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Old 03-08-2015, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,100 posts, read 22,968,690 times
Reputation: 35282

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rothbear View Post
Yep, that is what you think it is. 1952 Seeburg. DH used to refurb them and resell.
What fun! Do you make your friends put quarters in ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by volosong View Post
Somewhat off-topic, but computer technology related.

I quit windows about five years ago. There is nothing wrong with XP and nothing wrong with Windows 7. I switched to Linux, because on my home computer, Linux did everything that I wanted to do. About a year ago, I got a Mac laptop, and shortly thereafter, a Mac mini. The transition from Windows to Linux was almost seamless, and Linux if free! Free is good.

The transition from Windows/Linux to Mac OS is a little more difficult. It's taken some time, but the OS sure is a whole lot more stable, and pretty much virus free. As we all know, Macs cost more. After using them for a year or so, I now understand that 'you get what you pay for'. They really are worth the extra cost.
Ugh, it's the transition I am not looking forward to. But, if they are worth the money, I'd rather upgrade to something decent. I can't believe what garbage new $800 Windows laptops are! Even rothbear above said she bought a brand new Lenovo and had to put in a new Wi-fi card. Just junk!

I spend a pretty penny on this old Compaq and it's been true blue. No problems ever since around 2007, I think is when I bought it. That's what I want again in my next computer. I want one that will last, with an OS that will not have to be updated until the computer dies. That's looking like a Mac. I think I'm going to have to bite the bullet.
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Old 03-08-2015, 09:26 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,841 posts, read 18,861,423 times
Reputation: 33748
I was originally a techno-phobe. That was back when you had to use DOS commands and I totally refused to learn. I'll admit that one good thing my ex did was to buy a computer back around 1996/7. I learned fast but only because I got interested in genealogy and I thought maybe I could do it on a computer. (Understatement of the century--I connected with distant relatives in the UK and the rest is history.) I used to say that everything I knew about computers, I learned in that great UK genealogy group.

I'm still not very techie and never will be, although I depend upon the internet for all sorts of research and for things as simple as looking up a recipe or the phone number of the hairdresser. I sell on ebay, I research genealogy, I connect on facebook, and I pay most of the bills online.

I couldn't get along without a computer. It makes things so much easier. For example, when you want to plan a trip you can research places to stay, things to see, best prices, and so on.

I have an ancient flip cell phone but I don't even use it very much. A smart phone would be nice but I wouldn't know what to get, probably can't afford one, and probably can't afford the monthly fees.

I have a kindle which I rarely use because I just haven't been reading lately. I prefer a real book but for travel the kindle is fine. If the book is really, really good I don't care what it's on.

I have a Roku for tv but we aren't tv watchers unless there's something really good on (and there usually isn't.) We watch movies using the Roku occasionally.

I guess the next thing would be a smart phone if I could afford one. It would help with ebay and if I get into selling on Amazon. As with the computer originally, I have to have a good reason or else I won't do it.
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Old 03-08-2015, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Idaho
4,627 posts, read 4,468,721 times
Reputation: 9050
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
... That's what I want again in my next computer. I want one that will last, with an OS that will not have to be updated until the computer dies. That's looking like a Mac. I think I'm going to have to bite the bullet.
Apple does update their OS periodically. It is a no-cost download, (unlike their major competitor in the OS business). Changes are relatively minor, but the last one changed the 'look and feel' more than usual. They went to 'flat' icons and introduced a now well-known bug that disables the mouse upon waking from sleep. That one is driving me batty. Wish I stayed with the older version.
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Old 03-08-2015, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
4,000 posts, read 3,258,179 times
Reputation: 7114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lastfire View Post
I believe you can be both the person who uses stamps/mail and also use the computer. Why not? Some bills I pay via computer but some agencies have sorry billing systems (which I don't trust). I use the stamp and envelope for those. I order items using Prime/Amazon but I still love to "hold a real book." Even if he does everything the old-fashioned way, I think that is okay. He is happy...let him be.
Kind of how my old man saw it, too, as an octogenarian before his time came. Books were free to give, and take, at City Hall back where he lived and that kept him fed with interesting materials.

