U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-18-2015, 02:43 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,198,325 times
Reputation: 10914

Advertisements

I can't wait to sleep in every day for 5 years straight. I suppose that is an expected sentiment given the fact I've been sleep deprived since I was 22 years old.

BTW - there is a theory that long term sleep deprivation is a factor in Alzheimer's. Hopefully the damage is not already done or at least not so bad there is no mitigation. I am hoping by eventually getting more sleep, I can delay some of the issues of aging a bit. So for me, I view retirement as being good for my health. I hope I get to retire some day.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-18-2015, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
1,888 posts, read 2,309,757 times
Reputation: 5333
Out of the 20 or so people that I know that retired voluntarily, not one has developed any health problems that I know of. Both myself and my wife have been retired now for more then 5 years and our general health is better then when we were working. Just before typing this both of us just came in the door from a 4 mile walk. When I was still working I couldn't walk a mile without getting tired and since I have retired my weight has decreased by 25 pounds. My BP and cholesterol are lower. When I was working I was having panic attacks, I don't have them any more.

I don't believe a word in the article.

People that are forced to retire before they are ready would have health problems, but if retirement was on your own then you should not have health issues. The people that retire because they don't feel well enough to continue working have already started the down hill trek to bad health, they just don't what's wrong with them yet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2015, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,879 posts, read 4,997,623 times
Reputation: 17404
A key point is that you need to have something to do. If you just sit at home and watch TV you'll likely become ill or even die.

Many people get a lot of fulfillment from work as a result of being needed and contributing and being recognized for their contributions. Once that goes away you need to fill that gap.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2015, 04:40 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
2,178 posts, read 2,097,807 times
Reputation: 2622
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
A key point is that you need to have something to do. If you just sit at home and watch TV you'll likely become ill or even die.

Many people get a lot of fulfillment from work as a result of being needed and contributing and being recognized for their contributions. Once that goes away you need to fill that gap.
Agreed, and to me that's part of being prepared for retirement. We've spent our working careers giving priority to work, and struggling to find time to enjoy all the recreational activities and hobbies we enjoy. Looking forward to readjusting that balance.

Dave
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2015, 05:15 PM
 
10,439 posts, read 9,429,886 times
Reputation: 16067
I don't believe there's one answer because we are all unique.

For me - I never wanted to go outside of my home to work (but my vices required a paycheck: food, roof over my head, etc.). My last day of work I was walking on Cloud 9. . . and am still there over four years later. I am living the life I've always wanted to live. I do 'whatever it is' I feel like doing, and whenever. Never feel bored or that I'm wasting away by not going to work M-F, 8 hrs a day.

My health has actually improved. . . blood pressure is back to a healthy reading; I sleep soundly through the night; and eat better since I have the time, and energy to prepare home-cooked meals. I have a large group of retired friends and not one of us regrets being out of the workforce.

Then, on the other side of the coin are those who do need the connection to a job to feel useful; and many are fearful of turning into a couch potato once they cut the cord. . . but again, we're all unique.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2015, 05:46 PM
 
1,838 posts, read 2,607,655 times
Reputation: 1798
Our health so far, knock on wood, has been fine but what happened was on weight gain and loss. DH and I retired just a few months apart. Over the first year he lost weight and I gained weight. He went from stress work, eating at fast food and, as I discovered, munching peanut M&M's off his desk to eating at home and much healthier. Me, I went from working in a school where I was constantly on my feet, running up and down stairs, no time to eat and a very short lunch time with a very set brought from home lunch to being at home, munching any time I wanted to and sitting on my duff. Not good for me at all. This past Christmas I had my son get me a FitBit for Christmas and we got into walking. Then my friend got me into a challenge on Fitbit so I'm now walking every day, drinking much more water, and eating smaller portions. So far it's working. I think your health can depend on how you approach it, keeping busy, be it physical or mentally or socially can make all,the difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2015, 05:57 PM
 
4,355 posts, read 6,077,228 times
Reputation: 10483
My husband has been retired for 10 years. He's 30 lbs thinner than when he sat behind a desk, he's active in the community, in golf, with travel and with family and friends. He's 68 and takes no medication, all his numbers are in normal range. Retirement was the best thing that happened to him/us.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2015, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
17,703 posts, read 11,255,729 times
Reputation: 37825
I've retired twice, once for a year and a half and the second time for 3 years. Both times I went back to work because I was bored out of my mind. I have a fully equipped shop where I build cars as a hobby, but even that got old after a while.

I found myself getting out of bed at 11 AM, staying up till all hours of the night, napping on the couch in the afternoon, and having no direction or purpose in my life. I was also not getting exercise, and my mental skills were suffering (you can only talk to your cats so much)

Now, I have somewhere to be 5 days a week, I feel better both mentally and physically, and the money ain't all that bad either. I will probably be one of those guys who works until the day he can either no longer do it, or dies.

Don
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2015, 09:17 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 84,124,097 times
Reputation: 18055
I have a friend who owned a body shop and built rods. He loves retirement. He built a full shop on his land when he retired and sold commercial shop. So as always it depends on person.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2015, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,788,557 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
A key point is that you need to have something to do. If you just sit at home and watch TV you'll likely become ill or even die.

Many people get a lot of fulfillment from work as a result of being needed and contributing and being recognized for their contributions. Once that goes away you need to fill that gap.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cnynrat View Post
Agreed, and to me that's part of being prepared for retirement. We've spent our working careers giving priority to work, and struggling to find time to enjoy all the recreational activities and hobbies we enjoy. Looking forward to readjusting that balance.

Dave
Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
I've retired twice, once for a year and a half and the second time for 3 years. Both times I went back to work because I was bored out of my mind. I have a fully equipped shop where I build cars as a hobby, but even that got old after a while.

I found myself getting out of bed at 11 AM, staying up till all hours of the night, napping on the couch in the afternoon, and having no direction or purpose in my life. I was also not getting exercise, and my mental skills were suffering (you can only talk to your cats so much)

Now, I have somewhere to be 5 days a week, I feel better both mentally and physically, and the money ain't all that bad either. I will probably be one of those guys who works until the day he can either no longer do it, or dies.

Don
Vision67, like Cnynrat, I also agree with you, and Don1945's story is a good illustration of the point you made. Although I, unlike Don, found lots to do after retirement and wouldn't want to contemplate going back to full-time work, I do understand his point of view.

This same basic discussion has taken place in quite a few threads in this Retirement Forum. In fact I have written the same thing Vision67 wrote (not in those exact words, of course) a couple or three times. Interestingly, that message has provoked rage in one or two posters. They were beside themselves that I would "dictate" what they should be doing in retirement, but that wasn't what I was doing at all. If someone is content and is thriving "smelling the flowers", I say more power to them. But my opinion remains that for the majority of us, Vision67 stated a basic truth and stated it very well in very few words.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top