U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-09-2015, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Idaho
1,456 posts, read 1,158,299 times
Reputation: 5523

Advertisements

Sometimes you have to spend or invest some money upfront to save money in the long run so buying high quality long lasting items is a must. If you do your research, plan ahead and be patient (which retirees tend to have), you can always get the desired items at bargain prices. With some practices and google help, you can become a 'savvy' shopper. You will know what the best time of the year to buy certain items, what stores/sites to check for black friday, cyber monday, end-of-season sale, reliable refurbished, open boxed, demo items etc.

Before buying any items, I also check coupon sites to see if there is one for the store/site which I intend to shop. Here is the link to some best coupon sites

The 13 Best Coupon Sites Out There

It is also very easy to double or triple 'dips' into the saving pot. There are online sites which give you cash back for online purchases such as fatwallet or ebates. For folks who like to travel, you can add miles to your frequent flyer mileage and keep them from expiring. If I need to buy something from a local store, I usually spend few minutes online to see if I can purchase the item through an airline shopping partners site with either free in-store pickup or even with free delivery. I have an email address mainly for shopping where I get notifications of deals. Airlines usually give extra bonus 5miles or even up to 25 miles per dollar for a certain store near or during holidays.

Back to the ideas of spending some money to save money, some of my best investments are in quality appliances and cookwares. A good breadmaker pays for itself many times over in a short time and let you make healthy bread. You can make wholewheat, gluten free, add almond flour, wheat germs, oats, soy flour or whatever organic, healthy ingredients to your own bread. I used to buy wholewheat flour but had to keep it in the refrigerator. It is also difficult to find organic flour without any kind of preservative so I invested in a flour mill (Wondermill) about 7 years ago (got it at 60% by bidding on ebay late at night ;-). The mill paid for itself within few months! My latest 'investment' was in a stainless steel pressure cooker. We had one many years ago but I did not replace it after the seal wore out. With our renewed interest in making homemade soup with beans, lentils, peas and barleys (cheap source of proteins), I decided to get the pressure cooker to save time (don't have to soak the beans) and electricity (it takes 1/6th of the time to cook on the stove). I can go on and on about other stuffs such as the attached meat grinder to my Kitchen aid mixer which let us make homemade chemical free sausages but I should stop now before readers are tired of reading my post ;-)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-09-2015, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,134 posts, read 23,019,359 times
Reputation: 35368
Another thought - haircuts. You can get a good cut really cheap. I used to go to barber shops to get my hair cut. I didn't require anything fancy, and the barber shop in town (Davis, CA at the time) had a woman barber as one of the barbers. She didn't shampoo or blow dry my hair, but she'd give me a great cut.

I'm a big tipper. That's one reason I don't go out much, as I believe if the service is good, a big tip is in order, so I budget accordingly. You can get a great cut for $10, and then be able to tip the stylist/barber $10 and they will always be happy to see you walk in the door.

And I used to color my hair myself. I let it go gray now, but you can save a bundle by coloring your hair yourself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2015, 08:57 PM
 
6,307 posts, read 4,755,565 times
Reputation: 12919
Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
........
Retired folks certainly have more time than when they were working to spend on finding ways to save money. .........
I have been busy since I retired. There are way more things that I am trying to do and want to do than I have time or energy to accomplish. Trying to find ways to save money is not one of my interests or hobbies. I do force myself to occasionally pay attention to my retirement funds. Spending a bit of time trying to invest wisely can make substantial returns instead of the few dollars I would save with the same amount of effort.

I am sure there are some retired people who sit around the house with little to do. I am not one of them nor do I know any.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2015, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,134 posts, read 23,019,359 times
Reputation: 35368
Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
Sometimes you have to spend or invest some money upfront to save money in the long run so buying high quality long lasting items is a must. If you do your research, plan ahead and be patient (which retirees tend to have), you can always get the desired items at bargain prices. With some practices and google help, you can become a 'savvy' shopper. You will know what the best time of the year to buy certain items, what stores/sites to check for black friday, cyber monday, end-of-season sale, reliable refurbished, open boxed, demo items etc.

Before buying any items, I also check coupon sites to see if there is one for the store/site which I intend to shop. Here is the link to some best coupon sites

The 13 Best Coupon Sites Out There

It is also very easy to double or triple 'dips' into the saving pot. There are online sites which give you cash back for online purchases such as fatwallet or ebates. For folks who like to travel, you can add miles to your frequent flyer mileage and keep them from expiring. If I need to buy something from a local store, I usually spend few minutes online to see if I can purchase the item through an airline shopping partners site with either free in-store pickup or even with free delivery. I have an email address mainly for shopping where I get notifications of deals. Airlines usually give extra bonus 5miles or even up to 25 miles per dollar for a certain store near or during holidays.