I got him going in 2001 on a desktop computer with Windows XP and dial-up access, all free to him. Worked OK, over the ensuing years. He was happy enough paying some things online, the rest by mail. I audited his well-kept books, later on, and turns out he did fine with ledger paper and checks for roughly half his business. The important stuff, portfolio management, he left to a smart Wharton MBA. Most of the conversations were by phone, the statements by mail.

The billing systems, so to speak, are better these days that just a few years ago. I give them my credit card info, and I'm shielded from loss, so I really don't care if they're breached. It's happened a few times, I've never lost a nickel and build up significant travel miles on the Visa card in the process. For 90% of the purchases I make, every single day. Inching towards 99% and zero-cash, though that's still a couple years away.

I think my dad would have liked Amazon Prime, too, though I'm reminded he and I often spent a lazy Saturday shopping the Sears tool section when I was a kid, too c. four decades ago now. He'd rummage the bargain bin and find cool stuff, sometimes. Ah well: now I "rummage" Amazon deals. Ain't the same, though.
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Old 03-08-2015, 11:06 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,943,432 times
Reputation: 18050
Quote:
Originally Posted by rothbear View Post
I had to laugh when reading this. DH and I are almost opposite ends of the spectrum. I do everything online, have a smartphone where I text, play games, and do things online. I keep my GPS updated and try to learn new things as they come out. I'm not the most tech savvy person in the world but I at least try to keep up with what will help me in my daily life. I just bought myself a new Lenovo computer that had problems, so I just finished putting in a new WiFi card. Once I get it up an running I will wipe this one and set it back up for DH to use. I do all the financial stuff online...I just finished our taxes this afternoon....and only write checks when I absolutely have to.

Now DH, on the other hand, thinks that phones still should have cords! He has a flip phone from work and refuses to upgrade even though his bosses have been bugging him. Instead of messaging he calls or tells them to call. Now he does use a computer for work and some personal things including email, but he often tells me to look up something or order something, etc.

And vinyl???? Not only do we have tons of albums, but probably close to 1000 45s. Why you ask? Here is a picture of our sunroom telling you why. Yep, that is what you think it is. 1952 Seeburg. DH used to refurb them and resell.
I can relate to the phone. I have a cell since they first came out with bag phones. then the smaller. I use to often not take calls and only used it when I wanted to make a call. I have never text and I still use a land line at home to use for general business; never give out my cell but to friends and family. I really rarely make a call on it even. I just use it for semi-emergencies; I'll call them. We have three desktops ;two such as this one for pleasure and then one not connected for personal business. Have a laptop we just do not use with smart phones really.
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Old 03-09-2015, 12:58 AM
 
Location: Bay Area, California
118 posts, read 128,028 times
Reputation: 619
Since I live one mile from Apple world headquarters, I, of course use Apple products. I shudder to think what would happen to me here if I didn't.

I consider myself a "techno-idiot" and proud of it. That said, the Mac products are so very easy to use. A year or two ago, I bought the Apple "one-to-one." It cost $99. for a whole year and you can go every day if you want! You make an appointment and go to the Apple store & sit with a trainer who very patiently shows you how to use your laptop, iPad, iPhone, iPod and all of them together. They have showed me how to do "power-point" presentations, record a CD and mix it, and so many things I never dreamed of. It is very enjoyable to learn and has impressed my kids... (not easy to do)

Apple products are virtually virus-free so they last a long time. My last laptop was 8 year of daily use & my iPhone 5 years.
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Old 03-09-2015, 04:14 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
664 posts, read 640,407 times
Reputation: 514
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Recently, I have mentioned the new person in my life, SO's cousin. He relocated from NYC to Vegas. He is seriously, with just a few exceptions, a throwback to the 1980's. He is in his 60's but to me he seems 'older' than my mom was in her mid 80's.
I wonder how I'D compare to your mother. I'm in my 40s and in many cases a throwback to the '70s.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
He does use a cellphone.
Thank goodness for him, right? So do I. An iPhone. With quite a few apps, too!

Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
He still buys stamps, checks, and mails his bills.
So do I.

