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Old 03-14-2015, 09:30 AM
 
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I think my husband is in the early stages of Dementia. Too many things to list here that makes me think that so can some of you let me know what to look for ? Thank you
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Old 03-14-2015, 09:37 AM
 
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Normal Aging vs Dementia | UCSF Memory and Aging Center


some things like forgetting where you put the keys is just aging or forgetting why you entered a room. It's if you find the keys in the crisper that it is a problem. Have you taken him to his Dr.? He should have his head scanned but also see a neuro Doc.
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Old 03-14-2015, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Southwestern, USA
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Hi, I can't remember the reason this works ..but
google coconut oil and the brain ...regarding dementia...
you will be amazed...it contains 'something'... I loaned my book
that explains it...that does 'something' to our brains that is very good!
Take care.
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Old 03-14-2015, 09:49 AM
 
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when we applied for long care care insurance they gave us not only an exam including hiv testing , drug testing but dementia tests too.

they gave us a few standardized tests which i never thought i could pass as i always forget stuff.

but when you are so focused the tests were very different outcomes from what i thought . the car keys , forgetting what you wanted to say or strangers names are all normal.

we passed so no issues.
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Old 03-14-2015, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
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My MIL is in the early to mid stages of dementia (she's 88). Some of the things that we noticed first were forgetting common words (like "comb") and making up a word ("hair-thing" for comb) to take it's place, repeating the same question many times an hour not realizing that it has been answered several times already, inability to find her way around and getting lost (even in the grocery store), forgetting big important things (like who is alive and who is dead), buying the same products over and over...even if you just bought them yesterday and don't need more. I think the very first thing we noticed was that she always ordered the exact same thing at restaurants because she had a tough time making any kind of decision, so she just ordered the same thing all the time. It was weird because she used to like a lot of foods, but now she could eat the exact same thing every day and be happy.

My dad had Alzheimer's and my first thing I noticed with him was telling stories of old days over and over immediately after telling the story. What I mean is within 3 minutes of finishing a story, he would start over and tell it all word for word just like he had never said it before. One of the common things is forgetting COMPLETELY what happened in the very recent period, but remembering the distant past very well. Also having good memory days and poor memory days seems common. It's like it comes and goes.

There are screening tests, although I don't know how you can get him to take it other than at the doctor's office. There could be something else going on though, so a doctor visit to rule out other things might be in order.

Last edited by TheShadow; 03-14-2015 at 10:17 AM..
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Old 03-14-2015, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
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here is a link to a self administered test for cognition:

SAGE: A Test to Measure Thinking Abilities | OSU Wexner Medical Center Test

You can also google the MMSE test that the doctor administered to my MIL. The score of the MMSE will help to determine the degree of cognitive loss, and the specific type of loss. It won't tell the reason for the loss however.
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Old 03-14-2015, 10:14 AM
 
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the examiner gave us three tests.

first was to spell world , then spell it backwards while being timed.

next he said a random word , we repeated it . at the end we had to recite all ten words.

if we had trouble they gave us a hint. we thought they were helping us pass.

they were really testing another aspect of our brains which was trigger recall.

the last part i have no idea how it worked.

they would give us sets of 3 animals and say pick which is different.

there was no right or wrong , we just had to reason something as to what.

at times they would give you mixed in with other animals the same group again in a different order.

i guess they check to see if your reasoning stays consistant.

last part was to name as many of the animals mentioned as i could.


i do feel much better since doing the tests since all the stuff we typically forget or that is like an echo in our head and only there until the echo stops is quite normal as we age.

Last edited by mathjak107; 03-14-2015 at 10:27 AM..
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Old 03-14-2015, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Idaho
1,452 posts, read 1,153,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
Normal Aging vs Dementia | UCSF Memory and Aging Center

some things like forgetting where you put the keys is just aging or forgetting why you entered a room. It's if you find the keys in the crisper that it is a problem.
Brava4, the link you gave is a good one with looking for multiple symptoms, signs to determine if it is the normal 'CRS' syndrome which we older folks experience at times or something more serious.

Your example of the keys in the crisper made me chuckle. Years ago when I was a long way from senility age, I put the 'stiffy' computer diskette containing the working copy of my Ph. D. thesis in the microwave and almost nuked it!. What happened was that I had two items in my hand entering the grad student lounge, a lunch box and a diskette. I meant to put the lunch box in the fridge, and had no ideas why I put the diskette in the microwave instead.

My absent-mindedness at that time resulted from too many late nights working on the thesis, and too hectic of a schedule trying to be a mother of a young child, a wife and a student at the same time. Now I have no excuses. If it happens again, it is likely the sign of senility or even dementia ;-)

Last edited by BellaDL; 03-14-2015 at 10:53 AM..
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Old 03-14-2015, 11:33 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,832 posts, read 18,839,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
My MIL is in the early to mid stages of dementia (she's 88). Some of the things that we noticed first were forgetting common words (like "comb") and making up a word ("hair-thing" for comb) to take it's place, repeating the same question many times an hour not realizing that it has been answered several times already, inability to find her way around and getting lost (even in the grocery store), forgetting big important things (like who is alive and who is dead), buying the same products over and over...even if you just bought them yesterday and don't need more. I think the very first thing we noticed was that she always ordered the exact same thing at restaurants because she had a tough time making any kind of decision, so she just ordered the same thing all the time. It was weird because she used to like a lot of foods, but now she could eat the exact same thing every day and be happy.

My dad had Alzheimer's and the first thing I noticed with him was telling stories of old days over and over immediately after telling the story. What I mean is within 3 minutes of finishing a story, he would start over and tell it all word for word just like he had never said it before. One of the common things is forgetting COMPLETELY what happened in the very recent period, but remembering the distant past very well. Also having good memory days and poor memory days seems common. It's like it comes and goes.

There are screening tests, although I don't know how you can get him to take it other than at the doctor's office. There could be something else going on though, so a doctor visit to rule out other things might be in order.
You described it perfectly from what I've seen. It's different for everyone but you've described how my Dad went through it. Probably the first symptom was forgetting words. This, from a person who readily told jokes and was quick witted. He lost the ability to speak. Another thing early on was doing crazy things like suddenly chopping down age old Rhododendrons all along the front of the house for no reason. In latter stages he pointed to a plant and motioned me to water it. The plant was a simple tomato plant--a gardener who couldn't remember tomato. Sad.

Then there is rage at not being able to communicate or function. But that came later.
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Old 03-14-2015, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,729,443 times
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I have been mildly absent-minded for as long as I can remember, i.e., college years. But it has NOT gotten worse, and I am now approaching 71. (Don't ask from which direction).

Little lapses bother me more now because I always wonder if they signal real problems, but yet they are not worse nor are they more frequent. I am saying that it is possible to over-react. An example:

About 20 years ago I put my ATM card in the machine in order to get cash and I could not recall my four-digit PIN which was not new and which I had used for years. I just could not recall it! Talk about shook up! I didn't know what to do, so I drove around the neighborhood, thinking that the end of my life was surely at hand. Well, the number came to me and I went back and got my cash. Such a thing has not happened again. I have no explanation for it. No, I was not drunk or even ill.

I realize that when things become a consistent pattern there is indeed cause for serious concern, and I am not seeking to minimize the tragic seriousness of what other posters have described in this thread so far. My comments are meant to say only that one can over-react to small things sometimes.
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