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Old 03-14-2015, 12:11 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
7,629 posts, read 14,391,397 times
Reputation: 18712

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[quote=ByebyeWisconsin;38813982]
Makes me laugh a bit when I see something that says 'affordable' and homes begin in low $400'. Yes, I know that to many that is affordable, but it's above our budget. This may well be just the ones that my search engine is discovering. Perhaps if I clear the cache I'll expand the results.

So true!!! Depending on where you are "coming from" that might be twice as expensive as you have ever owned a house. That is why I said some of our neighbors coming from CA pay cash for their homes and have LOTS left over from the sale of their home in CA!

Our little slice of paradise (here in Texas) is about 1/2 that (on average here), but you can certainly spend that and more with add-on's.

Check out the size of some of those homes...ours here averages just under 2000 sq ft.
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Old 03-14-2015, 12:59 PM
 
36 posts, read 45,307 times
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Around 1800 - 2000 sq ft is very comfortable for us. We do like to spread out, but keep it reasonable to clean as well. Funny, because we raised 3 boys in a home 1900 sq ft and that never felt too small. Shouldn't it feel too big now? All a matter of perspective. When I think of the small ranch style house my parents raised me and my 3 siblings in, less than 1200 sq ft. We didn't know it was smallish as everyone in our neighborhood had similar experiences.

So many places I could probably find the perfect home, if I could only arrange for those grandkidlets to be closer...

All of that being said, I thoroughly enjoy the search. In the meantime, I'm also enjoying where we currently live. It's almost an acre, on a small lake. Today the temps are in high 50's. So after some yard work we had a fire in the fireplace, brought out the lawn chairs and just sat for a couple of hours. Paradise? It's different for all of us, isn't it? And that's what makes this such an interesting journey.
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Old 03-14-2015, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,696,516 times
Reputation: 35450
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
You know I have had neighbors like this and not even lived in a 55+ community there are those kinds of neighbors everywhere not just in 55 + communitys .
I agree with this. I have lived in apartment buildings all my life and I have had this happen to me and it hasn't been old folks who have pounced on me. I don't drive so it hasn't been a case of someone trying to get me to chauffeur them around but there have been neighbors who have tried to latch on to the point where they became pests because they were lonely or needy or just plain nosy.

Whenever you live in close proximity to others, this is bound to happen. I think when people who have lived in homes all their lives encounter community living they don't quite know how to deal with it. I do think though, that chances are as some people get older they will become more needy and lonely and so this type of thing may happen more in a senior community than in a typical apartment dwelling situation.

Now having said all that, I am contemplating my next move to an over 55 community. I think I can deal with the needy ones because I have done it before. I am someone who, when I am behind my closed door alone, I want to stay that way. Call first if you want to come by and I will tell you whether or not it's okay. I value my alone time.

I do like the idea of an over 55 community though because of the amenities and the fact that I have my eye on a nice income subsidized one for which my income qualifies. I like the idea of having company (when I want it) nearby and activities (when I want them) close as well. This is a very active community with lots going on. Although I don't mind taking the bus to a couple of activities now, it has become more difficult as time goes by and having things to do on the premises would be really nice.

Since there are people who are charge of the facility who are there every day, if I passed out and fell down in my apartment I wouldn't have to worry I wouldn't be found until I was rotting away with the cat having eaten my face.

This is a real lifestyle change. It isn't for everyone and I sometimes wonder if it would be right for me but I just turned 69, I moved to a new city last June and no longer have the support system I had in the previous city. So for me, it's probably the right decision. Everyone has to weigh the pros and cons and decide what they think will work for them.
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Old 03-14-2015, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,763,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ByebyeWisconsin View Post
Around 1800 - 2000 sq ft is very comfortable for us. We do like to spread out, but keep it reasonable to clean as well. Funny, because we raised 3 boys in a home 1900 sq ft and that never felt too small. Shouldn't it feel too big now? All a matter of perspective. When I think of the small ranch style house my parents raised me and my 3 siblings in, less than 1200 sq ft. We didn't know it was smallish as everyone in our neighborhood had similar experiences. ...........
So true about home size being relative to what one is used to, and as a nation our perspective on that issue has changed. Until I was 14 (in 1958) our family (mother, father, and two kids) lived in a two-bedroom, one bath (no half-bath either) house. We didn't know it was so terrible to have to wait to use the bathroom because that's all we knew - and it was very common at the time.
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Old 03-14-2015, 01:37 PM
 
28,285 posts, read 39,947,386 times
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True. It's what you know so it's "normal". Our "bathroom" was about 100 feet behind the house, and was a two-holer until I was in fifth grade.
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Old 03-15-2015, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,217 posts, read 54,695,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
So true about home size being relative to what one is used to, and as a nation our perspective on that issue has changed. Until I was 14 (in 1958) our family (mother, father, and two kids) lived in a two-bedroom, one bath (no half-bath either) house. We didn't know it was so terrible to have to wait to use the bathroom because that's all we knew - and it was very common at the time.
My friend bought a small brick house in Arlington, VA, that was probably built in the late 40s, early 50s. Three small bedrooms, one bath, a small living room, dining area and kitchen. The basement was remodeled and has another bedroom and bathroom, but that came later.

She lives alone with her pets but those bedrooms are packed with all the crap she buys from QVC. I told her "you know a family of six probably lived here in the 1950s, right?"
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Old 03-15-2015, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,696,516 times
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I am looking for a HUD subsidized retirement community due to my limited income. I am finding a heck of a lot of rules and regulations go with these places because they are government run places. I met a nice woman who lives in one of the buildings I had my eye on who showed me around her building. Her place was the usual tiny apartment but very nice in the way of really up to date appliances and plumbing fixtures and the like. But some of the rules were crazy like not being allowed to put a small decoration in a little alcove that is outside everyone's door because they are meant for messages from the management. And which times the tenants were allowed to use which entrances. Things like that.

Those kinds of rules can vary. I know that regular retirement communities have rules too. So I would think that before anyone buys into or signs a rental lease the thing to do would be to read the rules very carefully beforehand so you won't be sorry later. I see too many people complaining about all the restrictions they discover after they make the move and it makes me wonder as to whether or not they checked into the criteria required to live in their communities before they moved in.

I have learned to be really careful about that.
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Old 03-15-2015, 10:10 PM
 
14,267 posts, read 24,025,211 times
Reputation: 20101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
I am looking for a HUD subsidized retirement community due to my limited income. I am finding a heck of a lot of rules and regulations go with these places because they are government run places. I met a nice woman who lives in one of the buildings I had my eye on who showed me around her building. Her place was the usual tiny apartment but very nice in the way of really up to date appliances and plumbing fixtures and the like. But some of the rules were crazy like not being allowed to put a small decoration in a little alcove that is outside everyone's door because they are meant for messages from the management. And which times the tenants were allowed to use which entrances. Things like that.

I have not lived in Lakewood since 2000 although I came close to buying (back) a property in 2008.

There are several rent subsidized senior complexes on Detroit Ave. near the center of Lakewood. You might call Lakewood City Hall. The employees there are extremely helpful in helping seniors.
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Old 03-18-2015, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,696,516 times
Reputation: 35450
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I have not lived in Lakewood since 2000 although I came close to buying (back) a property in 2008.

There are several rent subsidized senior complexes on Detroit Ave. near the center of Lakewood. You might call Lakewood City Hall. The employees there are extremely helpful in helping seniors.
I am at the opposite end in Cleveland Heights but I have been to Lakewood and really like it. I'll check it out. Thanks.
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