Here's a little inside info: a friend of mine who works in counter-terrorism with the FBI refuses to let anyone in his family do ANY financial transactions online. Why? Because he knows just how unsecure the Internet really is, despite all these assurances from reputable companies about "encryption". The American public has been hoodwinked by trading privacy and security in exchange for a little bit of convenience. One day it'll bite us all in the a$$.

In addition to the security aspect, I find the action of sitting down each month and writing out checks to be quite a therapeutic method of self-discipline. You gain a greater appreciation for (and greater monitoring of) the outflow from your checking accounts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
He loves the library. And he goes there in person to check out books. And carries them home on the bus. I showed him how I do it. I virtually go to the library and download what I want to read. Sometimes I read a book on the computer, and sometimes I will put the book on my Android or Nook so it's portable.
Moderator cut: personal - off topic Here's what YOU are missing when you "virtually" go to the library: Exercise. Fresh air. Interacting with people. Maybe running into an old friend, or making a new one. Finding a $20 bill on the sidewalk. Comforting a lost child. And once you get to the library, exposure to books and publications you can get only by walking past them, glancing over them, and perusing them in person; none of this would happen using a search engine.

Here's what HE is NOT missing by reading books and not staring at an illuminated screen: eye strain and potential gradual retinal damage, as well as a higher retention rate of what he's reading (as evidenced by a growing body of research).

FYI, books are just as "portable" as your Android or Nook.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
He loves music. He has an extensive collection...wait for it....on vinyl. He has never owned a CD. He actually has a turntable and plays records. So I showed him my ipod. SO introduced him to his collection of CD's and the wonder of Bose speakers. And burned him a CD.
I also have an extensive collection ... wait for it ... ON VINYL TOO!!

Yes, I also have an extensive CD collection. But over the years I've discovered that vinyl gives you a superior sound to compressed digital files. This is why the best DJs in Manhattan and LA clubs never stopped using vinyl. And why it's making such a huge comeback.

Oh yes, I also have Bose speakers. The legendary model 901 from 1969 that can STILL handle an unlimited amount of power and leave whatever little plastic models you're undoubtedly plugging into your electronic device in the dust.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Maybe the most confusing part of this is that he is our contemporary and it's like talking to your grandparents. I have no idea if he can be dragged into this millennium but I'm going to try. I built him a laptop out of spare parts I had lying around. I guess a new challenge for me will be trying to teach him how to use it.
Wow. Have you never watched Oprah? One of her cardinal rules: Don't try to change a man. Not only will he not change, he will resent you for trying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
How can anyone reach 60+ in this day and age NOT be computer savvy? He has never bought anything online either.
Horrors!!

As if buying stuff online makes one somehow superior.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Take a minute to think about what technology does for us every day and be thankful we aren't like this guy!
Indeed! Let's take a minute to think about that.

Greatly diminished financial privacy.
Greatly diminished personal privacy.
Cyberterrorism.
Cyberbullying.
Erosion of a sense of community.
An entire younger generation that lacks basic interpersonal communication skills.
A near-100% surveillance state.
A dangerous reliance on an increasingly fragile power grid for nearly every aspect of our lives, from food production and distribution to records of ownership -- no longer in solid form, but existing only as digits in "cyberspace".

Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Just being able to access and use things online, like this forum, from our armchairs, is a great gift. Till I met this guy I took most of it for granted. I think I will start paying more attention!
To be sure, the Internet has revolutionized life and the dissemination of information in profoundly positive ways (third-world regimes, for instance, no longer being able to keep entire nations in ignorance).

But I think you'd do well to learn how to appreciate the "old" ways of doing things that are responsible, after all, for bringing about this Brave New World of ours.

Just a little piece of advice from a young whipper snapper.

Last edited by Marka; 03-11-2015 at 11:52 PM..
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Old 03-09-2015, 05:03 AM
 
140 posts, read 213,972 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
This should be a feel good thread for all of us! 'We', collectively speaking, are pretty much cutting edge compared to lots of folks out there. We are lucky. Technology helps us every day. For the most part, we are still learning and growing.

I wonder if there will come a day when I suddenly become too old to be interested or change/adapt to what's new out there? I hope not and I am planning on fighting it! Still learning my new Android so I can't go over the hill yet! And I just finished extending my wired and wireless network. Works much better now!