Back to the ideas of spending some money to save money, some of my best investments are in quality appliances and cookwares. A good breadmaker pays for itself many times over in a short time and let you make healthy bread. You can make wholewheat, gluten free, add almond flour, wheat germs, oats, soy flour or whatever organic, healthy ingredients to your own bread. I used to buy wholewheat flour but had to keep it in the refrigerator. It is also difficult to find organic flour without any kind of preservative so I invested in a flour mill (Wondermill) about 7 years ago (got it at 60% by bidding on ebay late at night ;-). The mill paid for itself within few months! My latest 'investment' was in a stainless steel pressure cooker. We had one many years ago but I did not replace it after the seal wore out. With our renewed interest in making homemade soup with beans, lentils, peas and barleys (cheap source of proteins), I decided to get the pressure cooker to save time (don't have to soak the beans) and electricity (it takes 1/6th of the time to cook on the stove). I can go on and on about other stuffs such as the attached meat grinder to my Kitchen aid mixer which let us make homemade chemical free sausages but I should stop now before readers are tired of reading my post ;-)
Speaking for myself, I'm not tired of reading your post at all! Great tips! It never occurred to me it would be worth the money to buy a mill, etc. I also didn't know about the airline click through partners. I knew about fatwallet, and I also do swagbucks. But, the more info the better. Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2015, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,134 posts, read 23,019,359 times
Reputation: 35368
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I have been busy since I retired. There are way more things that I am trying to do and want to do than I have time or energy to accomplish. Trying to find ways to save money is not one of my interests or hobbies. I do force myself to occasionally pay attention to my retirement funds. Spending a bit of time trying to invest wisely can make substantial returns instead of the few dollars I would save with the same amount of effort.

I am sure there are some retired people who sit around the house with little to do. I am not one of them nor do I know any.
Well, so your focus is on making more money you can spend, rather than spending less so your dollars go farther. Nothing wrong with that. Same end, different means.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2015, 09:07 PM
 
11,941 posts, read 20,410,993 times
Reputation: 19339
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokensky View Post
Lots of knowledge amongst this group . . . so I was wondering if we could share ideas/tips about how to live well on a budget (ways of saving money or seeking out bargains) that don't make us feel deprived. In fact, some strategies can actually be fun to pursue.

I am taking up sewing again, and deconstructing garments I have held onto b/c the fabric was so lovely. It is hard to get beautiful, substantial fabric these days.

If it becomes tedious, I won't continue with this pursuit, but thus far, it has been fun.

I have always been into saving money, so I haven't suddenly "discovered" ways to save money. Most I have been doing since I was a college student on limited funds, such as buying bread at the "day old bread store" - and freezing it.

I also make my own yogurt, but that has as much to do with wanting to eliminate preservatives as it does with saving money.

So what things do you do to stretch dollars?
Honestly -- I've been quilting over 10 years and my older stash fabric is SO much nicer. Totally get it. What are you repurposing the old stuff into?

I have been taking my own made totes (washable and dryable, much nicer than the cheapy bags the stores sell) and in a lot of place they save me some cents. We're not talking a lot, but I am a believer that cents add up. And you're not adding more plastic into the landfills.

Big library fan -- and they not only do books, but books on tape and DVDs. Look into reading groups there.

Check into your local sewing guild -- could be fun to meet up with other people who sew.

Lots of museums offer a free day -- like the first Thursday. Nice outing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2015, 09:08 PM
 
494 posts, read 881,468 times
Reputation: 1348
Some great tips here! And thanks for the suggestions about growing food--I am already looking forward to the salads (romaine, tomatoes) and soups (celery) I can make!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2015, 09:24 PM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,228,161 times
Reputation: 3330
Haircuts, massages, dental work, manicure and pedicures can all be had at discounts (maybe even free) at training schools.
Car repairs, too. Maybe even at a local high school auto shop/technical class -- IF they have those anymore.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2015, 09:41 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,196,777 times
Reputation: 3351
Lifetime Pass to ALL National Parks and Monuments is $10 at age 62!
Includes 1/2 price camping in National Parks & Forests.

Hiking & Biking is free exercise, sunshine and stress reduction.

Sleeping under the stars in the middle of nowhere is free.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2015, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Idaho
1,456 posts, read 1,158,299 times
Reputation: 5523
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I have been busy since I retired. There are way more things that I am trying to do and want to do than I have time or energy to accomplish. Trying to find ways to save money is not one of my interests or hobbies.
I am sure there are some retired people who sit around the house with little to do. I am not one of them nor do I know any.
Different strokes for different folks. Some people enjoy finding ways to save money. Some only enjoy spending money and some like to do both. For me, I enjoy doing both, saving by spending money carefully ;-).

It's perfectly fine if you rather do other stuffs than finding ways to save money. Speaking from my own experience, I would not equate finding ways to save money with having nothing else to do. I work full time, handle all of our financial affairs (paying bills, investments etc), have several serious hobbies (rowing, scuba diving, flying - just spent most of my evening hours last week studying for a rowing coaching clinic which took place last Sat & Sunday. I goofed off the weekend before last trying to fix the door in my hangar & went to semi-free conservatory concert). When I don't work or can not fly, dive, travel, I do whatever stuffs that I currently enjoy doing be it reading, planning for trip, searching for a retirement location, cooking, solving people's computer problems, saving money etc.

I have many hobbies/interests and count my blessings that I have the health and energy to enjoy living life to the fullest the cheapest way possible ;-)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top