirement you've had for many years.

At any rate, poor retirees can be happy, too. You just need to accept what you can't change and change the things you can, and once you get the best situation you can, be happy with what you've got.

You see, I'm pretty broke, but I can choose every day whether to walk my dog by the ocean or in the redwood forest. Today we walked by the ocean. I also took some stuff to sell at the flea market and chatted with interesting people all day, and sold home-made muffins and some other junk I had. Came home and took the dog for a walk by the ocean and chatted with some cute kids who were collecting shells.

I consider myself to be lucky, now. But, I had to let go of being able to live near my daughter in the SF Bay Area. You don't get to have everything you want, but you can still have it pretty good.
I love your post. My theory is, as you suggested, that most people who are not rich are afraid to admit it because they don't want to be bashed. I've seen it happen too many times. Someone will come on and ask for help with subsidized housing or how to get Medicaid and people attack them instead of helping them. Some people just never learned good manners, it seems.

Then there are the people who come here merely to brag--about their homes (that are usually too huge for them and they will probably live to regret), or all their expensive cars or luxurious vacations or expensive possessions. It's one thing to mention it in passing as a necessary part of the conversation but to make it center stage can be hurtful to those who do not have as much and can make it daunting for the less fortunate to post about their own lives.

Back when I worked in a public library there was a book called, "When Bad Things Happen to Good People." I never read it but this topic made me think of it. Most of the time when someone retires and is not wealthy, it is due to illness, divorce, job loss, or other instances beyond their control. Leave it to the bullies to beat them when they are down. Thanks for your honesty, NoMoreSnowForMe.
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