Recently, I have mentioned the new person in my life, SO's cousin. He relocated from NYC to Vegas. He is seriously, with just a few exceptions, a throwback to the 1980's. He is in his 60's but to me he seems 'older' than my mom was in her mid 80's.

He does use a cellphone. But when it comes to paying the bill, he will travel by bus to the store and pay an extra dollar to pay it in person and get a receipt. He is disabled and walks with a cane so this trip will take him at least a couple hours. And it will be painful too. Plus the bus costs money. So I showed him it takes less than 10 seconds to pay a cell bill online and you get a confirming text and an email receipt within seconds. Will he do it? I think not.

He still buys stamps, checks, and mails his bills. Then he checks with each company every month to make sure they received his payment. Really? I don't think I have done these things for decades. Everything is online.

He loves the library. And he goes there in person to check out books. And carries them home on the bus. I showed him how I do it. I virtually go to the library and download what I want to read. Sometimes I read a book on the computer, and sometimes I will put the book on my Android or Nook so it's portable. The look on his face was pure deer in headlights. Just the idea totally befuddled him.

He loves music. Growing up in NYC and living there all these years gave him the opportunity to actually see almost all his favorite artists. He has an extensive collection...wait for it....on vinyl. He has never owned a CD. He actually has a turntable and plays records. So I showed him my ipod. SO introduced him to his collection of CD's and the wonder of Bose speakers. And burned him a CD.

Maybe the most confusing part of this is that he is our contemporary and it's like talking to your grandparents. I have no idea if he can be dragged into this millennium but I'm going to try. I built him a laptop out of spare parts I had lying around. I guess a new challenge for me will be trying to teach him how to use it.

How can anyone reach 60+ in this day and age NOT be computer savvy? He has never bought anything online either.

Take a minute to think about what technology does for us every day and be thankful we aren't like this guy! Just being able to access and use things online, like this forum, from our armchairs, is a great gift. Till I met this guy I took most of it for granted. I think I will start paying more attention!
This popped up on my sidebar. I'm 22 years old. I have a cell (not a smartphone) and I pay my bill in person, I mail my bills and I don't shop on line. My credit card info got stolen once so I stopped. Sometimes old school is better! Vinyl sounds better than CD and I have kept and grown my moms collection (my music taste doesn't really include anything post-90 anyways):

Why is newer always better? Sometimes things don't need to constantly change!!

Oh, and i love the library. Reading on a kindle is not the same experience at all. There ain't nothing like reading an actual book.


Be grateful you grew up in an era when people still communicated, when America was a decent country with morals and values, the old way is better.
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Old 03-09-2015, 06:04 AM
 
1,706 posts, read 1,226,003 times
Reputation: 4829
Personal preference, convenience, habit, and life experience all come into play when looking at why a particular individual does or doesn't use the computer. It can be dangerous to make assumptions based on your observations alone.
I began using a computer in my late 30's as an inventory management tool, then in my scholarly work, and currently work on the computer all day.
I have an old-fashioned antique flip phone that has a pay-per-minute plan; it maybe costs me $15/month. I have never had any interest in talking on the phone for hours or in being in constant contact with anyone. A phone is a tool, nothing more, and if I could go without one I would.
I do all my banking and bill-paying on the internet because it is more convenient and saves time.
I do pay Hulu to stream to my computer because I don't have cable.
I do NOT play games, use Facebook, text, or download books. To me, more than a few minutes spent on the internet, other than to read the news, or for scholarly pursuits or research, is a waste of time. I prefer to interact in real time with real people in real life. Actual life experience trumps time spent in virtual worlds.
I also do not use a Kindle- I absolutely hate them. I like the feel of a book. I like going to the actual physical library and browsing the shelves.
I also do not have a tablet- to my taste they are redundant and a gimmick to spend money on. It might be worth it if someone only had a desktop computer, but I have a laptop.
Very early on, my first computer 1995-ish or so was a windows custom built and cost a small fortune. Never again. I love my Apple Air.
I can't imagine life without my computer, but at the same time, it is just a tool. To use or not use technology for a particular purpose is about convenience and quality of life- will a particular technology make my life easier or better? If not, I likely won't keep up with it. Your friend may feel the same way- what he does works for him. The trips to the post office and library are likely social occasions for him that help keep him connected to the world.
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Old 03-09-2015, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,699 posts, read 8,490,820 times
Reputation: 29399
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
This should be a feel good thread for all of us! 'We', collectively speaking, are pretty much cutting edge compared to lots of folks out there. We are lucky. Technology helps us every day. For the most part, we are still learning and growing.

