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Old 03-10-2015, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,763,041 times
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I ended a 34-year career as a high school teacher in a public school district with over a year and a half's worth of sick days accumulated - don't remember the number but it was over 200, and our work year was something like 185 days. We got ten days a year sick leave and could accumulate them indefinitely, although I believe that has been changed now. What I got in return was credit for extra time served in the retirement calculation formula. In other words I'd have to live a long time to really make out well on the deal, but hey, I'm not complaining. Towards the end, I had the knowledge that I had a real insurance policy in case I had a serious illness or injury.

I was one of those ultra-conscientious people; one time I went five years without taking a single sick day.
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Old 03-11-2015, 04:32 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
664 posts, read 641,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I was one of those ultra-conscientious people; one time I went five years without taking a single sick day.
You can afford to be ultra-conscientious when you know you can "bank" your sick days indefinitely.

For the vast majority of workers, however, it's use 'em or lose 'em.

Even worse are the dreaded "PDAs" (Paid Days Off), that have unified vacation and sick days together. Now when you get sick, you end up blowing vacation days for it.
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Old 03-11-2015, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,235 posts, read 54,695,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
I think that the media assumes that most Americans have upper middle class lifestyles and live in high COL areas like the East and West Coasts. Consequently, they figure that that most Americans will need retirement nest eggs big enough to support those assumptions. You see this mindset in just about every single commercial for retirement planning and hear it from all the retirement "gurus" all the time.

With the median US household income between $50 and $55k, most Americans are barely living middle class lifestyles, and most people do not live in the pricey coastal metros, either. Never having had two new cars at the same time or a brand new 3000 square foot house or a vacation home in the mountains or at the shore, most Americans are not going to miss those things when they retire, and so they don't need the very large retirement nest eggs the media thinks they need.
Haha so true. I've never had a new car and I've got a 942 s.f. condo. I do sorta have vacations at the shore, because the beach is only 15 minutes away, so in summer I take a week's vacation and drive to the beach each day!
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Old 03-11-2015, 07:03 AM
 
29,816 posts, read 34,907,142 times
Reputation: 11735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I ended a 34-year career as a high school teacher in a public school district with over a year and a half's worth of sick days accumulated - don't remember the number but it was over 200, and our work year was something like 185 days. We got ten days a year sick leave and could accumulate them indefinitely, although I believe that has been changed now. What I got in return was credit for extra time served in the retirement calculation formula. In other words I'd have to live a long time to really make out well on the deal, but hey, I'm not complaining. Towards the end, I had the knowledge that I had a real insurance policy in case I had a serious illness or injury.

I was one of those ultra-conscientious people; one time I went five years without taking a single sick day.
Awesome Escort, Glad you were ultra-responsible in using your sick days knowing that if you were out a substitute would be needed and both of you would be paid. I am sure the tax payers appreciated your ultra responsibility to their tax dollars. I am sure your parents and students appreciated your ultra responsibility in wanting to be there and provide them quality direct instruction instead of indirect instruction by a substitute implementing the lesson plan you prepared. I am sure your administrators appreciated your ultra professionalism in helping them to keep school operations working efficiently on a day to day basis. Your ultra-professionalism I am sure was appreciated by all who had a stake in your job performance.
Kudo's
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Old 03-11-2015, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,485 posts, read 5,947,197 times
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Studies have shown that people who have more birthdays live the longest. Keep this in mind as you make your plans.
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Old 03-11-2015, 11:10 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,772 posts, read 7,057,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCTelevisionWriter View Post
You can afford to be ultra-conscientious when you know you can "bank" your sick days indefinitely.

For the vast majority of workers, however, it's use 'em or lose 'em.

Even worse are the dreaded "PDAs" (Paid Days Off), that have unified vacation and sick days together. Now when you get sick, you end up blowing vacation days for it.

Or if you don't use them as sick days, you can use them as vacation days. That generally gives you more vacation days than you would have accrued, which can be advantageous if you aren't inclined to use your sick days for things other than being sick. And you'll be paid for unused "PDA" ( or PTO, Paid Time Off, as they called it in the jobs I had that used it) when you retire or quit that job. Unlike designated sick days for many employers.
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Old 03-11-2015, 11:13 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,772 posts, read 7,057,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
Studies have shown that people who have more birthdays live the longest. Keep this in mind as you make your plans.
But..but what happens when you decide you're not going to acknowledge any more birthdays, because, well, they just make you older?
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Old 03-11-2015, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,485 posts, read 5,947,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
But..but what happens when you decide you're not going to acknowledge any more birthdays, because, well, they just make you older?
Then you have entered my world. That age between loving to tell people how old you are (when you are 14 and no longer a child, in your eyes anyway) and the age when you love to tell people how old you are (when you are 80 and you love to tell people as it is a badge of honor). All ages in between iis when you would rather not have birthdays.
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Old 03-11-2015, 04:58 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,772 posts, read 7,057,711 times
Reputation: 14315
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
Then you have entered my world. That age between loving to tell people how old you are (when you are 14 and no longer a child, in your eyes anyway) and the age when you love to tell people how old you are (when you are 80 and you love to tell people as it is a badge of honor). All ages in between iis when you would rather not have birthdays.
LOL, I guess I'm still there! Thing is, though, I don't mind telling people how old I am, in the event they ask. I figured out a long time ago that no one else really cares how old you are. They only care how old they are.
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Old 03-12-2015, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,235 posts, read 54,695,623 times
Reputation: 66723
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
Studies have shown that people who have more birthdays live the longest. Keep this in mind as you make your plans.
I try to do that. Why, I just celebrated being 56 and a half last month!
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