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Thread summary:

Retirement advice: selling beach property, time to acclimate, community events

 
Old 01-11-2008, 09:44 PM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,871,258 times
Reputation: 11705

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This is a thread for retired transplants to tell the folks back in their old state what they think about the state of affairs.
I will start:
Maryland is expensive and overbought. Housing is due for a major correction and the state is living on past equity being financed by future debt. The prospect for retirement grows dimmer as taxes increase and equity decreases. I truly hope all trying to sell are able to soon so they can move on with their goals and dreams.
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Old 01-13-2008, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,826,958 times
Reputation: 18992
Here's what I'd like to tell the people of Redondo Beach, CA (the last city I moved from):

1. Whatever you do, don't sell beach property. Hold onto it if at all possible. Biggest mistake I ever made was selling a townhouse within 1 mile of the ocean. Don't kid yourself that the bottom will fall out of the real estate market there. They'll have a momentary dip and then rise higher than ever. Even when the national economy sours, beach properties do well because there are plenty of people from all over the world who would love to snap up property near the California beaches.

2. If you decide to move some place that has four seasons, prepare to feel uncomfortable the first year. It takes a while to acclimate. But... the good news is that after a few years you will love having variety in your weather.
Also, if you are headed to a region that has lush green forests, be prepared to experience mosquitoes and poison ivy--they are a fact of life. Not to worry, this is another thing you learn to handle. But it will really bother you the first year or so.

3. People back east do not like to hug as much as Californians. That does not mean they are not friendly, they have a different way of showing friendliness. On the plus side, you will catch fewer colds.

4. The "California way" of doing things is great--but if you want to make friends, resist the urge to make suggestions. Chill out and learn how your new neighbors do things. Follow their lead. Volunteer to help out with community events, and do things the way people ask you to. After you have established yourself as a part of the community, then you can make suggestions on how to do things better. If you can just chill for a year or so you will find it much easier to make friends... and you might even learna thing or two.
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Old 01-14-2008, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Official Missourian-Pray for the Natives
382 posts, read 972,231 times
Reputation: 374
Mississisloppy -

Mosquitos are bigger than your dog.
Fire ants are rampant.
Taxes, taxes and more taxes to support those who make more gainfully unemployed than contributing to the tax base.
Good ole boys politics.
Pot holes.
The brunt of many jokes.
Many locations you must shoot your way in and then shoot your way out.
Great citizens, awesome scenery going to heck in a hand basket unless there are major changes. Ain't gonna happen tho' cause there is no profit in fixing it.

Well, that's enough for one post. AND, I haven't even left yet!!!!
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Old 01-14-2008, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Oxygen Ln. AZ
9,321 posts, read 16,582,586 times
Reputation: 5692
California: Now you want to control the thermostats in households? This among many other reasons, is why we left.
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Old 01-17-2008, 07:05 PM
HDL
 
Location: Seek Jesus while He can still be found!
3,141 posts, read 6,021,146 times
Reputation: 8239
Thumbs up Great post Normie!!!

Very helpful and insightful too ! I have just started reading your 'retirement' posts and am really enjoying them. My dream, if I can ever retire , is to do volunteer work on an organic farm where I can share in the produce !

Anyways, I wish you the BEST life has to offer and thank you again for your sweet rep comment today !

Hugs,

~HDL~

Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
Here's what I'd like to tell the people of Redondo Beach, CA (the last city I moved from):

1. Whatever you do, don't sell beach property. Hold onto it if at all possible. Biggest mistake I ever made was selling a townhouse within 1 mile of the ocean. Don't kid yourself that the bottom will fall out of the real estate market there. They'll have a momentary dip and then rise higher than ever. Even when the national economy sours, beach properties do well because there are plenty of people from all over the world who would love to snap up property near the California beaches.

2. If you decide to move some place that has four seasons, prepare to feel uncomfortable the first year. It takes a while to acclimate. But... the good news is that after a few years you will love having variety in your weather.
Also, if you are headed to a region that has lush green forests, be prepared to experience mosquitoes and poison ivy--they are a fact of life. Not to worry, this is another thing you learn to handle. But it will really bother you the first year or so.

3. People back east do not like to hug as much as Californians. That does not mean they are not friendly, they have a different way of showing friendliness. On the plus side, you will catch fewer colds.

4. The "California way" of doing things is great--but if you want to make friends, resist the urge to make suggestions. Chill out and learn how your new neighbors do things. Follow their lead. Volunteer to help out with community events, and do things the way people ask you to. After you have established yourself as a part of the community, then you can make suggestions on how to do things better. If you can just chill for a year or so you will find it much easier to make friends... and you might even learna thing or two.
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