I wonder if there will come a day when I suddenly become too old to be interested or change/adapt to what's new out there? I hope not and I am planning on fighting it! Still learning my new Android so I can't go over the hill yet! And I just finished extending my wired and wireless network. Works much better now!

Recently, I have mentioned the new person in my life, SO's cousin. He relocated from NYC to Vegas. He is seriously, with just a few exceptions, a throwback to the 1980's. He is in his 60's but to me he seems 'older' than my mom was in her mid 80's.

He does use a cellphone. But when it comes to paying the bill, he will travel by bus to the store and pay an extra dollar to pay it in person and get a receipt. He is disabled and walks with a cane so this trip will take him at least a couple hours. And it will be painful too. Plus the bus costs money. So I showed him it takes less than 10 seconds to pay a cell bill online and you get a confirming text and an email receipt within seconds. Will he do it? I think not.

He still buys stamps, checks, and mails his bills. Then he checks with each company every month to make sure they received his payment. Really? I don't think I have done these things for decades. Everything is online.

He loves the library. And he goes there in person to check out books. And carries them home on the bus. I showed him how I do it. I virtually go to the library and download what I want to read. Sometimes I read a book on the computer, and sometimes I will put the book on my Android or Nook so it's portable. The look on his face was pure deer in headlights. Just the idea totally befuddled him.

He loves music. Growing up in NYC and living there all these years gave him the opportunity to actually see almost all his favorite artists. He has an extensive collection...wait for it....on vinyl. He has never owned a CD. He actually has a turntable and plays records. So I showed him my ipod. SO introduced him to his collection of CD's and the wonder of Bose speakers. And burned him a CD.

Maybe the most confusing part of this is that he is our contemporary and it's like talking to your grandparents. I have no idea if he can be dragged into this millennium but I'm going to try. I built him a laptop out of spare parts I had lying around. I guess a new challenge for me will be trying to teach him how to use it.

How can anyone reach 60+ in this day and age NOT be computer savvy? He has never bought anything online either.

Take a minute to think about what technology does for us every day and be thankful we aren't like this guy! Just being able to access and use things online, like this forum, from our armchairs, is a great gift. Till I met this guy I took most of it for granted. I think I will start paying more attention!
This is an egocentric "You should do things the way I do them because my way is the right way" thread. Your friend is not computer savvy. So what? He does things the way he wants to do them. It's his choice. If taking the bus to pay the one bill is much more difficult or painful for him (it sounds like you don't even know that for certain), that's too bad, but that's what he prefers. However, for the majority of people who have arthritis or other difficulties with mobility, walking as much as possible is the BEST thing they can do for their muscles, bones, and joints, even if it's painful. It prevents contractures, muscle atrophy, and reduces osteoporosis. My ex MIL wouldn't bank online because she didn't trust her financial info on the internet. Even though I bank online and prefer that, I didn't hassle her about her choosing a different way. My 90 year old grandmother never owned a computer, never got online, and mailed her bills her whole life.

She did buy a cellphone, but she only used it to make phone calls, and I only encouraged her to own one because she drove out of state frequently by herself and I was concerned for her safety. There's nothing wrong with the way your SO's cousin chooses to live. And it's really none of your business either. As an aside, I think the old school way of doing things is sometimes the best way. Taking the bus to the library gives him the chance to get out of his house, visit with other people, see and feel and touch the books, be outdoors and make other stops, things that downloading an ebook doesn't. Vinyl collections are often worth thousands of dollars because most people don't keep them anymore. Did you ever consider these things? Probably not.

Last edited by Scooby Snacks; 03-09-2015 at 08:49 AM..
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